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Navy Landing Parties


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MastersMate

WW 1 USCG Surfman involved in Port Security at NYC. If I recall, it was the mid 1970s when the CG discontinued using the Landing Party Manual.

 

 

WWI_Surfmen_Company.jpg

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MastersMate

Did some checking back in the regulations of the Revenue Cutter Service as far back as 1862. They required that the crews would regularly be drilled on the great guns according to the Navy ordnance manuals and drilled in small arms, cutlasses, infantry drill etc. according to the Marine Corps Manuals. They all state that when possible, the crew will be landed and these infantry drills will be conducted ashore.

 

Checked the Military requirements for CG enlisted personnel from the mid 1960s. A requirement Petty Officer 2nd was an understanding of the authority and relationship with civilian personnel when in a landing party involving civil disaster or unrest..

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MastersMate

WWI_LS_Crew.jpgFrom the CG historians web site

 

Backtracking from the 1921 CG register of officers, George Streeter was appointed Acting Keeper on 8 July 1918. After 6 mos probation he would be appointed as a permanent WO.

 

His uniform is the enlisted Surfmans khaki of the 1915 - 1920sh period. Just about make out the rating badge on his right arm and 4 hashmarks on his left . With a provisional appointment, he could retain the uniform of his previous rating until the appointment was made permanent. The Number 1 Surfman, along with other petty officers of the 1st class wore a CPO style uniform with the cap insignia similar to the USN CPO. Note that he has the CG Warrant Officer insignia, but the enlisted brown leather chin strap..

 

Having trouble posting the picture, will work on it..

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VolunteerArmoury

WWI_LS_Crew.jpgFrom the CG historians web site

 

..

Are they wearing M1903 cartridge belts belts back to front with buckle in the rear? I'm looking at it on a phone so maybe it's normal M1910 belts & I don't see the buckles on a small photo.

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  • 2 weeks later...
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Photo in question yes? At any rate, I can't answer your question as I don't know :lol: But I'm pretty certain other members might know. However while we wait I'll take a stab at it, perhaps this large round canteen is a special one for Pharmacist mates, he being today what we call a Corpsman a Medic?

 

post-8903-1283288408.jpg

. As I look at this close I am pretty sure this is just a canteen for water. The guy carrying it is also carrying a pistol but I see no other canteen in him ( unlike the others. The man in the center is a Radio Electrician and appears to be holding a cool of wire. Two rated men ( the CPO and the guy on the left) wear their rates on the right (can't make the rate out, but prior to 1918, QMs were last the Signalmen). This would make sense for a croup going ashore to set up a CommSta. The Sailor left center appears to be holding something round, but can not make it out.

 

Any way, thinking the canteen is simply a canteen for water.

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Two more Great War Navy Recruiting posters. Interesting, the depiction of Sailors outfitted for ground combat in this period seems to have been popular subject.

 

post-34986-0-37736400-1460177297.jpgpost-34986-0-19991700-1460177278.jpg

 

 

 

 

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  • 1 month later...

post-34986-0-54568100-1464578073.jpg

A WWII Coast Guard Landing Party, or if you like, Shore Party. They got Dogs with them, so you better take care, they mean business :D Don't know where foto was taken, Atlantic or Pacific Seaboard, or the Gulf of Mexico.

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USCG.jpg

A WWII Coast Guard Landing Party, or if you like, Shore Party. They got Dogs with them, so you better take care, they mean business :D Don't know where foto was taken, Atlantic or Pacific Seaboard, or the Gulf of Mexico.

I've always loved this photo. Notice that the BM2/c in the mingle of the boat has a beard!
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. As I look at this close I am pretty sure this is just a canteen for water. The guy carrying it is also carrying a pistol but I see no other canteen in him ( unlike the others. The man in the center is a Radio Electrician and appears to be holding a cool of wire. Two rated men ( the CPO and the guy on the left) wear their rates on the right (can't make the rate out, but prior to 1918, QMs were last the Signalmen). This would make sense for a croup going ashore to set up a CommSta. The Sailor left center appears to be holding something round, but can not make it out.

 

Any way, thinking the canteen is simply a canteen for water.

