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Warrant Officer Ranks

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"GREETINGS & SALUTATIONS!" The main thrust of my collection is that of foreign and United States Armed Forces warrant officer rank insignia past and present. I can never find enough variations, can you? A warrant officer was considered neither fowl nor fish, somewhere between enlisted grades and commissioned ranks; or is it the other way around? Below is a raised fake gold bullion embroidery metal bar with the centre filled with blue enamel, worn by U.S. Marine warrant officers, maybe U.S. Mavy too before WW2? Then there are the embroiered cloth rank insignia for the first style of U.S. Army warrant and chief warrant officers. Also Vietnam era warrant officer cloth badges. w00t.gif Sarge Booker of Tujunga, California ( hhbooker2@yahoo.com )

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Herbert Booker

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Flight Officer of the U.S. Army Air Corps wore these blue enameled warrant officer bars. Junior Warrant Officer U.S. Navy wore these small gold bars with a thin blue stripe in the centre. :rolleyes:

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Herbert Booker

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Warrant Officer. The Top right is Vietnam, top left is Subdued for the BDU and the bottom one is the Desert one for the DCU. These type patches are now obsolete.

Andrew

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Warrant Officer One (WO1) . On the left, you have two uncut WO1 ranks and on the right you have the Subdued rank tab for WO1 that goes on the BDU Gore-tex jacket.

Andrew

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Chief Warrant Officer Two (CW2) . On the left, is a pair of uncut collar insignia for Chief Warrant Officer Two. They are Desert subdued for wear on the DCU. On the right is a CW2 rank that is Early Vietnam era. It is color, yet it is worn on the fatuiges.

Andrew

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Chief Warrant Officer Three (CW3) . Desert Subdued for wear on the DCU. Collar insignia, uncut from the factory.

Andrew

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Army Field Manual 22-100, Army Leadership, 31 August 1999, defined the role of Army Warrant Officers as:

 

"Warrant officers are highly specialized, single-track specialty officers who receive their authority from the Secretary of the Army upon their initial appointment. However, Title 10 U.S.C. authorizes the commissioning of warrant officers (WO1) upon promotion to chief warrant officer (CW2). These commissioned warrant officers are direct representatives of the President of the United States. They derive their authority from the same source as commissioned officers but remain specialists, in contrast to commissioned officers, who are generalists. Warrant officers can and do command detachments, units, activities, and vessels as well as lead, coach, train, and counsel subordinates. As leaders and technical experts, they provide valuable skills, guidance, and expertise to commanders and organizations in their particular field."

 

(Para. A-3, Army Field Manual 22-100)

 

Any Questions?

This is pretty interesting. My uncle was a retired CW2 in the Army, but unfortunately I never really knew him and he's passed on so I can't ask him about what he did. However, his one business card I have said he was "Special Agent in Charge" of the Bayonne, NJ CID office. I'm guessing that's what this part of the above regulation covers:

 

"Warrant officers can and do command detachments, units, activities..."

 

I don't know if he was a Commissioned Warrant Officer or not. Was that something that was automatic, or did it vary based on MOS?

 

I'll have to post pics of his greens and blues as soon as I have a chance, too.


Jeff C.

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Most Aviation warrants that I knew preferred the term "Mister" over "Chief". I have been told it was at least partly due to in the aviation world crew chiefs were often referred to as "chief". Depending on the person, we would still call them "Chief" if we wanted to mess with them a little. I don't ever recall any warrants from other branches objecting to the title "Chief".

 

I always called warrants "Sir" when appropriate as any other officer. Warrants can be an enlisted persons best friend and were always great to work for. As on CW5 once told me, an officer will tell you to go do something, but a warrant will tell you to go do something, then roll up his (or her) sleeves and help you do it. That proved true many times.

 

Most warrants I ever knew were highly respected by both the officer and enlisted personnel. They are an invaluable asset to the Army for their technical knowledge and expertise.

 

My Dad got his warrant in July '66 and retired as a CW3 in 1972. So I've always had an affection and respect for warrant officers. The warrant officer force has changed and evolved quite a bit in the last few years. Commissioning the CW2 thru CW5 ranks strengthens their future with the Army in my opinion. Although I did think it was kind of sad when the "eagle rising" insignia was replaced with individual's branch insignia.

 

Just my .02 cents worth....

 

Laury


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Thought I'd post some examples of the insignia worn on my Uncle John's dress blues.

 

Shoulder boards:

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Cover:

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Lapel insignia:

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His business card (stuck inside the cover):

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Jeff C.

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This is pretty interesting. My uncle was a retired CW2 in the Army, but unfortunately I never really knew him and he's passed on so I can't ask him about what he did. However, his one business card I have said he was "Special Agent in Charge" of the Bayonne, NJ CID office. I'm guessing that's what this part of the above regulation covers:

 

"Warrant officers can and do command detachments, units, activities..."

 

I don't know if he was a Commissioned Warrant Officer or not. Was that something that was automatic, or did it vary based on MOS?

 

I'll have to post pics of his greens and blues as soon as I have a chance, too.

