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1950s USN G1 Jacket


History Man
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History Man

Picked this up recently and thought I would share. It is a size 38 but sadly the label is worn so I cant read the maker. It is in overall decent shape with wear in different places. The leather is supple and has been repaired multiple times on the back, the cuffs are torn, the lining is torn in a couple of places, the Conmar zipper is missing teeth, but the fur is in great shape. It also appears a name tag once resided on the left breast.

 

Philip

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Garandomatic

How can you tell it is from the 50s? I've got one that is pretty intact that I think a WWII Navy vet bought, either in the service, or as surplus, for his civilian flying, and I was hoping it was WWII.

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History Man

I am not 100% sure, but I believe if they have the mini pen pocket within the front pocket they are from the 50s.

 

Philip

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I've got an identical one (in perfect condition!) circa 1961. The only way to tell is by the contract date on the label...which is sadly worn off yours!

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How can you tell it is from the 50s? I've got one that is pretty intact that I think a WWII Navy vet bought, either in the service, or as surplus, for his civilian flying, and I was hoping it was WWII.

 

If it's a WW2 version it will be an M422A. The G-1 designation is post-war though both types are essentially similar. Check the stock label, if it's present? A WW2 jacket will have USN stencilled in white under the collar. G-1s will usually have USN punched out in holes on the front fly.

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Maverickson

I've got an identical one (in perfect condition!) circa 1961. The only way to tell is by the contract date on the label...which is sadly worn off yours!

 

 

I beg to differ with your forgone conclusion. I'm an avid 1950s G-1 jacket collector. With or without a label, there are many ways to approximate the date of most any G-1 jacket. Not to mention, by the looks of it I know immediately that this jacket predates 1961.

 

 

From my perspective & regardless of the fact that this jacket's label now illegible, that small toothed aluminum toothed Conmar zipper assembly was used exclusively during the 7823 (AER) model G-1 jacket. The (AER) model jackets were made between 1951 and 1960.

 

 

With just a few more detailed photos I'm more than certain that the year of production and maker could be narrowed down even further.

 

 

 

Cheers, Dave

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Wharfmaster

 

 

 

I beg to differ with your forgone conclusion. I'm an avid 1950s G-1 jacket collector. With or without a label, there are many ways to approximate the date of most any G-1 jacket. Not to mention, by the looks of it I know immediately that this jacket predates 1961.

 

 

From my perspective & regardless of the fact that this jacket's label now illegible, that small toothed aluminum toothed Conmar zipper assembly was used exclusively during the 7823 (AER) model G-1 jacket. The (AER) model jackets were made between 1951 and 1960.

 

 

With just a few more detailed photos I'm more than certain that the year of production and maker could be narrowed down even further.

 

 

 

Cheers, Dave

Dave, could you please increase the size of your font. It is very hard for us old guys to read.

 

Thanks and regards,

 

W

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Maverickson

Mine's an AER made by Bauer, spec no. 55J14 then. Good info to know.

 

 

There has never been a Military Spec USN jacket maker by the name of Bauer. I believe that you have misinterpreted Bauer for BUAER which is seen at the top of a Mil Spec label on USN jackets. BUAER is the military's acronym for Buero of Aeronautics.

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Maverickson

What close ups would be needed to pin down a date and manufacturer?

 

Philip

 

HI Philip,

 

The 7823 (AER) model G-1 is a transitional flight jacket as compared with earlier and later model jackets. In other words, It fits somewhere between the ealier made M-442 flight jacket and later versions of the G-1. More over, each inidividual jacket maker had charateristics made into their jacket's which completely differed from one individual maker to another.

 

A good example of a transitional charateristic found on (AER) jacket's is the method utilized in the application of USN to the jacket. It could have either been stenciled on to the back of the collar with USN. This stenciling was a hold out from the early USN jacket. Then later model (AER) jackets had USN perferated into the wind flap which continues on in all later model G-1 jackets..

 

The size of the pleated back and where it attaches to the back belt of the jacket in the (AER) could either be small like those seen on all earlier M-422A or large depending on the maker. Those jackets made with a larger size pleat tended to move the back belt forward or towards the front of the jacket. In all later model G-1 jacket made subsequent to the (AER) model the only style that can be found is large.

 

Generally, it is easy to identify those jackets with the smaller size pleat where it attaches to the back belt of the jacket tend to have pockets which are set further back from the zipper. The jacket makers which best demonstrate this characteristic are the California Sportswear and Dubow. On the other hand, those jackets with a larger pleat at the back belt tend to have their zipper assmblies attached closer together at the front of the jacket. However, those jackets with their pockets attached to the front of their jacket closer together are the more often that not found on most (AER) jackets. Subsequently, that charateristic of attaching pockets in close proximity to the zipper was never deviated from again and found on all later model jackets.

 

Another defining characteristic of the individual (AER) jacket makers is the shape of the wind flap. Each individual maker more often than not would give their jacket a completely different look from one another. For instance, the Monarch did not take their wind flap to the bottom of the jacket. The Weber tended the be more wide than any other maker. The Cagleco had a thin and where it attached at the highest point they gave the flap an angular shape.

 

The pocket flap shape is one of the better ways used to identify the individual (AER) G-1 jacket maker. As the shape of each jacket maker tended to vary from one maker to the other. The pocket flap shape from one maker to another would vary from straight, angular , to bell or even scallop shaped. Those earlier made M-422A jackets maintain those unusually shaped pocket flaps while most all later models (outside of those now reproduced) have competely lost their individuality by doing away with the different style pocket flaps. More modern jackets now maintain a straight shaped flap and at best bell pocket flaps.

 

The list goes on! There were different zipper makers used from one maker to another but all are the smaller size #5 toothed assemblies are found on the (AER) and ealier jackets. This single charateristic of the smaller size tooth zipper assemblies endears me to all early flight jackets.

 

 

Thanks, Dave

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Garandomatic

Thanks for the heads up, I assumed it was just a clothing company, possibly associated with the Eddie Bauer company. I'm just glad it isn't a civilian version, which was in the back of my mind before you made me pay attention to the exact order of those letters!

 

There has never been a Military Spec USN jacket maker by the name of Bauer. I believe that you have misinterpreted Bauer for BUAER which is seen at the top of a Mil Spec label on USN jackets. BUAER is the military's acronym for Buero of Aeronautics.

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