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Uncommon and Obscure Combat Patches Being Worn.


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I love all of these photos! 5th RCT, a white bordered 99th Inf patch, Merrill's Marauders, you name it. Fun stuff!

 

-Ski

In Memory Of......
Pte Harold Griffiths, 1805, 1/6th Manchester Regt, KIA June 4th, 1915 in Gallipoli
Cpl Isaac Judges, 40494, 6th East Yorkshire Regt, KIA October 3rd, 1917 in Ypres
May they rest in peace.....

MSgt - USAF Retired

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Ref #224: A "BSB" has an MI Bn, a Cav Sqn and (often, if not always) an Inf Bn, plus some ash and trash support elements. IIRC it can be plussed-up with more Cav and/or Inf, "depending on the situation". I dunno, but I bin told: In effect, it is a way to create "very light" Brigades (in name only) for more Brigade-level command and staff slots, to look good on paper for promotion, while not "wasting" lots of troops/working-doggies on them.

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Had a feeling it had something to do with that.What are the primary MOS's for these type of units, Infantry or Intell?

Seems to be mostly MI, with one airborne infantry platoon. No personal knowledge, so this may be in error-- based on organisational structure. Google it, and you will find lots of info, though I haven't seen a full TOE yet.

 

FM 3-55.1 will probably tell you, but I don't have it available.

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Wow, those shots of GofA Bradley really emphasize how small the 12AG SSI is!

 

Also, props sean on the earlier patches! I really liked the 6th Army Alamo Scouts photos, as I just read quite a bit about them and Military Channel had a great show about them a few months ago. Incredible program for WWII era.

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The Airborne Command worn as a Combat Patch, or would it be Former Wartime Service, it's not a revese image, as one will note the front closure of the Ike. This Medical Administration? Officer was posted earlier in the photographs forum by tarbridge, who gave his kind consent to post it hear.

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The Airborne Command worn as a Combat Patch, or would it be Former Wartime Service, it's not a revese image, as one will note the front closure of the Ike. This Medical Administration? Officer was posted earlier in the photographs forum by tarbridge, who gave his kind consent to post it hear.

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Also note that neither the word Airborne in the tab nor the U.S. lapel insignia is reversed. Very interesting.

 

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Here's one that's not particularly obscure but that I think points out an interesting facet of how combat patches were worn in the early days. The picture is LTG Robert L. Eichelberger. He commanded the I Corps in the Southwest Pacific before taking command of the Eighth Army for the invasion of the Philippines. He remained in command of the Eighth through its postwar occupation of Japan until his retirement in 1948.

 

Notice that he is wearing the I Corps as his combat patch with the Eighth Army as his current assignment even though he also commanded the Eight in combat. It could just be a personal choice as to which of the two he would wear as a combat patch, but my guess is that in the early days of wearing combat patches, there was no provision for a "sandwich", that is wearing the same SSI as a current assignment and combat patch at the same time.

 

Any thoughts? Does anybody have any examples of the same patch on both sleeves from WWII?

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Also note that neither the word Airborne in the tab nor the U.S. lapel insignia is reversed. Very interesting.

 

Duh, that's the most important clue, somehow I was only focused on the fly front of the jacket, so the most glaring clue of it not being a reversed image eluded me :o

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Here's one that's not particularly obscure but that I think points out an interesting facet of how combat patches were worn in the early days. The picture is LTG Robert L. Eichelberger. He commanded the I Corps in the Southwest Pacific before taking command of the Eighth Army for the invasion of the Philippines. He remained in command of the Eighth through its postwar occupation of Japan until his retirement in 1948.

 

Notice that he is wearing the I Corps as his combat patch with the Eighth Army as his current assignment even though he also commanded the Eight in combat. It could just be a personal choice as to which of the two he would wear as a combat patch, but my guess is that in the early days of wearing combat patches, there was no provision for a "sandwich", that is wearing the same SSI as a current assignment and combat patch at the same time.

 

Any thoughts? Does anybody have any examples of the same patch on both sleeves from WWII?

Fantastic question, sean! I eagerly wait to see an answer, but I do have a thought:

 

Up to May/June 1945 (in Europe - later in Pacific), most front-line troops never wore dress uniforms. When the war ended, there was great unit upheaval due to guys getting discharged, if they had the points (which benefitted combat troops), they went home, got discharged and probably didn't think about a combat SSI. If the soldier didn't have the points, and served occupation duty, there was a good chance he may have moved to another unit, and hense, a different combat SSI than his current assignment. Likewise, when Korea broke out, there were probably few WWII vets that served in the same unit. This, of course, is not universal. I'm wagering someone will find a post-WWII pic of someone with "bookends," but I also bet it's rarer than we'd think.

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Here's one i've never seen before.I'm sure he did have a combat 3rd ID patch when he was with the Texas NG.Not sure what the badge on his right pocket is for in the above post?

 

 

Badge looks French, not sure exactly what it is though.

Rev. Jake

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That photo of Eichelberger is easy to explain, when this photo was taken Eichelberger was still in command of 8th Army in Japan ( despite the July 1950 date on the signed photo, here Eichelberger was no doubt just handing out old photos of himself, Walker was CO of 8th Army as we know in July 1950, and in combat over in Korea) He just was wearing the I Corps patch to show his former combat command is all. It would after Eichelberger left the command of 8th Army that would prove interesting, which patch would he wear then, 8th Army, or I Corps.

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I don't know guys. I spent a couple hours looking through photos of Audie on Google, and never found one which clearly showed his right sleeve while he was still in the 3rd. Most of the photos, unfortunately, were cropped JUST tight enough to see neither SSI. Maybe I'm barking up the wrong tree...

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Audie+Murphy+in+Class+A+uniform.JPG

 

This is the one I posted.You can see he has a combat patch on his right sleeve.It was the only one I could find that showed something.It is hard to make out but we all know he was with the 3rd ID.Look's like a bullion type?

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ASMIC #1098

 





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I don't think 3rd infantry division qualifies as being uncommon.

 

 

This is true.3rd ID is far from uncommon.We were just trying to answer a question from MMA10MM.Probably should be in a different forum.

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ASMIC #1098

 





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