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RON 22 patch


88thcollector
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88thcollector

this is what it says online: Commissioned: 10,November 1943 - LCDR Richard J. Dressling

Decommissioned: 15,November 1945 - LCDR Richard J. Dressling

PT Boats: Higgins 78' PT's 302-313

Assigned To: Mediterranean

Postscript: The squadron was operating under the British Coastal Forces, and saw action along the northwest cost of Italy and southern coast of France. In April of 1945 the squadron was shipped to the U.S. for refitting and transfer to the Pacific, but the war ended while still in New York.

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Johnny Signor

Yeah , I kind of thought that too , but the bird kind of leads you to think "avaition" rather than sea borne mission, good to know, thanks !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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oh,

 

PT boat crews usually shortened squadron to "ron." The Army and Marine already had squads so they used RON.

 

COOL.....it's all starting to make sense too me now!! ;)

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This may be of interest to some...

 

I have a collection of 150+ letters written by Lt. (j.g) Gerald F. Hart. He served with Motor Torpedo Squadron 22, which operated in the Mediterranean Theater. A handful of the letters were written when he was an ensign at Dartmouth College, but the remainder were from the time the squadron headed to the MTO to when he was to return to the States. Hart was the Radar Officer for the squadron and at one time was the Base Executive Officer. Content of the letters suggest he earlier served on PT-313 in the squadron. The following bio comes from the PT boats history "Knights of the Sea."

 

"GERALD F. HART, Lt., Ron 22. Born in Brewer, Maine, 2-23-17. Graduate U of Maine 1938 with electrical engineering degree. Joined Naval Reserve Nov. 1942 as ensign with engineering electronics classification. Assigned to Dartmouth College for "60-day wonder" orientation in mid-winter '42-'43 followed by six-month "super-secret" radar training at Harvard and Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Assigned temporary duty at Norfolk Naval Shipyard and thence to permanent with Base Force RON 22 (obviously not a PT professional!) for commissioning at New Orleans, LA. Received commendation for rescue of Army personnel from swamped boats on training maneuvers in Lake Ponchartrain. Ron shipped out of Norfolk early 1944 for patrol duty in Mediterranean landing at Oran, Algeria. Moved via Bizerte up to headquarters base at Maddalena on Sardinia and thence to operating base at Batista on island of Corsica. Following invasion of Southern France, advanced operating bases were established at Golfe Juan on the Gold Coast between Cannes and Nice, also at Leghorn (Livorno) Italy. Ron 22 conducted reconnaissance patrols off the French-Italian coast frequently encountering small submarines, Italian patrol boats and escort craft. One boat was lost and several casualties suffered from contact with a mine. Assignments also involved protective patrol operations near General Eisenhower's rest area at Cap D'Antibes."

 

During the invasion of Southern France ("Operation Dragoon"), the squadron was attached to the British Navy and delivered French commandos in a diversionary attack east of the beaches. In charge of this part of the operation was Lt. CDR Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. He is mentioned in a few of Hart's letters. Hart and the technicians of his radar "unit" did frequent work on British and French ships and boats. On one occasion he was called to Rome to meet with members of the Royal Nav

 

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The diversionary operation east of the landing beaches (on the "pointe de l'Esquillon") was conducted by the french "Groupe Naval d'Assaut" , a navy commando unit. The operation was a complete disaster, as the commandos landed on a heavily mined rock coast.

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