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Uncommon and Obscure Combat Patches Being Worn.


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1st Logistical Command combat patch worn by an Engineer Drill Instructor. Note he is wearing the SSI reversed on both his BDU's and dress greens with the arrow facing forward.

Technically not reversed. He just moved the arrow.

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Technically not reversed. He just moved the arrow.

Yes, I know the patch is not manufactured as a reversed patch. However, the approved manner of wearing it is with the arrow pointed at the 10:00 position, which is pointing forward when the patch is worn on the left sleeve but backwards if worn correctly as a combat patch. So by wearing it as a combat patch with the arrow pointing forward in the 2:00 position, it is technically reversed. That's all I meant.

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Yes, I know the patch is not manufactured as a reversed patch. However, the approved manner of wearing it is with the arrow pointed at the 10:00 position, which is pointing forward when the patch is worn on the left sleeve but backwards if worn correctly as a combat patch. So by wearing it as a combat patch with the arrow pointing forward in the 2:00 position, it is technically reversed. That's all I meant.

Gotcha. And I was just stating that when someone says ‘reversed’ its an actual patch with the item facing the opposite direction, like a right facing 101st.

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 3 weeks later...

Now here's a real early example of Bookend Patches, this being on Danial Stickler commander of the 28th Infantry Division, photo taken in Camp Atterbury Indiana in January 1951 (courtesy of the Pennsylvanian NG Museum)

 

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Strickler a Lancaster Pennsylvania native his whole life. served as an officer both in WWI and WWII in the 28th Infantry Division. In the 20s-30s however he goes into the reserves and is in the Pennsylvanian based 79th Division as a Colonel, 313th Infantry Commanding, back with the 28th after the war starts. accepting a reduction in rank to Lieutenant Colonel in order to command 1st Battalion, 112th Infantry Regiment. He later served as commander of 1st Battalion, 109th Infantry. In September 1944 he became commander of the 109th Infantry, which he led until December, when he was named to command of the 110th Infantry Regiment, which he led until the end of the war, again receiving promotion to colonel.

 

He becomes the Asst Div Cmdr as a Brigadier General, Strickler, a lawyer in civilian life, became Lieutenant Governor of the state (He served one term in the Pennsylvania House of Representatives 1931-33). He then sometime in December 1947 becomes the division commander. As his term as Lt Gov was coming to a close in the fall of 1950, he resigns and goes back on duty, still as a Major General and C.O. of his beloved Keystone Division, he takes it to Germany and commands it till December 1952, but remains on active duty, In Rome, in D.C, then in Japan, retiring in 1957! He passes at 95 in 1992 in Lancaster where he rests.

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Brig. Gen. Scott Jackson, left center, commander of the 1st Security Force Assistance Brigade, attends an Afghan-led battle update briefing Sept. 18, 2018.

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Now here's a real early example of Bookend Patches, this being on Danial Stickler commander of the 28th Infantry Division, photo taken in Camp Atterbury Indiana in January 1951 (courtesy of the Pennsylvanian NG Museum)

 

attachicon.giftcoo90.jpg

 

Strickler a Lancaster Pennsylvania native his whole life. served as an officer both in WWI and WWII in the 28th Infantry Division. In the 20s-30s however he goes into the reserves and is in the Pennsylvanian based 79th Division as a Colonel, 313th Infantry Commanding, back with the 28th after the war starts. accepting a reduction in rank to Lieutenant Colonel in order to command 1st Battalion, 112th Infantry Regiment. He later served as commander of 1st Battalion, 109th Infantry. In September 1944 he became commander of the 109th Infantry, which he led until December, when he was named to command of the 110th Infantry Regiment, which he led until the end of the war, again receiving promotion to colonel.

 

He becomes the Asst Div Cmdr as a Brigadier General, Strickler, a lawyer in civilian life, became Lieutenant Governor of the state (He served one term in the Pennsylvania House of Representatives 1931-33). He then sometime in December 1947 becomes the division commander. As his term as Lt Gov was coming to a close in the fall of 1950, he resigns and goes back on duty, still as a Major General and C.O. of his beloved Keystone Division, he takes it to Germany and commands it till December 1952, but remains on active duty, In Rome, in D.C, then in Japan, retiring in 1957! He passes at 95 in 1992 in Lancaster where he rests.

