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1970 CVC Helmet pics


hardheaded
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Sure don't! I've been picking military items up over the years and my knowledge is in other areas. Now I have to spend time finding out the details on the stuff I've collected :)

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Hi,

 

Some pics of a 1970 Combat Vehicle Crewman Helmet for you to view.

 

hardheaded

 

Nice, clean example of the standard T56-6 CVC helmet. Began development in the mid-50's but due to technical problems involving 'echoing' within the helmet it was not standardized and issued until 1961. This is the normal CVC helmet for the Vietnam War as well as the Cold War. This helmet was replaced beginning in 1973 by the DH-132 series helmet. Prior to the T-56-6 helmet being issued hodgepodge of tanker helmets were utilized. The WWII period Rawling's Pattern tank helmet continued in use through the Korean War but existing inventory was pretty much depleted by the end of the KW. The Army was running out of Rawling's Pattern (WWII) tank helmets and the T-56 CVC which was supposed to replace it was on hold so the Army allowed units with supply issues to purchase off the shelf commercial plastic football helmets and have them modified to accept communications gear. An assortment of other helmets were also pressed into service including the West German produced CVC helmet which we called the USAREUR CVC helmet and various USAF flight helmets.

 

Larry

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Nice, clean example of the standard T56-6 CVC helmet. Began development in the mid-50's but due to technical problems involving 'echoing' within the helmet it was not standardized and issued until 1961. This is the normal CVC helmet for the Vietnam War as well as the Cold War. This helmet was replaced beginning in 1973 by the DH-132 series helmet. Prior to the T-56-6 helmet being issued hodgepodge of tanker helmets were utilized. The WWII period Rawling's Pattern tank helmet continued in use through the Korean War but existing inventory was pretty much depleted by the end of the KW. The Army was running out of Rawling's Pattern (WWII) tank helmets and the T-56 CVC which was supposed to replace it was on hold so the Army allowed units with supply issues to purchase off the shelf commercial plastic football helmets and have them modified to accept communications gear. An assortment of other helmets were also pressed into service including the West German produced CVC helmet which we called the USAREUR CVC helmet and various USAF flight helmets.

 

Larry

 

Larry,

 

Thank You! for the great information, I really appreciate it.

 

hardheaded

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A perfect example of the type. Looks like the intercom would crackle into life if it was plugged in today!

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A perfect example of the type. Looks like the intercom would crackle into life if it was plugged in today!

 

Thanks Sabrejet!

 

Could I get your opinion on whether or not I should clean the green and white corrosion off of old helmet liners that have good webbing in them? Although I know this may be a little out of your field of expertise (just joking) since I've seen some of the excellent helmets you collect. “Some like 'em salty....but not me!”

 

Cheers!

Hardheaded

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Thanks for your kind words "Hardheaded"! Personally, if ever I have a liner with corroded washers I always endeavour to clean them up because it looks better but more to the point because excessive corrosion can rot the webbing! Usually it's the "A" washers which rust. I mask the webbing on either side then use a small wire brush (ie a suede brush) to remove the surface rust, followed up by a light rubbing with some fine Scotchbrite. If it's a post-war liner with black painted "A" washers I repaint them with some black Testors enamel. Works fine for me!

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Thanks for your kind words "Hardheaded"! Personally, if ever I have a liner with corroded washers I always endeavour to clean them up because it looks better but more to the point because excessive corrosion can rot the webbing! Usually it's the "A" washers which rust. I mask the webbing on either side then use a small wire brush (ie a suede brush) to remove the surface rust, followed up by a light rubbing with some fine Scotchbrite. If it's a post-war liner with black painted "A" washers I repaint them with some black Testors enamel. Works fine for me!

 

Thanks for your help! That's what I wanted to do. Make 'em purdy :)

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