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Show Yo Swagga - Swagger Sticks, All Eras


12A54
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Swagger sticks are definitely a traditional British military thing, "borrowed" by the US military.

 

"Much like using Kevlar in helmets was borrowed from the Yanks by the British." :)

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Much like using Kevlar in helmets were borrowed from the Yanks by the British. :)

Chobham armour in M1 tanks....Sam Browne belts....Brodie helmets....etc ;)

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I'll give you the first one Ian maybe even the second but honestly, you know the M-1 was the inspiration for the less than eye-appealing "Turtle" that replaced the near useless Brodie for WWII open fighting. ^_^

Back on track... this is a wonderful "Brit" inspired swagger stick!

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I'll give you the first one Ian maybe even the second but honestly, you know the M-1 was the inspiration for the less than eye-appealing "Turtle" that replaced the near useless Brodie for WWII open fighting. ^_^

 

Back on track... this is a wonderful "Brit" inspired swagger stick!

 

 

Yes...it is. One of my biggest regrets concerns my paternal grandfather, who was a Senior NCO in The Welch Regiment (traditional spelling) in WW1. He had a swagger stick complete with the regimental crest...I recall it as a boy. However, he died in the early 60s and I never saw it again. I'd love to have it today!

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Yes...it is. One of my biggest regrets concerns my paternal grandfather, who was a Senior NCO in The Welch Regiment (traditional spelling) in WW1. He had a swagger stick complete with the regimental crest...I recall it as a boy. However, he died in the early 60s and I never saw it again. I'd love to have it today!

 

You often wonder if those things got misplaced, sold or throne out. All you can hope for is that somewhere in England, someone is taking good care of it in their collection. I've got a great U.S. Army swagger stick with snake-skin overlaying it. It is very cool! I assume it's from an officer of higher rank but, I'll never know. I got it at an antique store where it was stuck in a barrel of umbrella's .

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Yes...it is. One of my biggest regrets concerns my paternal grandfather, who was a Senior NCO in The Welch Regiment (traditional spelling) in WW1. He had a swagger stick complete with the regimental crest...I recall it as a boy. However, he died in the early 60s and I never saw it again. I'd love to have it today!

 

You will like the one I have 'GWELL ANGAU NA GHYWILYDD', 'BETTER DEATH THAN DISHONOUR, its a WW1 Battalion one, the Welsh spelling on the cap badge, the Enlish inflicteded on us :o , the Welch spelling on the cap badge, came back in in 1922,

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Nice naval swagger stick. Though not as commonly used by US naval and army personnel to the same degree as the British and the members of their empire, swagger sticks were used by American Forces in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The Marines embraced their usage broadly, were they went out of vogue with the other branches by WWII.

 

The most significant use of Swagger Sticks by US forces from what I have found in my research has been mostly those serving in the Far East in places like the Philippine, Guam, China and Hawaii. A number of these officers and others maintained their habit of carrying a swagger stick to Europe during WWI.

 

Though historically a symbol of authority dating back to Roman times (a baton), swagger sticks in the Far East also helped serve as a means to keep the local beggars as a distance.

 

Since you began this forum focused on US Naval swagger sticks, here are a few that date from 1900 to 1917.

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A rare named USNA graduates swagger stick with a custom design in the form of a ships capstan and the officers class year insignia. The graduates monogram is engraved on the end cap.

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Happy to add to the discussion. I have been collecting American Swagger sticks for a number of years. They are generally not sought out by collectors, but many allow for the owners to be identified, which makes them interesting.

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Here is an early Officer's swagger stick or Bosun's starter cane. The stick is 30" long and the Boxer or Bulldog head is cast brass. There is a anchor and a USN carved into the stick. From the carving and casting the stick seems to be early to mid 19th century. My guess is that the ship was "Boxer" since Bulldog does not fit the time. The first Boxer in American history was actually Her Majesties British Ship" (HMS) Boxer, a Brig of 14 guns with a keel measuring 98 feet in length and just over 28 feet in breadth. The HMS Boxer, commanded by Captain Blyth, was sailing off the coast of Portland, Maine on September 5, 1813, when she was met by the USS Enterprise, commanded by Lieutenant William Burrows. The fight that ensued was heroic for both ships, and in the end Boxer's crew surrendered her to U.S. forces.
The first, the newly refurbished HMS Boxer (renamed the USS Boxer) was launched on May 17, 1815, with a new array of fourteen 32-pound cannons and two long 9-pound cannons. She was first Commanded by Lieutenant John Porter who sailed her to the Mediterranean to join Commodore Perry's squadron.
The second Boxer was the first USS Boxer built from the keel up. Constructed as a schooner, the second Boxer -sister ship to the fourth Enterprise - was launched on November 22, 1831, at the Boston Navy Yard. The ship was 88 feet long, 23 feet wide, had a battery of 10 guns and cost the U.S. Navy $30,697.00 to build. The USS Boxer served the U.S. Navy for 17 years, sailing the seas of the world until decommissioning in 1848.
The third Boxer, an English-built iron "side-wheeled" steamer, was originally known as the Tristam Shanty, that measured 222 feet in length and 23 feet in width. The Tristam Shanty was used by the Confederate military to run blockades the United States had established during the Civil War. However, she was captured by USS Kansas on May 15, 1864 then purchased by the U.S. Navy from the Boston Prize Court and commissioned into service as the "USS Boxer" on August 12, 1864. These ships seem to be the period of the stick but the head could also be a bulldog. Everything is a guess but it is fun to envision a piece that was on an American Naval vessel during the "War of 1812".

Dick

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  • 5 months later...

Here is a swagger stick that I have that I do not know much about. Not sure what unit or war. I think WWII but could be earlier. I have not been able to find the crest. I also believe the far east, maybe Burma/CBI based upon the 3 headed elephant crest opposite the star crest. It is a very nice swagger stick with other parts of a .50 cal bullet. The stick is approx. 22 inches long. Any information would be helpful. Most of my unit crest, etc. ref material is still in storage.

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  • 1 year later...

I bought a swagger stick yesterday and it got me thinking. I posted the one I bough yesterday and I decided to post the one my granddad bought my dad in 1949 for a quarter. It was one of the first things to hang in my room that I could handle. So show your swagger here!

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  • 4 months later...

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