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Uncommon and Obscure Combat Patches Being Worn.


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I imagine this one must be pretty rare as a combat patch....

 

Military Assistance Advisory Group, Taiwan:

 

33c6mms.jpg

 

Under what circumstances would that be authorized as a combat patch? Do you have any information on the owner of the uniform?

 

 

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I don't know the exact reasons he would have worn the MAAG Taiwan patch as a combat patch. I had his service record, but it didn't mention anything about his time on Taiwan other than listing it as just another assignment. I'm sure there's a lot more to this than his service record let on, but I never was able to find out anything.

 

Here is a link to a thread I posted about this uniform a few years back:

http://www.usmilitariaforum.com/forums/index.php?/topic/47080-uniform-of-lt-col-ernest-stees/

 

If you scroll down, there is a black and white photo of him from his file that I got from the NPRC. Its hard to make out, but if you look closely, you can see he's wearing the MAAG Taiwan patch on his right shoulder in the photo.

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Under what circumstances would that be authorized as a combat patch?

 

 

Even though the Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal (authorized 1961) was awarded for qualifying service on Quemoy and Matsu Islands (23 August 1956 to 1 June 1963) and the Taiwan Straits (23 August 1958 to 1 January 1959), neither of these “designated U.S. military operations” entitled Army participants to wear what is now known as known as SSI-FWTS (source: survey of ARs covering Awards and Decorations and Uniform and Insignia going back to 1959). Here is an extract from the 1971 edition of AR 670-5, Uniform and Insignia, showing the covered areas as they stood then. Other areas have been added since, of course, but not the Formosa/Taiwan operations ca. 1950s-60s.

 

post-1963-0-64741300-1382318819.jpg

 

 

 

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Looks like an Occupation era US Forces Austria patch as a combat patch....

 

From the US Army Medical Museum Facebook page:

 

Colonel Joseph H. Akeroyd improved the storage, collection, and distribution of blood and blood components. Serving as a dedicated advocate, Colonel Akeroyd’s research and publications had a direct effect on saving lives. Appropriately, the blood donor center at Fort Sam Houston is memorialized in his honor.

During World War II Colonel Akeroyd was called to active duty on 13 May 1943. He served a...s a clinical laboratory officer and a biochemist. One of his first assignments was with the U.S. Army’s Ashburn General Hospital at McKinney, Texas in August of 1943. At that time, 1st Lieutenant Joseph H. Akeroyd served as Assistant Chief of the Laboratory Section for the hospital. Akeroyd would also serve with the 178th, 197th, and 124th General Hospitals in the European Theater.

From 1947 to 1952 Colonel Akeroyd served as a laboratory officer at Brooke General Hospital. During this assignment he began testing the utilization of plastic blood storage bags. His work led to improved transportation and storage as well as blood component separation. Instead of whole blood, plasma or platelets could be managed as needed for patient care....

 

558669_397696836964341_379996869_n.jpg

 

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  • 3 weeks later...
aussie digger

iowa_n10.jpg

 

Iowa national guard DCU with 2nd marine division combat patch. I believe this probably belonged to a member of the 224th Combat Engineer Battalion (Iowa Army National Guard) during there Jan-Dec 2005 deployment to Ramadi Iraq.

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36th Engineer Regiment SSI worn by John A. B. Dillard, Jr. who was later killed in Vietnam in 1970 when his helicopter was shot down while commanding the U. S. Army Engineer Command, Vietnam.

post-1761-0-41888500-1384364803.jpg

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Army Ground Forces. I can't recall seeing this as a combat patch before. At first I thought the negative may have been reversed, but you can tell it wasn't by looking at the license plate on the car in the background. Did any units outside the continental U.S. wear this SSI?

post-1761-0-57348000-1384804896.jpg

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Army Ground Forces. I can't recall seeing this as a combat patch before. At first I thought the negative may have been reversed, but you can tell it wasn't by looking at the license plate on the car in the background. Did any units outside the continental U.S. wear this SSI?

He also looks like he's Japanese, a Nisei. Not sure at all on the patch, too bad we can't see his ribbons, does it look like we see Overseas Bars?

