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Do you think your collection will hold its' value?


cutiger83

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The only problem with the movie theory is that it's not always accurate. I remember the "rush" on Marine uniforms prior to the release of FOOF. After the movie, the prices went..............nowhere. There have been a couple other movies that haven't raised the value of their genre of uniforms. The effect of BoB on 101st and 506th PIR in particular comes from my mantra of "buy the best quality possible". Even when this stuff was "cheap", the guys who bought the "high end" items - Rangers, Airborne, etc., have only seen their collections appreciate on a rapid scale.

 

Dave

 

If we are to accept that prices go up when a feature is released, then we must also accept that it will only hold that price if the feature is favorable to audiences.

"It is a capital mistake to theorize before one has data. Insensibly one begins to twist facts to suit theories, instead of theories to suit facts."

*Sherlock Holmes in "A Scandal in Bohemia"*

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this is the main reason I will never pay top dollar for a collectable, because I know I cant keep it forever and it wont be easy reselling it

 

those guys that pay several 1000's for a helmet are nuts, the helmet may not hold it's value in 20 years or more

 

I dont like to gamble or take chances with high dollar collectables

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there are some hobbies for instance that young people can't even start such as 30's-50's tin toys who's collector base is 50+ and the toys start in the hundreds, there is no young base to take over. I don't believe Militaria has that problem, especially with the many young under 18 collectors on this site that join on a weekly basis.

 

I'm 22 and collect lots of tinplate from the 20s-40s! It's not so bad, actually. Like with any field of collecting there are outrageous things and affordable things. Believe it or not, the rare, small time makers and unusual models are typically worth less than really high profile brands, which gives great opportunities to patient collectors like me (I prefer the unusual!).

 

It is like anything else though, the good high quality pieces will always demand a premium, while the common stuff may fluctuate wildly in price. That is the bottom line.

-Todd

Currently looking for WWI items, specifically photos of the 116th infantry regiment, and any material related to the USS Olympia.

Always on the lookout for any rations, miscellaneous personal items, pack filler, care package stuffers, knit Red Cross material, and oddball equipment to supplement the Doughboy display.
Have some extras? I help friends fill out their living history kit, and could always use more loaner gear!

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None of us has a crystal ball. How often have we read on the forum (for example) "I remember when mint WW2 liners were piled high and just a dollar a piece at the local surplus store when I was a kid back in the 60s"....or words to that effect. Hindsight is an exact science. We can't predict how much currently "cheap" items will be worth years into the future. DCUs and ACUs might be worth a fortune in 2037....who knows? So, will today's 20 year old collectors look back wistfully and say, "Man, I remember when you could buy DCUs for just $20!"

"We shall defend our island, whatever the cost may be. We shall fight on the beaches, we shall fight on the landing grounds, we shall fight in the fields and in the streets, we shall fight in the hills; we shall never surrender!"

 

Winston Churchill

" Life is what happens to you when you're busy making other plans."

John Winston Lennon

 

 

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Maybe 25 years down the line they'll make a movie about the war in Afghanistan and everyone will be falling over themselves to find Multicam and ACU gear!? Young collectors, take note!

There's a few who are doing just that, for sure.

 

Some of the Gulf and GWOT stuff I'm seeing being collected right now with great intelligence and care is truly going to be amazing, and top top top dollar if sold long enough from today.

