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US Army, 8th Infantry Division


8th ID
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SKYLINE DRIVE

WOW!! What a great collection, I really enjoyed going through your posts! Well done!!

 

Hi,

Little mention on the 8th, Germany 1945 ...

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Is it just me or has the soldier kneeling on the right a folding stock M1A1 carbine?

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Hello everyone,

Remember, I presented an Ike jacket climbing behind the 8th Infantry Division in which holes are present on the neck, indicated the presence of Crest at the time.

With the help of the son of a veteran of the 8th Infantry Division, we determined that the presence of OLC on the PUC, he had to find a unit that had received at least twice.

It is the 28th Infantry Regiment received three DUC: Normandy, Bergstein and Stockheim.

Why not the other regiments you say?

Just because the 121st Infantry Regiment received a single PUC. This is precisely the 2nd Battalion, which has obtained in the Hurtgen Forest in 1945.

As the 13th Infantry Regiment, he has never received.

I share this Ike rise of origin where only two crest, a screw and the other to pin Meyer brand for both, were added.

Good evening and thank you Greg C. !


 

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hi,

 

This is an interesting and emotional original WWII frontline letter, written in France on the 2nd of September 1944 by an American infantryman. This letter was written by Corporal Raymond R. Szczepanski, 28th Infantry Regiment, 8th Infantry Division.

There is interesting and emotional content in this frontline letter. Corporal Szczepanski was optimistic that the war was nearing it's end. He was encouraged by a prediction that the war would be over by September 7th, which was only five days away. He hoped that he would be home for Christmas:

"Am getting along good and things, according to the paper, are very, very good. Just hope it all ends very, very soon.

... Being kept busy at all times... I'm not writing as often to the others at home as I used to, but explain to them that when I'm so busy I hardly get time to write to you. But tell them that I'm getting along very good and hope I get home for Christmas. The Journal said September 7th, so I hope it's right."

Szcsepanski had recently attended a church service conducted by a chaplain named Father Langley. This chaplain had apparently been away from the unit for awhile, and Szczepanski was glad that he was back:

"Was to church and communion the other day. Father Langley is back with us again, and is very happy to be back with us, and we are happy to get him back."

And After Action Report of September 2, 1944

 

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8th ID

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Howard W. Kunkel (1914-1997), was the husband of the late Anna M. (Greenawalt) Kunkel.

He worked in the maintenance department of the Caloric Corp., former Topton plant, for 30 years before retiring in 1981.

Born in Lynn Township, he was a son of the late Warren and Beulah (Rausch) Kunkel.

He was a member and former deacon of Jacob's United Church of Christ, New Tripoli.

He was an Army veteran of World War II.

He was a member and former volunteer for the Northwestern Ambulance Association, New Tripoli, and a member of the Kempton Fire Company and Rod and Gun Club.

Survivors: Daughters, Jane A., wife of Richard Warmkessel of Mertztown, and Janet R. Reeves of Reading; son, Warren H. of Kempton; sister, Miriam, wife of Clifford Reichel of Kutztown; brothers, Clarence of Kempton R.2 and Herman of Allentown, and five grandchildren.

Contributions: Church memorial fund.

 

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8th ID

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The Reverend Clyde Campbell Scherz - born 1926 in Cincinnati, Ohio; attended Kemper Military School & Berkshire Academy before entering WW II on July 4, 1944 on Omaha Beach. Clyde Scherz was part of the 28th Regiment that made the early August sweep from Rennes to Brest, and fought through the Hurtgen Forrest to capture the town of Hurtgen on November 28, and paving the way for the fall of Kleinhau the next day. The division & regiment held a 6 mile segment of the Roer river during the battle of the bulge, in which Clyde Scherz was wounded by a German 88 MM barrage. He attended Miami University (Oxford, Ohio) after the war, and became a loving husband to Emily Ottenjohn, and father to John T. Scherz and Anne T. Scherz. After many years of selfless service to Reformed Episcopal church, Clyde Scherz was ordained in the early 1970s. The Reverend Scherz passed in 1997, at the age of 71.

 

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8th ID

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  • 4 weeks later...

Hello,

Here is a more than friendly back , thank you to my friend 35 David !

Crest Co. D 13th Infantry of the 8th Infantry Division :

 

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I also share a new post, always written by the soldier Raymond R. Szczepanski - 28th Infantry - 8th Division (see : former post) :

Corporal Szczepanski explains that he was busy and didn't have much time to write. He hoped that the war was nearing it's end. He states that he was doing well, but adds that sleeping on the ground all the time was difficult:

"Can't write much, as we will be busy the remainder of the day... News is getting better every day. Just hope and pray it all ends very very soon, cause I'm really getting sick of this life. Maybe if I had you here it wouldn't be so bad, but being married and so far apart is a lot of crap. Anyway I'm still getting along very good and very healthy, to my surprise, sleeping on good old mother earth. A little stiff in the mornings."

