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War Correspondent


willysmb44
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Erwin,

Correspondents did use captured vehicles, but not very often and not for long. Ernie Pyle was given a Kubelwagen by the unit that captured it (not doubt in an attempt to have the unit noted in one of his disptaches) but it was quickly taken away for fear that some GI might light up the most famous war correspondent of all time by accident, thinking it was a German driving it.

 

Another nice shot of a Press bag being used as vehicle ID.(under Yank cover)

 

Indeed. Sometimes I wonder if those bags were used to mark vehicles more often than they were used for their intended purpose of carrying material for dispatches.

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I thought I'd include this shot of my wife and I, taken at my living history/display group's annual Christmas party earlier this month (we're standing in the lobby of a nearby 1930 movie theater that is currently undergoing restoration). My wife totally surprised me by not only finding a reproduction 40s dress, but having her hair done up in the proper style, too (something I never thought she'd do).

I'm wearing my correspondent class As but the patches are kind of hard to see in this shot.

And before anyone asks, yes, it was relatively common for civilian correspondents to wear normal officer's service hats with the eagle in their class As.

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Thanks for the info, Lee.

I asked about the use of those vehicles for the reason you mentioned (being mistaken for the enemy).

 

And a very nice shot of you two btw.

 

Erwin

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The use of captured equiptment and vehicles was common as you know. My dads service group latched onto a german trailer to haul extra gear behind their CCKW.

They were assigned to 3rd Army. When Gen.Patton saw it,he ordered it gone!

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I asked about the use of those vehicles for the reason you mentioned (being mistaken for the enemy).

 

Erwin,

It was a very good question, in that on the face of it, you'd assume that a Correspondent would likely be driving captured vehicles as they were normally never accorded their own US ones for transport. Contrary to popular belief, Correspondents didn't have their own personal vehicles (with the exception of Stars and Stripes cartoonist Bill Mauldin who was assigned one by 5th Army, which he didn't have for long as he left it to head off to France) and usually had to bum rides.

12th Army Group did have a unit that 'corralled' correspondents on the continent (based out of the Hotel Scribe in Paris for a while) and I'd think many correspondents could be seen riding on Jeeps and WCs bearing the unit markings of the 72nd PSB, a unit that handled mostly public relations for 12AG. Yes, the Army did have a large effort to that end in the ETO, hard as it may be to imagine it today.

 

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  • 7 months later...

FYI, Bryan Ilyankoff and I are planning to do another joint WW2 correspondent/photographer display in the area of Fort Vancouver (WA) this coming Saturday, July 23rd: https://www.nps.gov/fova/planyourvisit/event-details.htm?event=0CC489BA-1DD8-B71B-0B11280C4F9ADF91

I'm not 100% sure right now if it'll be in the actual Fort itself, or over at the Pierson Air Museum building nearby.

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Nice to see you out and about with Bryan and your displays.I can imagine the work involved.Can you ask Bryan if he will be attending Rockford this year?

Have fun,

Bob

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Bob, Bryan said he should be at Rockford this year.

He and I did displays independently of each other for a long time before either of us thought to ask the other to double up as our interests are not overlapping but work well in parallel as the civilian correspondents and military photographers worked side-by-side often during WW2. For example, USMC Staff Sgt. Bill Genaust stood right next to Joe Rosethall as they both got the famous second flag raising at Iwo Jima, Genaust with a movie and camera and Rosenthall with his Speed Graphic.

the MVPA convention in Portland was a bust in that we got zero recognition or even acknowledgement we were even there. But still, we love showing off our collections...

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The Fort Vancouver display went okay. After some initial confusion over where we were setting up (made worse by some the oh-so-common self-important re-enactor incorrectly trying to talk for the venue), we got inside the main hangar at the Pearson Air Museum. We avoided the blazing sun and breezes which would have seriously damaged much of the items in our display. But the venue itself made for a small area, so our displays were much smaller than we could have brought.
Mostly, the public interactions were good, but we were completely ignored by all the media coverage of the event. At this point, we've been completely ignored by the coverage of the event every time we set up a joint display together. To be blunt, I'm now wondering why I even bother with all the time, trouble and expense to do these.

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post-2617-0-97749100-1469475706.jpg

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Can you tell me a little about the cameras and typewriter in the last photos?

 

There's an Argus C3 'brick' and a couple of pre-war FILMO 8MM wind-up film cameras. The typewriter is a 1938 Underwood Champion with the extra fold-out 'desk' option. It was in almost NOS condition when I found it at an antique show. With the new ribbon I put in it a while back, it works like the day it was made.

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  • 1 year later...
doinworkinvans

Lee....cleaned up lots of dead links at the start of this thread. You should be able to read the text and add back the photos that were lost. I am sure everyone would love to see the older photos if you get time to add them back. Great thread!

 

-Daniel

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  • 3 weeks later...
  • 1 month later...

I just got this original drawing by Howell Dodd, a Associated Press War artist. He landed with the 1st Infantry Division at Normandy.

I have several wire photos of his drawings, and a few printed examples.

Somebody on eBay found several of his original drawings from the 1940s, and has listed them recently. This the one I really wanted of them, and I still can't believe I now own one of his Originals.post-2617-0-55128700-1523335196.jpg

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