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War Correspondent


willysmb44
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'Flage Guy

"Something you don't see every day"...boy, you can say that again!! :w00t:

First-class and very unique displays all the way- thanks for sharing!

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I set up a tent display at an airshow over this weekend, It rained modt of the time so lots of people came and looked it over, almost all said they had never seen this stuff before...
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Your display looks really good. You should write up show reports on the typewriters for folks that visit your display, living history in action etc :D
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willysmb44

 

 

Your display looks really good. You should write up show reports on the typewriters for folks that visit your display, living history in action etc :D

Thanks! I actually tried writing a real article “in the field” once:

I am probably the only accredited WW2 re-enacting War Correspondent in the hobby today, being a staffer for WW2 Re-enacting Magazine. The photo above was taken at a D-Day event at Fort Stevens, Oregon (where a Japanese sub really shelled the fort in 1942). I was writing an article for the magazine at the event in my correspondent impression. I decided to type out the article on my typewriter then scan it into a work document. That lasted all of 15 or so minutes. In that time, I was interrupted about 2-3 times each minute by a spectator (all women, oddly) who wanted to either talk about typewriters they knew in their youth or to show their kids someone typing. I made the downright insane decision to go elsewhere and try to get some ‘combat sketches;’ of the event, and was downright mobbed by people. The more rude ones demanded I move my hand so they could see and several stood directly between me and the people I was trying to draw. I finished my work from a high perch nobody else could get to on top of a bunker.
But at events where I’m displaying, yes, I usually type out the start of the fictional “report,” with the names of guys who showed up as the GI’s in the story. It’s easy to write a fake news item, as most of them were all flag-waving “Our good boys making Jerry hurt” kind of stuff. At the event with the tent last month, the other typewriter had a fake typewriter supply request to public relations SFAEF in Paris, griping about how Stars and Stripes staffers having to double up with the Yank Magazine people. Few people read them but for the ones who did, they really liked it.
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  • 2 weeks later...
Thought you may enjoy this.

 

Here is a picture of a display at camp Dodge Iowa.Includes Items from the WW2-Korea-Viet nam career of Gordon Gamuck.Also Jack Shelly and Herb Plambeck.All from Iowa

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Wow, this picture brings back memories. I'm from Iowa and growing up my dad (794th AAA AW Btn.) always turned on WHO radio at noon, and listened to the farm reports with Herb Plambeck. Then when I went to Iowa State, well, at the time I thought about journalism, and who was my instructor in my introductory journalism class. Yep, none other than Jack Shelly.

 

Thank you so much for the memory.

 

P.S. this is why I like this forum so much, something for everyone and I"m learning tons of things.

 

Brian Blankenburg (bammerbb)

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Very nice collection. War correspondents in WWII were about as crazy as chaplains walking into war zones without much for defense.

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  • 5 months later...
Johan Willaert

Mark Bando just posted this photo on his webpage:

http://www.101airborneww2.com/et.html

 

with the following caption:

 

Charles Haacker ® is shown in a dugout somewhere in Germany in early 1945. You can see his speed graphic camera. The medic was Sal Acerra, a former caption writer for ACME. This was a chance reunion of two former co-workers at the front. I wanted to share this recently-acquired photo, because the son of Mr. Haacker used to lurk on this website. He contacted me years ago and he lamented that his dad was not allowed to keep any significant number of the photos he had taken in the WWII ETO war zones. One of the photos of General McAuliffe taken when Patton broke through to Bastogne was taken by Charles Haacker.

 

Note the patches on the sleeve and above the chest pocket on what seems an M43 Field Jacket... Thought you'd like to see this...

post-92-1293962123.jpg

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Mark Bando just posted this photo on his webpage:
http://www.101airborneww2.com/et.html
WOW, great photo! Classic late-war placement of patches on the jacket. I wonder though, what’s with the collar?
Here are some newer things from my collection from since I first posted this thread. The photos are original prints I have gotten within the past year. This isn’t everything I’ve gotten in this time, just the stuff I have online now. I’ve gotten quite a bit of insignia and original photos over the past few months, I need to get photos of most of it:

