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Liner chinstrap WW2 period


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I still haven't figured out when a liner chinstrap is considered to be a WW2 chinstrap. I've consulted several topics about it and read things concerning Dot/United Carr marked rivets, brass vs steel buckles and the presence of an anchor under the flip tab of the buckle, green vs black painted etc. Still a lot of discussion/haziness on some points.

 

So my question: when is a liner chinstrap to be considered as a WW2 chinstrap?

 

Thank you in advance.

At the going down of the sun and in the morning, We will remember them.

 

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It's complicated. You need to post a pic if you have one in mind. If you are looking for general concepts, then you look at all the elements you identified and draw a conclusion from the total package.

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Here's a summary, I'll keep it short.

 

You can be sure your strap is WWII era if it:

 

1. has rivets that are marked UNITED CARR.

 

2. has steel hardware on it (that means it will hold a magnet) which is painted in either green or brown and has a flap lit or a curved lip

 

3. has brass hardware on it (blackened brass, won't hold a magnet) with a curved lip with or without patent number on the back of the buckle lever. Without number: late half of 1944, others late 1944 or early 1945.

 

That's basically it... There still is too much uncertainty about the Dot marked rivets and those with anchors on them.. I hope one day we'll be sure. You can't go wrong with what's described above.

 

Sometimes you'll find straps that have mixed parts on them.. like early straps with green buckle and brown rivets, which indicated that manufacturers used up their stocks. Or straps with brass buckles and steel rivets that are painted in black, which would be a post war mix.

 

Sometimes you'll find straps with WWII characteristics but with unmarked rivets. A lot is possible. If you want to be sure... Get a textbook example.

 

Best regards

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"The battle belonged that morning to the thin wet line of khaki that dragged itself ashore on the channel coast of France." - General Omar Bradley.

 

 

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Here's a summary, I'll keep it short.

 

You can be sure your strap is WWII era if it:

 

1. has rivets that are marked UNITED CARR.

 

2. has steel hardware on it (that means it will hold a magnet) which is painted in either green or brown and has a flap lit or a curved lip

 

3. has brass hardware on it (blackened brass, won't hold a magnet) with a curved lip with or without patent number on the back of the buckle lever. Without number: late half of 1944, others late 1944 or early 1945.

 

That's basically it... There still is too much uncertainty about the Dot marked rivets and those with anchors on them.. I hope one day we'll be sure. You can't go wrong with what's described above.

 

Sometimes you'll find straps that have mixed parts on them.. like early straps with green buckle and brown rivets, which indicated that manufacturers used up their stocks. Or straps with brass buckles and steel rivets that are painted in black, which would be a post war mix.

 

Sometimes you'll find straps with WWII characteristics but with unmarked rivets. A lot is possible. If you want to be sure... Get a textbook example.

 

Best regards

 

Very nice summary. You talk a lot about using magnets (good idea) - I guess I'll have steal one off of the refrigerator and start using it.

Looking for EXPERIMENTAL & PROTOTYPE HELMETS

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