 

Jeff,

 

The provisions for commissioning warrants came down around 1987 or 1988 if I remember correctly. It was automatic once promoted to CW2.

 

Jim K.


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Looking for original photos and other items from the First World War US 77th Infantry Division.

Also interested in BAR and M1917A1 BMG related items.

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Insignia placement on his service dress greens:

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Soft shoulder boards on the green shirt:

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Jeff C.

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Jeff,

 

The provisions for commissioning warrants came down around 1987 or 1988 if I remember correctly. It was automatic once promoted to CW2.

 

Jim K.

Thanks, Jim! That was a few years after my uncle retired, so he was definitely not a Commissioned Warrant Officer.


Jeff C.

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Most Aviation warrants that I knew preferred the term "Mister" over "Chief". I have been told it was at least partly due to in the aviation world crew chiefs were often referred to as "chief". Depending on the person, we would still call them "Chief" if we wanted to mess with them a little. I don't ever recall any warrants from other branches objecting to the title "Chief".

 

I always called warrants "Sir" when appropriate as any other officer. Warrants can be an enlisted persons best friend and were always great to work for. As on CW5 once told me, an officer will tell you to go do something, but a warrant will tell you to go do something, then roll up his (or her) sleeves and help you do it. That proved true many times.

 

Most warrants I ever knew were highly respected by both the officer and enlisted personnel. They are an invaluable asset to the Army for their technical knowledge and expertise.

 

My Dad got his warrant in July '66 and retired as a CW3 in 1972. So I've always had an affection and respect for warrant officers. The warrant officer force has changed and evolved quite a bit in the last few years. Commissioning the CW2 thru CW5 ranks strengthens their future with the Army in my opinion. Although I did think it was kind of sad when the "eagle rising" insignia was replaced with individual's branch insignia.

 

Just my .02 cents worth....

 

Laury

 

Laury,

 

You are absolutely correct regarding the reason WO in aviation units were referred to as Mister. Mister was considered a term of respect where chief was not. The term Chief was usually used by those outside of aviation units who did not understand the inner workings of a unit that included crew chiefs.

 

Aviation warrants more identified with Aviation Branch than the warrant officer branch so the change was not that big a deal for a lot of us. At one time the idea was kicked around of eliminating the WO rank and giving WO the equivalent commissioned officer rank. When the Army calculated how much it was going to cost in pay raises they dropped the idea. Seems they liked cheap labor. :)

 

Thanks for the kind words regarding WOs.

 

Jim K.


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Looking for original photos and other items from the First World War US 77th Infantry Division.

Also interested in BAR and M1917A1 BMG related items.

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Right or wrong, I've always addressed Warrant Officers as either Sir or Ma'am.

 

When referring to a Commissioned Officer I would use their title, Captain or Major Smith.

 

When referring to a Warrant Officer I would use either Mr. or Ms Smith.

 

I've never heard anyone address a Warrant as Chief Warrant Officer Three Smith.

 

Having been in the Medical Field, I worked with many Warrant Officers back before the Physician Assistants became Commissioned Officers and with dustoff units I was with both Commissioned and Warrant pilots. I was never told that how I addressed someone was wrong, I did observe that within the Medical field "Chief" was okay to use but, around the Aviation units most enlisted did not call a Warrant "Chief".

 

Like it was said before Warrants were not afraid to jump in and show you how to do a task or help you do it. thumbsup.gif I've had Commissioned Officers stand around reading aloud how to do a task and then become upset when it did not come out right.

 

I could always tell those that knew everything in the book vs those that had done evrything in that book. :lol:

 

Bill


Please visit my sell / trade pages

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Laury,

 

You are absolutely correct regarding the reason WO in aviation units were referred to as Mister. Mister was considered a term of respect where chief was not. The term Chief was usually used by those outside of aviation units who did not understand the inner workings of a unit that included crew chiefs.

 

Aviation warrants more identified with Aviation Branch than the warrant officer branch so the change was not that big a deal for a lot of us. At one time the idea was kicked around of eliminating the WO rank and giving WO the equivalent commissioned officer rank. When the Army calculated how much it was going to cost in pay raises they dropped the idea. Seems they liked cheap labor. :)

 

Thanks for the kind words regarding WOs.

 

Jim K.

 

 

Jim,

 

I was in the Air Force before my time in the Army. We called our Chief Master Sergeants "Chief", which was a term of respect. They used the indian chief symbols for many years before its use was discouraged by the Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force about 3 years ago. Granted some of them did take it a little too far. As far as I know, the Army warrant officers have never used the indian symbolism.

 

Like my Dad has always said, a 2nd LT may technically outrank a chief warrant officer, but you better not let the warrant officer hear them say it. :)

 

Have a good one!