HONORING FAMILY LtCol Wm Russell (1679-1757) VA Mil; Pvt Zachariah McKay (1714-97) Frederick VA Mil; BrigGen Evan Shelby, Jr (1719-94) VA Mil; Pvt Vincent Hobbs (1722-1808) Wythe VA Mil; Pvt Hugh Alexander (1724-77); Lt John R. Litton (1726-1804); Bvt BrigGen/Col Wm W. Russell (1735-93) 5th VA Rgmt; Lt James Scott (1736-1817); Capt John Murray, Sr (1747-1833); Capt John Sehorn, Sr (1748-1831) VA Mil; Pvt Corbin Lane (1750-1816) Franklin/TN Mil; Cpl Jesse D. Reynolds (1750-1836) 5th VA Rgmt; Capt. Solomon C. Litton (1751-1844); 1Lt Christopher Casey (1754-1840) SC Mil; Pvt Mark Adams (1755-1828); Pvt Randolph White (1755-1831) Bailey's Co. VA Rgmt; Capt. John R. Russell (1758-1838); Pvt Joseph T. Cooley (1767-1826) Fort Hempstead Mil; Pvt Thomas Barron (1776-1863) 1812; Capt. John Baumgardner (1787-1853) VA Mil; Pvt Joel Estep (1828-1864) Co B 5th KY Inf CSA & US; Pvt George B. Bell (1833-1910) Co C 47th IL Inf US; Cpl Daniel H. Barron (1838-1910) Co B 19th TN Rgmt Inf CSA; Capt Richard K. Kaufman (1908-1946) 7th PRG/3rd AF CCU; T-5 Vernon L. Bell (1926-95) 1802nd Spec Rgmt; PO2 Murray J. Heichman (1932-2019) HQSB/MCRD; PFC Jess Long (1934-2017) US Army; PFC Donald W. Johnson (1931-) 43rd ID HQ; A1C Keith W. Bell (1931-2011) 314th TCW; A3C Michael S. Bell (1946-) 3346th CMS; A1C Sam W. Lee (1954-2017) 2d BW; AW3 Keith J. Price (1975-) VP-10; 1Lt Matthew Wm Bell (1985-) 82nd Abn/SOC








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I'm 22 and collect lots of tinplate from the 20s-40s! It's not so bad, actually. Like with any field of collecting there are outrageous things and affordable things. Believe it or not, the rare, small time makers and unusual models are typically worth less than really high profile brands, which gives great opportunities to patient collectors like me (I prefer the unusual!).

 

It is like anything else though, the good high quality pieces will always demand a premium, while the common stuff may fluctuate wildly in price. That is the bottom line.

 

Yes, but if you compare yourself to all your other toy collector friends, I can guess you are the exception and not the rule for tin. I write for a vintage toy site, I only know one person who seriously collects tin who is around my age, first he has the money to do it but he competes with some older folks who have some serious cash. Here is a screen shot of one of his recent wins. I love tin, but I simply don't have that kind of cash to spend and most young people don't have the kind of cash to collect vintage (not reissue or replica) tins. I believe the basic items of a WWII US Army uniform is quite inexpensive for a young person to collect and obtain whereas a nice average desirable tin is hundreds of dollars.

 

Very cool I'd love to see more of your collection! It's great that you are in it like you are!

 

Leonardo

post-20589-1348013120.jpg

I collect items from The Battle of Iwo Jima (1945).

Top Iwo Jima Items I'm Looking For:

1) IDed 5th MarDiv Corpsman Jumper or Forest Green Coat.

2) IDed Coast Guard Navy Jumper

3) IDed CB's Sea Bee's Navy Jumper

4) IDed 147th Infantry Regiment Army Service Coat

5) IDed 32nd ID Army Service Coat (Occupation Kyushu with 5th MarDiv).

I am always looking for named and dated WWII USMC Forest Green wool alpha jackets/coats from the 5th Marine Division or other units who participated in the battle.

My Blog "Marines In Forest Green" http://marinesinfore...n.blogspot.com/

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I believe the ww2 collectibles that are named or have provenance in documents that bear witness to serial number on the item releasing them from the battle field will hold there value and increase in value.

Interested in military buttons and insignia

 

Always remember our Girls and Boys in Uniform - Past and Present..

