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Can't seem to get theEDIT button to work but just wanted to add more info found on the web.

 

Introduced early 1944 only . This device consisted of a mounting plate, fastened to the left side of the wooden stock (by 2 screws) and featuring a 5-inch sight bar assembly which snapped on the mounting plate . The plate is calibrated in 5° intervals (from 0° to 45°) and is numbered in 10° intervals . There is an open sight and a level vial (bubble) for use in low-angle and high-angle fire . Horizontal and/or vertical adjustments can be made to zero the weapon . The M15 Sight could be used for all Rifles, including M1903, M1 models as well as the M1 Carbine . Issue only took place late war, and consequently very few probably saw field use . The complete Sight comes packed in an olive drab web pocket that closes with 2 press studs, is provided with the std. belt hook attachment, and includes an instruction sheet .

 

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I have seen a few photos over the years of these sights in use, both in training and what appeared to be combat. I can't recall where so posting a photo isn't possible.

 

These sights must have been made in the high 6 figure or low 7 figure quantities. They were dumped on the surplus market in the 60's or 70's and they were everywhere. IIRC they originally were sold at or around $5.00 but there was so many available with so few takers that the price dropped to $1.00. In the last few years I have seen several of the pouches without sights for sale at antique stores. It is kind of funny that now the pouch alone will sell to new collectors because they know it is US GI but don't know what it is for.

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PLEASE NOTE: THIS COMMUNITY MEMBER, SADLY, HAS PASSED AWAY

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These sights must have been made in the high 6 figure or low 7 figure quantities. They were dumped on the surplus market in the 60's or 70's and they were everywhere. IIRC they originally were sold at or around $5.00 but there was so many available with so few takers that the price dropped to $1.00.

 

Craig,

 

I used to see them for $5.00 as recently as a couple years ago, I think the prices are starting to go up however.

 

1917enfield, the edit function is only available for 30 minutes after your post is made, that is likely the reason you could not get it to work.

"It is a capital mistake to theorize before one has data. Insensibly one begins to twist facts to suit theories, instead of theories to suit facts."

*Sherlock Holmes in "A Scandal in Bohemia"*

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While there are a few photos, I think even posted on this site, of their use during combat, I believe most soldiers thought they were a waste of time. Unless you were the designated grenadier why would you waste time adding a device to the side of your weapon that was going to catch on everything. And if you shot enough grenades, I'm sure it was easier to just apply a little experience and kentucky windage and let'er rip. From watching old videos, etc,., I don't believe precision accuracy was much of a concern.

 

A couple of years ago you could find all the different makers rather easily. However, now that I have started looking for a BPS/Boehm maker I cannot seem to find one. I think $10 is right on.

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I looked for years for photos or evidence of their issue with no luck. I have a whole file on field expedient sights made up by the men in the field, but the ONLY photo anyone I know came up with was one in which it "appears" to show the circular plate mounted on a rifle - but its not very clear.

 

If someone has actually found photos I would very much like to know where.

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Here is a picture of the M15 mounted to the side of my M1 Garand. Note the somewhat scarce drilling jig for mounting the sight and the instructions to go with it.

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"No bastard ever won a war by dying for his country. He won it by making the other poor, dumb, bastard die for his country" George Pattons speech to the Third Army.

 

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I think there was one drilling rig per case of them. They used to be so common that I nice turned down an entire case for cheap money as I just did not want to take up the room

 

Still, no photo of the device actually used Ina combat zone.

 

 

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  • 10 months later...

Is it possible to mount the sight without the drilling jig? I want to install the sight on my garand for show and tell purposes but don't know if a drilling jig is required.

Does somebody have a picture of the disc on the garand for reference. I mean without the sight in place.

 

With kind regards,

 

Kim

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I know that there is not much photographic evidence of an m15 sight installed, but i find it difficult to believe that it was hardly used. According to FM 7-10 there were 2 grenadiers per squad. Other sources even mention 3 grenadiers per squad. I know it will reduce the value of my rifle but I have no intention to sell the weapon anyway. I would only install the sight for teaching purposes during re-enactment events for the audience. Otherwise the weapon stays in the collection.

 

with kind regards,

 

Kim

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It is not a question of how many people would have used them. They were devised rather late in the war and simply did not make it over to the combat zones in numbers large enough to be considered to be in common usage by the troops.

 

By the way, if you see a pouch for one of these with a U.S.M.C. stamped on it, don't be fooled. Those are fake markings intended to deceive the inexperienced collectors.

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I posted up a similar forum post a week or so ago..clearly showing one in use in Germany late 45....search the firearms section for the posting.

 

regards

 

Lloyd

What do you need another one of those for.....you have 6 of them already ?.........

:blink:

 

my girlfriend to me on a regular basis as another piece of US WW2 "Green stuff" aka militaria arrives in the post..:-)

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I know that there is not much photographic evidence of an m15 sight installed, but i find it difficult to believe that it was hardly used. According to FM 7-10 there were 2 grenadiers per squad. Other sources even mention 3 grenadiers per squad. I know it will reduce the value of my rifle but I have no intention to sell the weapon anyway. I would only install the sight for teaching purposes during re-enactment events for the audience. Otherwise the weapon stays in the collection.

 

with kind regards,

 

Kim

 

Several reasons this probably wasn't used other than being introduced late in the war. First and probably foremost, mounting on the left side of the weapon would mean that when the weapon was slung over the right shoulder, this thing would be poking you in the small of the back or catching on the pistol belt, canteen, jacket, coat, and about everything else. The eyelets on most cartridge belts were taken up with canteens, first aid kits, and every other asundry of combat gear necessary, who wants to take up another mounting point for a grenade sight.

Secondly, the means for firing the grenades was not a very well contained system that afforded much accuracy. You had to unload the live round chambered, put a blank cartridge in, fire, and then reload, not a very effective combat system. The propulsion came from the gas of the blank and any leaks to the system would cause a velocity shift, which would make the targeting an inacurate affair. If the grenade wasn't seated the same way or same depth, that would cause a velocity shift. Also, to use the sight, the rifle would have to be shouldered and fired that way, as opposed to putting the butt on the ground and using the MK I eyeball, which I have heard was the preferred method.

I have seen rifle stocks with holes from the grenade mount that the holes were wide and reamed out, indicating that they had been yanked out of the rifle. Just a poor design.


Visit my eBay store: http://stores.ebay.com/crustyw4scorner/

 

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