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Post The Patch Type Crest Being Worn


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  • 2 weeks later...
Salvage Sailor

From my collection. A pre-war enlisted USAAC Technician who became a commissioned USAAF officer wearing the Air Transport Command DUI's on his epaulets. Nice side by side comparison of an early war stateside Lieutenants uniform vs. his overseas Captains uniform. Note the different caps, patches and overseas bars.

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lost-and-found-history

5th AAF Distinguished Unit pin on the Air Corps piped garrison cap of an ID'd FEAF/5th AAF uniform in my collection.

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5th AAF Distinguished Unit pin on the Air Corps piped garrison cap of an ID'd FEAF/5th AAF uniform in my collection.

It may have been a distinguished unit, but the pin is called a Distinctive Unit Insignia.

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lost-and-found-history

It may have been a distinguished unit, but the pin is called a Distinctive Unit Insignia.

Thank you for the correction

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Thank you for the correction

Or otherwise know, at least by collectors, a Patch Type Crest or PTC. An insignia worn in WWII through the mid 60s, based on the unit's shoulder patch, by a few individuals now and again as a DUI who didn't have a duly authorized DUI of their own, officially sanctioned in many cases for wear by whole units.These units, known as Non Color Bearing Units or NCBU, these being units that had no Colors only a Flag or if a Non regimental or battalion Company, a Guidon, thus not having a DUI, would sometimes wear these PTC's.

 

Check the whole topic from page 1, I think you'll find it very interesting :D.

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  • 3 weeks later...
  • 1 month later...

A mid-late Korean War GI wearing a unnumbered Armored Triangle PTC, he's an Engineer (disc and cap piping), so unknown as to unit, perhaps a seperate Armored Engineer Battalion??

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Colonel Maurice Rose in the foreground. He served as Chief of Staff of the 2nd Armored Division, so that is probably he unit represented here. Note the officer in the background is wearing an armored triangle patch type crest on his overseas cap instead of his rank. That is not only unusual, but I'm pretty sure it was unauthorized.

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Colonel Maurice Rose in the foreground. He served as Chief of Staff of the 2nd Armored Division, so that is probably he unit represented here. Note the officer in the background is wearing an armored triangle patch type crest on his overseas cap instead of his rank. That is not only unusual, but I'm pretty sure it was unauthorized.

Not unusual at all Sean, remember this post you made, and remembering that at this time Officers did wear as a matter of course their units DI on this side of the cap, the practice of which fell out soon after.

 

Posted by seanmc1114 on 06 June 2013 - 08:07 AM in DISTINCTIVE UNIT INSIGNIA / UNIT CRESTS

MG Lloyd Fredendall as commanding officer of the 4th Infantry Division wearing the patch crest on his overseas cap c. 1940 -1941.

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  • 2 months later...

Americal Division patch type crest worn on a black beret in Vietnam. I believe this guy is a combat photographer based on his camera and scroll.

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firefighter

Americal Division patch type crest worn on a black beret in Vietnam. I believe this guy is a combat photographer based on his camera and scroll.

Scroll looks to have, OFFICAL ?? CORRESPONDANT

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79th infantry division

Ebay purchase, searched internet and found a picture of old WW1 veteran with a crest on a headgear.

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79th infantry division

Ebay purchase, searched internet and found a picture of old WW1 veteran with a crest on a headgear.

 

Distinctive Insignia were not authorized until c. 1922 and were not worn during WW 1. It is a cap insignia at best, just like many pilots wore insignia badges on their chests during WW I.

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Distinctive Insignia were not authorized until c. 1922 and were not worn during WW 1. It is a cap insignia at best, just like many pilots wore insignia badges on their chests during WW I.

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Distinctive Insignia were not authorized until c. 1922 and were not worn during WW 1. It is a cap insignia at best, just like many pilots wore insignia badges on their chests during WW I.

According to the info the picture was taken in 1940's. If you look closely at his medals, you can see purple heart, which was awarded to WW1 veterans in 1930's.

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According to the info the picture was taken in 1940's. If you look closely at his medals, you can see purple heart, which was awarded to WW1 veterans in 1930's.

 

It is still not a "DUI." I have seen these several times with WW1 79th Division groups. They were purchased by the soldiers in France before coming home.

 

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It is still not a "DUI." I have seen these several times with WW1 79th Division groups. They were purchased by the soldiers in France before coming home.

 

Well, patch tipe crest is technically not a DUI

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There were and still are some officially approved and worn "patch type" Army DUIs. Some examples are 1st, 2nd and 3rd Armored Division NCBU, 3rd, 4th Infantry and Hawaiian Division, I Corps, and 82nd Airborne Division are a few.

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According to the info the picture was taken in 1940's. If you look closely at his medals, you can see purple heart, which was awarded to WW1 veterans in 1930's.

Apples and oranges, and still not a DI.

 

Not only were these popular w/ 79th Div folks, the 2nd Div had many an enameled Indian on a white star worn on their fouragerres. They aren't DIs, either.

 

During WWI, and later, the chief authorized insignia to denote regimental affiliation was the collar disk.

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