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If we are talking American W.W. 2 items I feel the price will only rise. We are so close in time to this world, history, changing event it is hard to see the impact it will have on the collecting future. People my age ,52. grew up around these men and women. Everyons father, uncle or next door neighbor was in "The War". Surpluse items were every place and common. There are so many movies and documentaries, so many books, there is always some thing new to learn about this massive war. As more time passes younger collectors will want to just own a piece of this world changing event.

 

I collect for my love of history of this time period. To own a small part of this struggle of good vs. evil and honor the men and women who sacrificed and endured for this future that we live in. If I loose money so be it. I will never loose my enjoyment for the things in my keeping.

Steve

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Always looking for anything related to the 8th AAF and flight gear of W.W.2.

Also any info on Advisory Team 98 the unit my late father served in.

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I really don't care about the value honestly as I bought these items out of interest. If the prices goes down, awesome!!! That means more mint stuff for me! If the price goes up however, then I'll just have to buy smartly and only a few times a year. Either way, I still will enjoy whatever I find.

 

For those of you who have collected simply for investment reasons, well maybe your heart isn't totally in it. Just like anything that rises up and down in value, you have to use caution. I don't feel too sorry for you if the prices fall honestly. It just means that the hobby will live on and more younger collectors will arrive (Which is good!). We as collectors have done what even the government does with prices. We have created a fake bubble and eventually it will pop. Prices were inflated for some reason unknown to me. Anyway...

 

I have noticed a drop in what things are worth. I bought a rear seam helmet with O.D. 7 chinstraps (hard to find and unissued to boot!) back in 2010 for $300 or so. Just a week ago I couldnt get it moved for even $250 or so. That is drastic.

 

I've even scored alot of good deals at a militaria show of all places. Usually their prices are skyhigh! This time, not so bad. What I am worried about however is that collectors who are just out to make a buck will continue to try and raise prices. This will eventually lead to what the Third Reich collectors are experiencing. $1500+ for a good condition double decal helmet? Forget it! That side of the hobby will surely collapse sooner than ours due to the lack of interest in younger collectors on a budget due to prices.

 

Just my thoughts.

 

Sam

Actively collecting anything from the C Company, 1st Battalion, 141st Infantry Regiment, 36th Infantry Division.

 

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Alternatively, as long as you have disposable collectors you will have a militaria income! ;)

SURE.........why not!! Easy come, easy go. Collectors, or Income......now they have it, and now they don't. :lol:

**PLEASE NOTE: THIS COMMUNITY MEMBER HAS SADLY PASSED AWAY**

http://www.usmilitariaforum.com/forums/index.php?/topic/301020-robin-ray/

 

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I think the value of any collection is linked to the current state of the economy........

...........One thing's for sure the only time you are ever going to make any serious money is when you decide to sell off and quit collecting for good.

Rich

Rich, I disagree.

Even when the economy is not good, we have seen large sums of money being paid for top-notch militaria. The good quality and rare items always hold their value.

 

Also, when your ready to sell, you may not find that your collection will fly off the "for sale" forum. It takes awhile, and the prices will be soft except for the items mentioned above.

**PLEASE NOTE: THIS COMMUNITY MEMBER HAS SADLY PASSED AWAY**

http://www.usmilitariaforum.com/forums/index.php?/topic/301020-robin-ray/

 

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Yes, but if you compare yourself to all your other toy collector friends, I can guess you are the exception and not the rule for tin. I write for a vintage toy site, I only know one person who seriously collects tin who is around my age, first he has the money to do it but he competes with some older folks who have some serious cash. Here is a screen shot of one of his recent wins. I love tin, but I simply don't have that kind of cash to spend and most young people don't have the kind of cash to collect vintage (not reissue or replica) tins. I believe the basic items of a WWII US Army uniform is quite inexpensive for a young person to collect and obtain whereas a nice average desirable tin is hundreds of dollars.

 

Very cool I'd love to see more of your collection! It's great that you are in it like you are!

