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Meyer: N.S. Meyer


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Thanks for posting all those! Feel free to post any other examples too! All I ask is that each person try to include an approximate date. I'm going to eventually move a thread like this into a REFERENCE section on hallmarks. :)

 

On each I noticed the shield, but while searching under MEYER on ebay I came across the below DI. It says it is World War II from a World War II vet. I don't see a mark like this mentioned at all above.

 

Any ideas on this one?

 

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Squad leader
Thanks for posting all those! Feel free to post any other examples too! All I ask is that each person try to include an approximate date. I'm going to eventually move a thread like this into a REFERENCE section on hallmarks. :)

 

On each I noticed the shield, but while searching under MEYER on ebay I came across the below DI. It says it is World War II from a World War II vet. I don't see a mark like this mentioned at all above.

 

Any ideas on this one?

 

I read somewhere that N.S. Meyer used sterling during WWII when brass became a strategical material in 1943. I assume they stopped the production when war ended.

 

Dan.

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I read somewhere that N.S. Meyer used sterling during WWII when brass became a strategical material in 1943. I assume they stopped the production when war ended.

 

Dan.

 

Hadn't heard that. That's interesting. Anyone else know anything about this?

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teufelhunde.ret

With respect to EGA's, that is correct and my understanding is most of those whom produced EGA's did the same and or revered to Bakelite and in pot metals of other metals that were not in such high demand during the war... will see if I can find picture and post. thumbsup.gif s/f Darrell

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  • 2 weeks later...
Here is some information posted by GLM in another forum:

 

http://www.wehrmacht-awards.com/forums/sho...highlight=meyer

 

post-311-1204411592.jpg

 

These illustrations are from an article I wrote for the Trading Post back in 1986 as a first stab at trying to date hallmarks. Needless to say, they are somewhat out of date, but they and the article did hit a chord. In the early 1990s, prodded by Paul O'Dowd, a number of DI collectors systematically surveyed our collections to see how educated our guesses actually were. When it came to Meyer, we turned up close to 50 variations, mostly minor variants of the basic types illustrated in the article. The most glaring error in my article was in dating raised hallmarks with "N.Y.C." under the name and above the shield. The late '40s early '50s original estimate was based on the mark being found on some postwar pieces, e.g., the MP School. However, it turned up on a number of WW2 pieces such as the 893rd TD Bn, HD of Chesapeake Bay, some AAF pieces whose names escape me, etc. One of these days I'll update my article, but then again I've said that for 15 years ...

 

The most important thing to keep in mind was that Meyer (and Dondero) were jobbers who subcontracted DI manufacturing to other small firms. This explains why so many hallmarks existed contemporaneously. WW2, for example, saw the "N.S. Meyer, Inc. / New York" above the shield in both incised and raised; the name and place alongside the shield (in two lines); the name and place in three lines beside the shield; and the "NYC" variant. Several of these added "sterling" when the manufacture of brass DI was forbidding in late 1942.

 

Among the changes/additions to the 1986 chart I would make today are:

 

1. The earliest Meyer hallmark may be a two line "N.S.MEYER,INC / NEW-YORK" in an art nouveauish font without a shield (found on the 1st CA and 6th Composite Gp DIs, indicating a jobber who got the contract for early DIs worn in Panama)

 

2. Another early one is "Meyer Metal" in two lines with an arrow between the words. This one is also seen in a lot of brass from the 1920s and 1930s.

 

3. One for c. 1940-42 is a three line raised hallmark "N.S. Meyer / Inc / New York" found on a number of DIs including the 501st Pcht Inf Bn (thunderbird) worn only in 1940-41, dumped for the plastic indian head when the Bn was expanded into a regt, the original design not reappearing until the mid 1950s when the 501st (inactive since 1946) was reactivated.

 

-- Bob Capistrano

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Hadn't heard that. That's interesting. Anyone else know anything about this?

 

This is true. Several of the big DI companies switched to sterling for a short while in 1943, including Meyer, Dondero, and Newcome. The plastic DI also first appeared around this time, principally by Whitehead & Hoag but also used by Gemsco (AAF Tech Tng Cmd; 501st PIR), as did cloth issues (e.g., 612th, 802nd, 827th TD Bns)

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teufelhunde.ret

NS Meyers hallmark on EGA for Officers service dress collars, early/mid 20's production with Meyer Metal & fire bronze hallmarks, very unique design / hallmarks. Seldom seen. Currently in the collection of Mike Manifor.

ns_meyer_fire_bronze_19020_3.jpg

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teufelhunde.ret

NS Meyers hallmark on EGA for enlisted dress blues barracks cover, early/mid 20's production with Meyer Metal symbol too, very unique design. Seldom seen.

william_1920_fake4.jpg

william_1920_fake3.jpg

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teufelhunde.ret

NS Meyers hallmark on EGA for enlisted dress blue collars, mid 20's production with Meyer Metal logo, very unique design / hallmarks. Seldom seen.

DSC06382A.jpg

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teufelhunde.ret

A prolific maker of swords from from 1875 to 1992, they also were know for their Wing and EGA production. Sadly in the early 1990's they became embroiled with the Federal Government on charges of conspiracy to suppress and eliminate competition in unreasonable restraint of interstate and foreign trade and commerce, which lead to their demise. Soon after, Vanguard Industries and the Ira Green Company were embroiled in arbitration over use of the N.S. Meyer name, eventually Vanguard took over the trade name. I hope someone will be willing to fill-in some of the gaps. Shown here are various hallmark uses.

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NS_Meyer_hallmark.jpg

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Just received a mint set of post 54 clutch back EGA's on original card. They have a crude Meyer shield on the back. see the following for pics

S/F

John

post-5056-1230760703.jpg

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teufelhunde.ret

Interesting WW1 era "coffin style" design Captain bar with sterling hallmark. Note the side load clasp.

 

a79b_3.jpg 9f54_3.jpg

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