Probably not a correspondent one but it is a dedicated non-combatant jacket, which is very rare (and it’s a size 42). A correspondent very late in the war easily could have been seen in one of these:

And the WarCo memorial at Arlington, when I was there last year. It’s easy to find as it’s at the base of the path that leads you to the Space Shuttle crew graves and USS Maine mast, along the side of the main road:

And I’ve posted this elsewhere but I feel it belongs here as well. I was drawn into a comic book in 2009, as the character of “Sid Richardson” (named for my Grandfather, who wasn’t a correspondent, just thought my Mom would like her Dad’s name being used) for the DC series, “SGT Rock and the Lost Battalion” and artist Billy Tucci drew me from a photo I supplied to him, one of two times I appears in the series:

 

PHOTO LINKS NO LONGER WORK

-Daniel 1/23/18

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  • 5 months later...

I teamed up with local WW2 camera collector Bryan Ilyankoff to fill a tent this year for the local airshow with almost everything you'd encounter in the hands of a correspondent. Between the two of us, we had what I feel is one of the most complete gatherings on the subject seen in this region ever. We'd have made this much larger if it wasn't raining half the day and we knew ahead of time we'd need to leave some stuff at our homes:

 

PHOTO LINKS NO LONGER WORK

-Daniel 1/23/18

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Did you by any chance take some detailed shots of the PH-47?

I posted a few more here, but I didn't get too many detailed photos really because I don't need them of my own stuff, and I bet I can get photos of Bryan's stuff if I need to badly enough by driving to his place.

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Johan Willaert

Thanks Lee.

 

I would especially like to know more about the SpeedGraphic on the left in the picture below.

Obviously the PH47 and Combat Graphic on the right were Army issue since they have the dataplate and the orange SC inspection stamps.

The all black SG on the left does not have the dataplate nor the inspection stamp.

I would be curious about its Serial# and whether or not your friend knows if it was actually used by the Signal Corps.

I have a similar all black 1944 made SG camera which came in a full PH104 chest and supposedly was issued to the Army.

From what I've heard late in WW2 the Army started using straight off the shelve Speed Graphics which did not come with a PH47 dataplate.

I would appreciate your friend's opinion on that.

 

Cheers

post-92-1308670208.jpg

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  • 7 months later...
  • 2 months later...
willysmb44

A few new items...

 

PHOTO LINKS NO LONGER WORK

-Daniel 1/23/18

 

 

My plan for 2013 is Bryan and I (the guy with all the cameras in the above shots) will be doing a massive joint display of correspondent stuff at the MVPA convention in Portland, Oregon. Stay tuned!

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Jumpin Jack

I have a "23" Graphic camera, a smaller version of the Speed Graphic, plus a photo of the soldier taking a photo with this camera mounted with a telephoto lens. He carried the camera is an appropriate size case, but bearing the desig-nation "Naval Signal Light." I also have a large number of the photos he took to include a complete series of an Army detail digging up artillery duds in a Philippine city. Excellent quality photos! No nomenclature plate on the camera. Hope this might be of some help. Jack Angolia

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  • 1 month later...
Johan Willaert

Came across this picture showing Ernie Pyle wearing a (British black???) beret with US War Correspondent patch...

 

DOn't know if it was posted before but anyway here it is...

post-92-1340631686.jpg

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To be truly COMPLETE, your tent display needs a couple or three liquor/wine bottles...maybe a case-lot.

 

My Uncle Phil (AIR NEWS mag) told me that he hid film in wine bottles that had the bottoms cut out. He said the Powers That be controlled how many rolls of film each correspondent got/had. When/if they expended a roll -- AND turned it in for developing and concurrent censoring -- they got a fresh roll. But he brought a bunch of rolls from the ZI, and took a lot of "unofficial" shots, so always had rolls he wanted to hide. Eventually he would get photo recce unit labs to process his "unoffiical" rolls, then hide the negative strips to take them home.

 

So much for the EMPTY bottles.

 

He also had tales to tell of trafficking in booze, both for general social purposes and as trading material -- for hops to wherever he wanted to go, or to get aboard aircraft heading in harm's way when not approved, or as "bread and butter gifts" for his "hosts", i.e. a Brit aircraft carrier and USN PT boats.