 

Leonardo

 

Yeah, it's amusing actually. People look at me funny because I'm usually telling the older folks all the information, and not the other way around! I may not know many things, but what I do know I know very well. It doesn't help that I still look like a teenager. My secret is that I'm very specialized; I only collect military toys like tanks and trucks, cannons, etc. Even more specialized in that I only buy pre-WWII toys (which helps make things less complicated). That gives me a really good shot at things that come up for a reasonable price. Speaking of which, if you think that robot is bad, check out this recent highlight from the king of antique toys, Märklin.

 

Auction date: May 12th, 2012

Holy_sheet_marklin_zps751bd56a.jpg

 

Remind me to send you a PM, I have a few items posted here and there, but I can give you a more precise catalog if you are interested.

 

This will eventually lead to what the Third Reich collectors are experiencing. $1500+ for a good condition double decal helmet? Forget it! That side of the hobby will surely collapse sooner than ours due to the lack of interest in younger collectors on a budget due to prices.

 

There have been numerous threads about that very topic recently over at WAF. Young guys like me are looking forward to more affordable German stuff, Imperial is "high" but fairly reasonable in comparison to stuff that is less old and by far less rare. The way people are "investing" in the high end stuff is making people question whether that pop will ever come. What people are seeing now in TR is about same as just about everything else (except gold), a slow, bitter bleeding of value. I could much more easily get into dealing in used cars than buying even mid-level TR items. :fear:

-Todd

Currently looking for WWI items, specifically photos of the 116th infantry regiment, and any material related to the USS Olympia.

Always on the lookout for any rations, miscellaneous personal items, pack filler, care package stuffers, knit Red Cross material, and oddball equipment to supplement the Doughboy display.
Have some extras? I help friends fill out their living history kit, and could always use more loaner gear!

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............ He died suddenly a couple of years ago at the age of 46. Sadly, the collection is now at the centre of a bitter financial legal wrangle. That's the down side of having a collection that's worth serious money!

Well, at least I know you weren't talking about me!! :laughing1:

**PLEASE NOTE: THIS COMMUNITY MEMBER HAS SADLY PASSED AWAY**

http://www.usmilitariaforum.com/forums/index.php?/topic/301020-robin-ray/

 

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Value is not always monetary, and history of brave men seldom diminished; and their actions/bravery never lose value.

This goes to my first post. If we have no one left who remembers these brave people, and what they sacrificed for, what value will be placed on any of our items??

**PLEASE NOTE: THIS COMMUNITY MEMBER HAS SADLY PASSED AWAY**

http://www.usmilitariaforum.com/forums/index.php?/topic/301020-robin-ray/

 

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normaninvasion

My question is: when did militaria collecting stop being a hobby? I realize that there is money at stake but in the grand scheme of things our collecting community is rather small and the majority of the worlds population could care less, let alone plunk down hard earned money on "war stuff". When I think of investment real estate, stocks/bonds, art, and buisnesses pop into my head, not so much helmets and uniforms. I have my investment tied up into a house that I built and have to hold on to untill there is something of a recovery, the value of my militaria collection is a drop in the bucket.

My collection is a hobby if I make a profit on an item I sell, thats icing on the cake. Most of the time I break even or have to be happy that someone is willing to buy my "stuff" and find value in things i enjoy. Not saying that I would be happy if the helmet I bought for $1500 is only worth $100, but I realize that if I get $1000 for it, maybe I placed too much value in it and the $500 was the cost of enjoyment. Juct my 2c Jeff

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Shows like "American Pickers" seem to have had an effect on the hobby. Guys now routinely cruise the antiques malls, flea markets, Goodwills and garage sales etc., trawling up all the militaria that's on offer. It's often bought quite cheaply...and is then offered for sale on the forum for considerably more! That's the free market in action I guess!?

"We shall defend our island, whatever the cost may be. We shall fight on the beaches, we shall fight on the landing grounds, we shall fight in the fields and in the streets, we shall fight in the hills; we shall never surrender!"

