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Are these double buckle boots WWII?


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Yes, but give that US headed serial number indicates that Spengler was a post WWII serving GI, any time after 1946 till ? 1953 or there abouts, after that date the WWII buckle top boots were basicaly superceaded by the new Brown High top combat boots, though they were no doubt continued to worn a little later by those that had them as a field foot gear.

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The rivet indicates those boots are very early. The first group of double buckle boots were actually field shoes that had that rivet. The double buckle top was added to the shoes. I'm not sure how long the rivet continued in use after they started making them as double buckle rather than converting older shoes.

 

Early boot:

 

post-5-0-37835400-1357764058.jpg

 

Later boot:

 

post-5-0-40392500-1357764075.jpg

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Yes, but give that US headed serial number indicates that Spengler was a post WWII serving GI, any time after 1946 till ? 1953 or there abouts, after that date the WWII buckle top boots were basicaly superceaded by the new Brown High top combat boots, though they were no doubt continued to worn a little later by those that had them as a field foot gear.

 

So these are WWII but used post war?

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The rivet indicates those boots are very early. The first group of double buckle boots were actually field shoes that had that rivet. The double buckle top was added to the shoes. I'm not sure how long the rivet continued in use after they started making them as double buckle rather than converting older shoes.

 

Early boot:

 

post-5-0-37835400-1357764058.jpg

 

Later boot:

 

post-5-0-40392500-1357764075.jpg

 

You say they are early boots, HOWEVER... i have read that the white lining in the cuffs is late.

 

Hm, i will definetly buy these if that is the case then.

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I forgot to mention the fact that they are dyed black indicates use after 1956.

 

I just saw some dyed black ones on Ebay dated '43 and wondered why someone would dye them that colour...

 

At first I thought it was just through age and dubbing etc...

 

Thanks!

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I forgot to mention the fact that they are dyed black indicates use after 1956.

 

craig, these boots Airborne1944 posted are dyed Black? I too thought these are just real dark from age etc.

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Those look alot darker though.

 

In the pictures it appears there is no signs of dye being used (no blobs on the interior)

 

Are the soles on my ones post war? They look odd.

 

Also nexr to the size stamp it is stamped JV, does that mean anything?

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craig, these boots Airborne1944 posted are dyed Black? I too thought these are just real dark from age etc.

 

 

They could just be really dark from dubbing them over and over again....plus the dirt and grime that would build up over time as well.

 

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"The only thing necessary for evil to flourish is for good men to do nothing."
Edmund Burke


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As to whether your boots are dyed black or if they have just had lots of dubbing applied, you should be able to determine this by examining the inside. If there was black dye it is a good chance it will show up on the inside somewhere. The Army issued a recall on dubbing just at the end of the war. It was destroying the boots. Another tell on your boots is they have black laces. If you look at mine the dyed boots have black laces but the two pair of brown boots I posted have brown laces. Of course as always each of us is free to believe what ever we want.

 

The soles on your boots are hard to determine because they are worn out and any signs of details to determine maker, etc. is gone.

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I wondering why these boots wear dyed Black, I imagine that they were dyed Black to conform with the change over to Black boots in late 1956 through 1957-58, most likely by some old timer, I can't imagine anyone else going the the trouble of doing this, newer men would have at least the high top Brown boots and dye them or just gent a brand new speficially made pair Black Combat Boots.

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I have read that recruits were issued one pair of the M1949 boots and one pair of double buckle boots until late 50's or early 60's. I don't think the new issue black boots arrived until 1962. They were ordered to dye their boots after 1956.

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Post-war, a kind of "waterproof" coating was applied to many buckle boots...I have just such a pair. It has the effect of darkening the boots (dark brown) and, as I understand it, was meant to give the boots a more presentable "garrison look" rather than the rough-out field service look.

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"We shall defend our island, whatever the cost may be. We shall fight on the beaches, we shall fight on the landing grounds, we shall fight in the fields and in the streets, we shall fight in the hills; we shall never surrender!"

 

Winston Churchill

" Life is what happens to you when you're busy making other plans."

John Winston Lennon

 

 

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I'm thinking dye Craig, because of the uniform colour of the boot cuffs!

"We shall defend our island, whatever the cost may be. We shall fight on the beaches, we shall fight on the landing grounds, we shall fight in the fields and in the streets, we shall fight in the hills; we shall never surrender!"

 

Winston Churchill

" Life is what happens to you when you're busy making other plans."

John Winston Lennon

 

 

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If post war, does this mean the boots were MADE post war or they were just issued post war?

 

I think I will buy these, considering it is for re-enactment use and the fact they have rivets... i have looked at other buckle boots for sale and they do not so when these are covered up with leggings they will look exactly like service shoe roughouts and a lot cheaper too.

 

The seller does label them as black ones, but says they are vintage 1940's WWII ones.

 

I will need to replace laces anyway as one boot has them missing so will get correct WWII ones, however I think I have seen those exact laces on WWII examples aswell...

 

Do you guys think these are dyed? Would I be able to remove the dye possibly?

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