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American Imperial Wars Philippines, Haiti, Cuba, Domincan Rep


ludwigh1980
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Next up is the Uniform Coat of the 1902 variety of a Cavalry officer. To show what these looked in full dress, with matching cap, cavalry dress cape. Cords and belt. The Coat belonged to William Vaulx Carter, the cape to a Lt. William S. Barriger (U.S. Army) Dated 1901 and was made by the firm of B. Pasquale & Sons of San Francisco.

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General William Vaulx Carter ( This coat was worn from his commissioning to promotion to Captain) was born in Ft. Lowell Arizona. Commissioned in 1904 from Westpoint. Served in the Philippines in the famous 7th Cavalry. I will provide more on his history as I am still building his file.

 

William S. Barriger's cape is also currently undergoing research. He was in Cuba in 1900 as well as the Philippines in 1902. Went back to Cuba in 1908. Interesting enough he was stationed in Arizona at Fort Apache. Awesome to have something that was worn around that famous fort. Served along the Mexican Border. I am just getting started on his file so there is lot of work to do, of which I will post more later. Thanks for looking!

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Some really great goodies! I for one, certainly appreciate the show. I love this expansionist (Imperial) period of US history.

 

I would suspect that your sword is a war souvenir that was adopted for wear by the US Officer. The hilt is close enough to the regulation Model 1902 Army Officer Saber that he could carry it and the scabbard appears to be a standard US example for this US Army Officer sword. It was certainly fashonable during this time to remount captured/surrendered enemy blades on to German, Japanese, or US swords for wear by the confllict winners.

 

A very neat item!

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US Victory Museum

As usual, Terry, you've knocked this one out of the ballpark.

 

Please tell me that you have a set of trousers that accompany that cavalry dress uniform (even if they aren't his) to complete it.

Since you collect this era too, you know how uncommon it is to acquire dress capes, never mind an officer's cavalry cape. To see your

display and in the condition that it is in draws one's breath away. It is truely Ne Plus Ultra!

 

Kudos for recognizing the sword and the significance of its engraving.

 

I eagerly look forward to seeing more from your collection.

 

Msn

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Thanks Sarge and US Victory Museum again!. Sadly no trousers. I am still looking for the mounted riding breaches style. Sooner or later some will turn up. The cape is missing the rest of its closure knot, displays great anyway. Lt. Berriger served in some pretty grim action against the Moro's during the Jolo battles. Seems to have left the Army around 1913. Can't find out what happened for sure. Got in some legal situation as a civilian and then joined the Army again in WW1. Wish I could find more on him.

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Thought I would return to my first item posted the Forum: The coat of Marine Corporal George Frazee, Colorado Native killed in action in the Dominican Republic in 1916.

It is really this uniform that got me heavily involved into this period of military history. I was able to pull what the Archives had on him, not too much more to add than what I first posted. Served in the Army in the Philippines as an infantryman and latery signalman. After being discharged he worked in California as a miner. Must have gotten bored with that and decided to join the Marines in 1914. Sadly he was killed in the battle of Guayacanas after recieving a gunshot wound to the head. The link: pretty much covers his service: http://www.usmilitar...age__hl__frazee

 

Here are some more photo's of his uniform...

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George Frazee's Coat is a typical Pattern 1912 dress coat. Collar never pierced for devices. Large chevrons and service stripes. Only a slight discoloration of the sleeve hint at depot markings. Getting a bit wrinkled in the box, need to get a display form for it. Thanks for looking!

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  • 2 months later...
ludwigh1980

Been neglecting this thread for a while. The following posts entail a large photo album and soldiers hand book of a Private in Company D 4th United States Infantry who served in the Philippines from 1899 to 1901. The regiment saw heavy action against hostiles.

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ludwigh1980

Had to remove it from the original album. It was made of poor quality high pulp paper and was doing a number on the photographs with its high acid content.

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