 

Winston Churchill

" Life is what happens to you when you're busy making other plans."

John Winston Lennon

 

 

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My question is: when did militaria collecting stop being a hobby? I realize that there is money at stake but in the grand scheme of things our collecting community is rather small and the majority of the worlds population could care less, let alone plunk down hard earned money on "war stuff". When I think of investment real estate, stocks/bonds, art, and buisnesses pop into my head, not so much helmets and uniforms. I have my investment tied up into a house that I built and have to hold on to untill there is something of a recovery, the value of my militaria collection is a drop in the bucket.

 

A hobby does not have to cost you money and nothing precludes it from making money for you.

 

To a certain extent your collection makes more sense as an investment than your house. You will always need a place to live so a house has certain limited liquidity: because even if you sell it you will still need another place to live and odds are good that new place will also have inflated value and eat up much of the profit you made from selling the old price (we've seen that time again here in California). But, your collection is not a necessity and if it goes up in value and you sell it you get to keep the money!

 

You mentioned "art" as a real investment. As someone who once in a while buys and sells some art, I can tell you that militaria is a whole lot better investment for we average folk.

 

I think the purpose of this thread is, in large part, to figure out if militaria collecting can be like Beanie Babies where somewhere down the line you end up with a bunch of stuff worth pennies on the dollar?

 

I've seen a couple of folks invoke Civil War collecting as an example of a dying marketplace. Based on my own experience in buying selling Civil War items the last few years, I don't see that. The stuff sells quickly and at very nice prices. Same with good German stuff. I sell a fair amount of that on another forum and nice, legitimate pieces always have multiple offers.

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Shows like "American Pickers" seem to have had an effect on the hobby. Guys now routinely cruise the antiques malls, flea markets, Goodwills and garage sales etc., trawling up all the militaria that's on offer. It's often bought quite cheaply...and is then offered for sale on the forum for considerably more! That's the free market in action I guess!?

 

In a few years after the novelty of shows such as these wear off, will the cost of items go back down? If we hold off on buying a few expensive "must haves", will we find them for a little less in a few years? Or will the collectors who can afford expensive items, buy them now then not want to resell in a few years because they can't recoup what they paid? So those of us on a limited budget will never be able to afford some nice items.

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My question is: when did militaria collecting stop being a hobby?

 

I don't think it has ever stopped being a hobby. I know when I buy a car, the value goes down as soon as I drive it off the lot. I know if I hold off buying the brand new electronic gadget, then I can get it for less in a few years when the novelty wears off. Some people just HAVE to have the latest and greatest in electronics so they pay top dollar. But a hobby is different.

 

My original question was never meant to place a value on items as an investment. Once the last of the WWII vets has passed on, will the people who pay top dollar for the "must haves" still be paying top dollar for these items? Will the price go down because the general public has lost interest in WWII vets? Some people have to see a WWII vet and hear their stories to be able to understand the value of their sacrifice. Before and after each episode of Band of Brothers, they were interviewing the vets portrayed in the movie. Seeing the men made it that much more special. All too soon, we won't be able to see and talk to them. Will that have an affect on collecting WWII items?

 

....Kat

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In a few years after the novelty of shows such as these wear off, will the cost of items go back down? If we hold off on buying a few expensive "must haves", will we find them for a little less in a few years? Or will the collectors who can afford expensive items, buy them now then not want to resell in a few years because they can't recoup what they paid? So those of us on a limited budget will never be able to afford some nice items.

 

I don't think the "picker" shows are driving up the cost of militaria. Blame eBay perhaps...but I don't see picker shows doing much to drive it up, as aside from one really cool show on the Discovery Channel ;) most of the "picker" guys don't do militaria.