Maj Gen Stickler again to emphasize his bookend patches.

 

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  • 3 weeks later...

One of the DS Candidates in this 1971 Army Film, a Sergeant E-5 is wearing a 7th Inf Div Combat patch, seen at 7: 28 in the video, maybe Seanmc1114 can grab a Screen Capture, I don't know who to do that :lol: .

 

 

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One of the DS Candidates in this 1971 Army Film, a Sergeant E-5 is wearing a 7th Inf Div Combat patch, seen at 7: 28 in the video, maybe Seanmc1114 can grab a Screen Capture, I don't know who to do that :lol: .

 

 

Here it is. I had already posted this screenshot back in 2017 in post #2318599.

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Theater made 101st Airborne Division SSI with olive green shield and black eagle worn as a combat patch in Vietnam.

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BILL THE PATCH

Here's a great shot from a drill Sargent I think from fort Campbell. Abn cap patch on a baseball hat. He also had a 82nd abn patch on his left sleeve. Second photo you can see the other instructor also has cap patch on baseball hatPosted ImagePosted Image

 

Sent from my moto g(7) play using Tapatalk

 

 

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Here's a great shot from a drill Sargent I think from fort Campbell. Abn cap patch on a baseball hat. He also had a 82nd abn patch on his left sleeve. Second photo you can see the other instructor also has cap patch on baseball hat4c5bc4cb288ae5bcb4d33be0cae51333.jpg266eebe376adf164ca9a7eb81c875350.jpg

 

Sent from my moto g(7) play using Tapatalk

82nd's not a combat patch Billy Boy, wrong topic, but a great early photo for sure, got to be at the 82nd's Jump Course, these unit level course for refresher training or something, the 11th ran one in Germany, they had a patch right, this one.

 

post-6505-0-15891900-1479025725.jpg

 

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82nd's not a combat patch Billy Boy, wrong topic, but a great early photo for sure, got to be at the 82nd's Jump Course, these unit level course for refresher training or something, the 11th ran one in Germany, they had a patch right, this one.

 

post-6505-0-15891900-1479025725.jpg

 

He didnt say combat patch, he said left sleeve. Same instructor both pix though. He is wearing parachute garrison cap patch on his ball cap.
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He didnt say combat patch, he said left sleeve. Same instructor both pix though. He is wearing parachute garrison cap patch on his ball cap.

Yes I know that, but this topic is for Uncommon and Obscure Combat Patches, posted it in the wrong topic, Patches in Action should be but then we are guilty of this too, Seanmc1114 too, like us posting some patch or DI in the wrong one :lol:

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BILL THE PATCH

Yes, I was going with obscure . Seeing the abn cap patch on a baseball hat. I know not a combat patch but it is obscure being on the baseball hat.

 

Sent from my moto g(7) play using Tapatalk

 

 

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Yes, I was going with obscure . Seeing the abn cap patch on a baseball hat. I know not a combat patch but it is obscure being on the baseball hat.

 

Sent from my moto g(7) play using Tapatalk

Where are these from? look like there on TV, like you took pictures from a video you are were watching on TV, look like a we a Emerson logo or something there.

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  • 3 weeks later...

It's a little hard to make out, but the female soldier on the right is wearing an 8th Infantry Division combat patch soon after Desert Storm. The entire 8th did not serve in DS, but it did send four battalions - 4th Battalion, 34th Armor Regiment, 12th Engineer Battalion and 5th Battalion, 3rd Air Defense Artillery Regiment which were attached to the 3rd Armored Division and 2nd Battalion, 29th Field Artillery Regiment (155SP) attached to the 42nd Field Artillery Brigade - to the Gulf.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Military District Of Washington. The examples of this SSI I have previously posted being worn as a combat patch all had the HONOR GUARD tab which most likely indicated the soldier had deployed with Company B 1st Battalion 3rd Infantry to Djibouti in 2003-2004. Note this soldier is not wearing an HONOR GUARD tab with his combat patch.

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A Case of Bookend Patches! Could very well be as I think this is a photo of one of the Tank Troops of the 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment in 1970, note the 11th ACR patch on the combat side on this Tank Commander firing a M16 from the Cupola of his Patton Tank.

 

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