 

Laury


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Does anyone know when the Air Force stopped using WO's? I have a '61 dated Air Force Officers Uniform that I obtained directly from the veterans estate that is named to him with the rank on the uniform label listed as CWO Byron B Todd


Cpl James A Paris, USMC
Stinger Missile Gunner
H&S Co. Support Bn MCRDSD 2002-2003

MarDet Ft Bliss, TX 2003
2nd Plt 1st Stinger Btry, Okinawa 2003-2004
2nd Plt A Btry 3rd LAAD BN Camp Pendleton, CA 2004-2006

Please visit my blog: http://ourcountrysheroes.blogspot.com/

 

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About the use of "SIR". The Officer's Commission from, and signed by the President of U.S.A.: states, & makes the man an Officer, and a GENTLEMAN, and the term "SIR" (in the military) is reserved for these commissioned Gentlemen.

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About the use of "SIR". The Officer's Commission from, and signed by the President of U.S.A.: states, & makes the man an Officer, and a GENTLEMAN, and the term "SIR" (in the military) is reserved for these commissioned Gentlemen.

 

Bob, maybe when you were in only commissioned officers were addressed as Sir but in the Army today all officers, commissioned or warrant are addressed as sir by the enlisted folks. The information I am working with is current.

 

Now using your standard, if it is reserved for commission officers:

 

These commissioned warrant officers are direct representatives of the President of the United States. They derive their authority from the same source as commissioned officers....

 

With that being the case, Sir would be appropriate for Warrant Officers.

 

One other point, I know the drill from both sides of the fence. My first 10 years I was commissioned in the Regular Army, I resigned my commission as a Captain (P) to accept a job with the National Guard as an instructor pilot in 1989. I retired from the Guard after 17 years in 2006.


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Looking for original photos and other items from the First World War US 77th Infantry Division.

Also interested in BAR and M1917A1 BMG related items.

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Does anyone know this maker mark on these early WO insignia?

it looks like an oval with a F inside and four little legs sticking out from the oval

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Cpl James A Paris, USMC
Stinger Missile Gunner
H&S Co. Support Bn MCRDSD 2002-2003

MarDet Ft Bliss, TX 2003
2nd Plt 1st Stinger Btry, Okinawa 2003-2004
2nd Plt A Btry 3rd LAAD BN Camp Pendleton, CA 2004-2006

Please visit my blog: http://ourcountrysheroes.blogspot.com/

 

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Can anyone can show Me a photo (no typed statement ~ please) of the page(s) in ARMY Regulations; that state WO are addressed as SIR? I'd also like to see regulation about "commissioned" WO; as I am not familiar with that change.

 

>>> I had two good Friends who were WO helicopter pilots (101st Huey Medi-vac, & a CH-47 pilot): We called each other by Our first Names; unless in the presence of EM.

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Does anyone know when the Air Force stopped using WO's? I have a '61 dated Air Force Officers Uniform that I obtained directly from the veterans estate that is named to him with the rank on the uniform label listed as CWO Byron B Todd

The Air Force stopped making Warrant Officers in 1958 when the Armed Forces created the E-8 and E-9 enlisted pay grades. The Warrant Officers in the USAF were all promoted to CWO-4 and attritioned out over the years. Most were either retired or gone on to become comissioned officers by the late 1960's, but a few continued on until I believe the last USAF Warrant Officer retired in the 1980's. (I think I remember that he was either ANG or Reserve.)

I was on a SAC base in the late 1960's and we had only one Warrant Officer on base as I remember it.


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If anyone can show Me a photo (no typed statement ~ please) of the page(s) in ARMY Regulations; that state WO are addressed as SIR: I'll then believe it. I'd also like to see regulation about "commissioned" WO; as I am not familiar with that change. >>> I had two good Friends who were WO helicopter pilots (101st Huey Medi-vac, & a CH-47 pilot): We called each other by Our first Names; unless in the presence of EM. Just want You all to know: I have nothing against WO; just interested in military correctness.

 

More information:

 

Commissioned Warrant officers - Para. A-3, Army Field Manual 22-100, FM 22-100, or you can look here - http://www.penfed.com/usawoa/WOHERITAGE/ArmyWOdefined.htm or here - http://www.virtualarmory.com/newsoldier/warrant/

 

The Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1986 amended Title 10 of the United States Code (U.S.C.) to provide that Army Chief Warrant Officers shall be appointed by Commission. The primary purpose of the legislation was to equalize appointment procedures among the services. Chief Warrant Officers of the Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard had been commissioned for many years. Contrary to popular belief, the commissioning legislation was not a TWOS recommendation but a separate Army proposal. Further clarification of the role of an Army Warrant Officer, including the commissioned aspect, is found in FM 22-100. http://www.penfed.org/usawoa/WOHERITAGE/Hi...WO.htm#websites


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Looking for original photos and other items from the First World War US 77th Infantry Division.

Also interested in BAR and M1917A1 BMG related items.

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I'm going to do some editing here. This commentary has already drawn moderator attention in a negative light. If I clip out your comment, take it for what it is. Any issues may be addressed to me via PM with ADMIN and Forum Support CC'd. Lively discussion is always welcome, contests of egos, wills, what have you are not.


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Actively seeking WW1 4th and 5th Brigade USMC helmets and also a named WW2 Raider green blouse.
I'd rather be a sparrow than a snail, if I could I surely would....

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