 

Some of the expensive items in militaria today are fads, and may go back down over time. But it's impossible to forecast that accurately. Who knew that what used to be $15-$20 common WW2 helmets would sell for over $200-$300+??? They rose like the tech bubble on the stock market. Will they always be worth that? Who knows... I've seen bubbles burst before...I was collecting WW1 vintage photos from a "certain foreign nation" and I was buying them on eBay for anywhere from $1-$5 each, sometimes even less in batches. Within a year, I couldn't even touch boring ones for $5...and most were selling in the $20-$30 range! I gave it a few more months and then I figured it was time to sell. But by that time, the bubble had burst and they were selling again in the $1-$5 range.

 

Of course, that was on eBay and there were only a handful of collectors buying them, but the effect was still the same...the demand leaves and the price drops. Until that demand diminishes though, the prices will continue to rise over time.

 

Dave

Only a weak society needs government protection or intervention before it pursues its resolve to preserve the truth. Truth needs neither handcuffs nor a badge for its vindication. -Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy

Peace is not the absence of war, but the defense of hard-won freedom. -Anton LaGuardia

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Shows like "American Pickers" seem to have had an effect on the hobby. Guys now routinely cruise the antiques malls, flea markets, Goodwills and garage sales etc., trawling up all the militaria that's on offer. It's often bought quite cheaply...and is then offered for sale on the forum for considerably more! That's the free market in action I guess!?

 

 

Or a good business decision.

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In the early 80's I had a toy soldier collection and went to all of the shows.

 

Those Marklin boats were 5-6-7,000 back then.

 

I sold one of my Elastolin Half Tracks for 2500.00 now it's crazy money.

 

I agree if it is rare and in great condition :thumbsup:

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My collection consists mainly of standard patches. My value goes up when I show people units that they have never heard of. When I was deployed, my parents sent me a care package with all my recent purchases. As soon as I got back to my hootch with the package, a crowd would gather around as I opened and showed them my collection. They would ask which unit it was, and I would give them the run down. Some of the guys had been in other units, when I got patch they had worn, more value was added to my collection as they told me tidbits of there time with that unit. Eventually some of the guys were out trading patches or acquiring patches for me. So my value, regardless of prices is the connections I make through collecting. I collect for myself, the ranger scroll I bought last summer is worth more than I paid. If in 60 years it sells for five cents - I had the pleasure of keeping it alive for that long and just hope more collectors are out there to enjoy it. True value to me is remembering those who sacrificed there blood, sweat and tears so we can honor them generations after they are no longer around to tell there story.

 

Drew

"Remember Bataan, Never Forget"

Actively looking for U.S. Army Run/Swim/Walk For Your Life patches.

 

Treasurer, ASMIC

Area V VP, ASMIC

www.asmic.org


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Another thing to consider is that when there is a niche of collecting that goes up in value suddenly, i.e. helmets, medals, or certain units for example, it may be a handful of collectors affecting the whole market. If there are four or five collectors willing to buy a lot of a particular item, it may seem that the overall demand has risen....until they have their fix and the prices drop like rocks. That is why this hobby is so unique and interesting--one day an item you have might sell for $20 and weeks down the road you can't get them for anything less than $100!

 

Justin

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normaninvasion

My original question was never meant to place a value on items as an investment. Once the last of the WWII vets has passed on, will the people who pay top dollar for the "must haves" still be paying top dollar for these items? Will the price go down because the general public has lost interest in WWII vets? Some people have to see a WWII vet and hear their stories to be able to understand the value of their sacrifice. Before and after each episode of Band of Brothers, they were interviewing the vets portrayed in the movie. Seeing the men made it that much more special. All too soon, we won't be able to see and talk to them. Will that have an affect on collecting WWII items?

 

....Kat

 

Got it :thumbsup: I dont think there will be a lack of interest in WW2, once these vets pass on. I do wonder what will happen when the "boomers" retire from collecting, as that generation seems to be carrying the torch for there fathers and mothers. As well as being the most active in buying antiques and collectables :think:

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