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Army Ground Forces. I can't recall seeing this as a combat patch before. At first I thought the negative may have been reversed, but you can tell it wasn't by looking at the license plate on the car in the background. Did any units outside the continental U.S. wear this SSI?

Isn't there a patch that has the same design and is (I am guess here) orange-white-red and has the letters ATS in the middle? Can't tell if there is letters on the patch. Army Transport Service? If so, were they around then and could they have been overseas at all? Might be totally wrong on the whole deal too!

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attachicon.gif1st-style ASTP.jpg

I'm pretty sure I got this picture off the Forum and that it was IDed as 1st-design Advanced Specialized Training Program, but I can't find the post.

 

Whether it is Army Ground Forces or the AST patch, were either of them worn by any units permanently assigned to any combat theaters outside the U.S.?

 

I guess some AGF soldiers may have gone on overseas tours throughout the war and worn a combat patch based on that. After all, General Lesley J. McNair, commander of AGF, was killed in action in Normandy during Operation Cobra.

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Whether it is Army Ground Forces or the AST patch, were either of them worn by any units permanently assigned to any combat theaters outside the U.S.?

 

I guess some AGF soldiers may have gone on overseas tours throughout the war and worn a combat patch based on that. After all, General Lesley J. McNair, commander of AGF, was killed in action in Normandy during Operation Cobra.

That what I was thinking Sean, that this guy (who may be in fact Chinese rather than Japanese) was a clerk of somekind, perhaps an orderly, and accompanied these high ranking officers on there theater fact finding missions.

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That what I was thinking Sean, that this guy (who may be in fact Chinese rather than Japanese) was a clerk of somekind, perhaps an orderly, and accompanied these high ranking officers on there theater fact finding missions.

That makes a heck of alot more sense than what I was thinking!

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Not really a combat patch per se, here is a Red Cross worker wearing the SSI of the 7th Infantry Division on the right sleeve of her uniform in Korea. Presumably she is wearing the American Red Cross SSI on the left sleeve like the woman on the right.

post-1761-0-15180700-1385131946.jpg

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Very early M37 truck there....this was probably post cease-fire because of the M37 and the US Army name tapes....54-55 maybe?

Also a 10th Corps vehicle? notice the X on the bumper, at first I was going to say one for the 2nd Division's 38th Inf ( 7th Div patch worn by the Donut Dolly notwithstanding ) but here 38 may be a Corps Level unit, or it may simply be the vehicle's number

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I like the 3 star mud flaps.It could be part of the 10th Corps Commanding Generals vehicles?

Nah, that's for the Three Star Scotch they sold under the table, you know a secret sign that they had it for sale :lol: That's why everybody's smiling, well everybody except the Cpl on the left, he a teetotaler :lol:

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Unknown combat patch worn by an 82nd Airborne Division trooper in 1947. 508th Regimental Combat Team?

Certainly looks like it.

 

$T2eC16V,!zUE9s38+CCeBRO35LP3Cw~~60_35.J

 

 

 

 

 

 

This wearing of the PIR patch on the right of a non combat vet serving in a post war Airborne Inf Regt might be related to the one or two uniforms we've seen with the 11th Abn Div on the left, and the 503rd Rock patch on the right

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  • 2 weeks later...

Here’s one to make you stand on your head. This 40th MP Company sergeant on town patrol somewhere in upper Japan ca. summer of 1951 is wearing an upside-down I Marine Amphibious Corps patch (ca. 1943/44, attributed, various sources). For the record, he was a Marine during WWII and he did serve in the Pacific Theater.

 

post-1963-0-08040800-1386879741.jpg

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Here’s one to make you stand on your head. This 40th MP Company sergeant on town patrol somewhere in upper Japan ca. summer of 1951 is wearing an upside-down I Marine Amphibious Corps patch (ca. 1943/44, attributed, various sources). For the record, he was a Marine during WWII and he did serve in the Pacific Theater.

 

attachicon.gif40th MP Co. Sgt. 1MAC patch.jpg

:o:o:o

 

tkgrhqnhjdcfiznvjoovbsp0ve5w~~60_12.jpg?

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