 

Szczepanski goes on to relate that he and the man he was sharing his foxhole with, a soldier named Kirst, had been passing the time at night discussing what they would do after the war was over.

 

And After Action Report of this date.

 

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This is my latest find , thank you to Bertrand for his MP !
It is an identity of a KIA 8th plate , the 121st infantry to be precise.
On 25 November 1944, the 121st fought in the Hurtgen Forest .
This is a tag GRS (grave registration service), for the grave of a soldier, since none of the GI tag has been found.
It comes from Neuville even where the soldier was buried in 1945, before being repatriated to the USA .
The cemetery moved to 46, so that many tags were lost.
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I also want to show you some variations 8th patches (color, shape, size, etc ...)

 

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And good evening to all !

 

 

8th ID

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  • 1 month later...
Hello,
Remember, there is a moment I have introduced you to the cap:

 

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The other day I received an email Brewen (whom I thank again the way) telling me a 8th shirt for sale on the net. He had the eye because he remembered that I already had the cap of this man.
I then take immediately contact the seller to opt for immediate purchase.
Successful operation, the sleeve joins the cap ..

 

 

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Nod to Avranches museum ...

Hi everyone!

I present my latest creation:

I wanted to be a soldier of the 8th Infantry Division freshly landed in Normandy in July 1944.

For this, I am inspired by the model on the old museum of Avranches, auctioned in 2009.

 

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  • 1 month later...

Hello; Very nice collection and display... My uncle was in co. K, 28th regiment in WWII. He was awarded a silver star and spent a short time as a POW. I was wondering if you would have any photos of co. K around 1944-45 and or information on a Sergeant John Muglia? Thanks, Allen

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  • 1 month later...

Hello to everybody,

 

Weeks of holidays (revisions) rather rich it militaria, I present you my last finds. I begin with these three photos (already presented) eccentrics and large format take snuff in 1941 (13th Infantry and 12th Engineers) :

 

 

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Finally, magnificent curb chain(chain bracelet) of the soldier G S CULPEPPER of the 8th. With several colleagues we are spirit to examine but for the moment it is very difficult … Case to be followed also thus … Nothing of marked in the back if it is not a code manufacturer of three figures:

 

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++

 

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Then, very beautiful class A gone(taken) up by origin to the colors of the 28th Infantry with a girl surprised in the collar(pass). I found nothing in the roster of the 28th, the case to be followed … The presence of the ribbon " american legion medal " (war veteran's association) takes me to wonder why there is not a ruptured duck?

 

 

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I also present you this holster engraved(burnt) by a boy of the 8th, the presence of a laundry but little luck(chance) to find his(her) landlord. The holster was accompanied with a belt M36 and with a PC for 45 (already sold), the whole went out of a secondhand trade in the Maryland 6 years ago

 

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Hi,
Good condition is not great but I'm pretty happy ...
The helmet was found in an empty barracks in Schwerin in the early 90s. This barracks was used by the Wehrmacht during the Second World War and the Russian during the Cold War.
The city of Schwerin is the farthest in the course of the 8th ID in the second war.
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  • 1 month later...
  • 4 weeks later...
  • 4 months later...

Hi,

 

This is an interesting and emotional original WWII frontline letter, written in France on the 2nd of September 1944 by an American infantryman. This letter was written by Corporal Raymond R. Szczepanski, 28th Infantry Regiment, 8th Infantry Division.

 

There is interesting and emotional content in this frontline letter. Corporal Szczepanski was optimistic that the war was nearing it's end. He was encouraged by a prediction that the war would be over by September 7th, which was only five days away. He hoped that he would be home for Christmas:

 

"Am getting along good and things, according to the paper, are very, very good. Just hope it all ends very, very soon.

 

... Being kept busy at all times... I'm not writing as often to the others at home as I used to, but explain to them that when I'm so busy I hardly get time to write to you. But tell them that I'm getting along very good and hope I get home for Christmas. The Journal said September 7th, so I hope it's right."

 

Szcsepanski had recently attended a church service conducted by a chaplain named Father Langley. This chaplain had apparently been away from the unit for awhile, and Szczepanski was glad that he was back:

 

"Was to church and communion the other day. Father Langley is back with us again, and is very happy to be back with us, and we are happy to get him back."

 

And After Action Report of September 2, 1944

 

71871011.jpg
sans_t17.jpg

 

8th ID

As i reread this post today, i realized that i also have a letter from this same soldier.

Glad the another one is in good hands.

 

-Dave

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