 

BTW he had a Minox miniature camera and perhaps one of those small (half-frame) cameras I espy in your display. He took no-no shots -- such as identifiable Allied aircraft showing insignia, nose art, serials -- with these. [sorry, none these survived long enough to be passed my way.]

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  • 3 months later...
Johan Willaert

Don't know if you've seen this, Lee...

While surfing the net I came across this site about Wally Cohn and his modified Jeep (Site in Dutch but you get the picture...)

 

https://sites.google.com/site/eenlingen/victory-car

 

More pictures at:

http://images.google.com/search?hl=en&tbs=isch:1&q=wally+king+source:life&sa=N&start=0&ndsp=21&biw=1280&bih=705&sei=9a9_UP2fIIi3hAek1oFI&tbm=isch

 

 

 

Here's a picture showing Wally Cohn in his Non-Combattant 4 pocket tunic in 1946...

post-92-0-23047200-1350545478_thumb.jpg

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  • 1 month later...

This was taken at a private social event for my living history group this past weekend, we're standing in front of one of the "Tora Tora Tora" T-6 mockups... My wife shocked me a few days before by buying a reproduction 1940s dress (I never thought I'd be able to get her into 40s stuff!). We weren't able to get an idea for a '40s hairstyle, but I'm working on that idea for her...

UsandZero.jpg

Big plans are afoot for putting together probably the most complete war correspondent display ever seen, at the MVPA convention in Portland this July...

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  • 2 months later...

Just got confirmation that we have a display space at the MVPA Convention this year for the War Correspondent/Photographer display myself and another collector have been plotting on for over a year now!

PHOTO LINKS NO LONGER WORK

-Daniel 1/23/18

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  • 1 month later...

Hi Lee,

Great collection and impression. Last Sat., we had a local WW2 veteran speak at the local museum I volunteer for. He was in the 72nd Publicity service Btn. He had regular interactions with Andy Rooney, Edward R. Morrow and Ernest Hemingway. He met Ernie Pyle several times . He worked a little with Bob Keeshan (Captain Kangaroo). He was friends with Bill Mauldin. He is as sharp as a wip for a guy in his 80's. He first went to England where while he was out a buzz bomb hit the press camp and was completely destroyed.He was also privy to Operation Overlord and was locked up at "Buco West" until the day of the invasion and watched the fleet from hills of Portsmouth and turned 20 the next day. He crossed the channel a few weeks later and set up the first Press camp in an apple orchard. Then on to the Hotel Scribe in Paris where the next Press corp set up. From there to Belgium where Radio Belgium was. It had 200,000 watts at the time . The locals talked the exiting German troops not to blow it up. They broke the main crystals not knowing they had hidden an extra set. Here he worked with OSS. It was not far from the Ardennes.From there he crossed the Rhine and was sent to Dachau and Buchenwald.He taped the camps for the ABSE . In June of 45 he was in Berlin and he was in the Wansee region of Berlin where the next Press Corps was set up. He toured the Reichs Chancellery and the Hitlers bunker. He saw the blood soaked couch. He worked for NBC after the war for awhile and then an radio announcer near here. Of interest to you Lee, he had pictures of alot of Press camps. He had a mint press bag like you show. Most of the small camp pictures show just the red striped press bag hanging outside. He worked shortly with the French underground while in France.He had quite a few pieces of print propaganda put out by the US. He had a half a dozen large German medal documents that were blank but he unfortunately put his name in all of them . The documents he got at the bunker area. While at one of the rural Press camps , all the photographers were in the field and they made him take a picture of PM.Winston Churchill and Gen. Omar Bradley in the Press tent . He took it with a small camera he bought here in town before the war. That picture showed up in our local paper during WW2. His film was taken to be developed and put over the wire. That original picture is now for sale at a gallery in New York for $17,500 , author unknown (that will change now). There is a lady here that is doing his memoirs and most likely will have all the pictures in it. If you are interested , let me know.

Regards, Mitch

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Here is a grainy copy of the original photograph which was later signed by Winston Churchill.The local newspaper shows it without the autograph in 1944 or 5

Mitch

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