I think that is a fuel canteen. It is very similar to the Civil War fuel canteens that were used for signal lanterns.

 

Chris

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  • 4 months later...
Salvage Sailor

From my photo archive

 

USMC Captain instructing sailors armed with springfields and BAR's aboard USS ENTERPRISE (CV-6) WWII

 

USS ENTERPRISE (CV-6) Landing Party Instruction 001.jpg

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From my photo archive

 

USMC Captain instructing sailors armed with springfields and BAR's aboard USS ENTERPRISE (CV-6) WWII

 

He must be the Enterprise's Detachment Commander, these were Captains right?

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  • 2 months later...
Salvage Sailor

Another interesting photo of a sailor on land. This is Manila in December 1941. I can't make out what is written on his tin hat.

 

Just watched a new show put together for the 75th observance of the Pearl Harbor attack and this photo was identified as being taken in Honolulu shortly after the attack.

 

Needs more research..... Manila? Honolulu?

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  • 1 year later...

Seen mention early on in this topic about the Landing Party from the 1975 film the Wind & The Lion, so went looking and found this still, a nice one with the 1895 Colt Machine Gun.

 

post-34986-0-84255500-1538705954_thumb.jpg

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  • 8 months later...

Great photos of landing parties here and in other threads. It seems in the 1920s-1930s, in China for example, that wear of undress blues and undress whites, with web equipment and sometimes tin hat, was the most common uniform of the day. I've noticed in several period photos the wear of blues or whites without any apparent insignia -- no ratings badges on sleeves or branch tape at the shoulder, service stripes, etc. Was this common in China and other postings -- landing party or shipboard duty? I know trops were typically worn without insignia, except maybe pin-on collar badges for officers, but jumpers?

 

For example, check out the Coasties in Photo #135 above. The one jumping ashore over the stbd bow has no apparent insignia, and it appears unlikely this is a basic training exercise given the others that do show rating badges or branch tape.

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. As I look at this close I am pretty sure this is just a canteen for water. The guy carrying it is also carrying a pistol but I see no other canteen in him ( unlike the others. The man in the center is a Radio Electrician and appears to be holding a cool of wire. Two rated men ( the CPO and the guy on the left) wear their rates on the right (can't make the rate out, but prior to 1918, QMs were last the Signalmen). This would make sense for a croup going ashore to set up a CommSta. The Sailor left center appears to be holding something round, but can not make it out.

 

Any way, thinking the canteen is simply a canteen for water.

I am pretty sure this is a fuel canteen. Here are examples of Civil War signal Corp fuel canteens.

 

 

post-10825-0-66196400-1560955806_thumb.jpeg

 

post-10825-0-98669200-1560955815_thumb.jpegpost-10825-0-58004400-1560956074_thumb.jpeg

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vostoktrading

I think that is a fuel canteen. It is very similar to the Civil War fuel canteens that were used for signal lanterns.

 

Chris

 

Chris, You nailed it.

In this day & age we forget about mundane things such as lanterns needing fuel.

 

Jon.

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  • 2 months later...

Found this other still from The Sand Pebbles, the scene at the Consulate at Chansha to pick up those U.S. Missionaries, and after where the Party is made to leave at sling arms and under nationalist army escourt and is pelleted by food and junk when marching back to the ship :D

 

sandpebbles11.jpg?w=696

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  • 10 months later...

Hey I just remembered that the U.S. Coast Guard  undertook a few landings off cutters on Greenland to look for German weather stations, German Navy and or German Air Force personnel along with civilian (NSDAP) meteorologists ran these I think.

 

Here's one such Landing Party, Cutter unknown. they're armed with M1 Rifles, (A Site where you can't save images)

 

https://www.ww2online.org/image/us-coast-guard-combat-cutter-greenland-during-world-war-ii

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pararaftanr2
12 hours ago, patches said:

Hey I just remembered that the U.S. Coast Guard  undertook a few landings off cutters on Greenland to look for German weather stations, German Navy and or German Air Force personnel along with civilian (NSDAP) meteorologists ran these I think.

 

Here's one such Landing Party, Cutter unknown. they're armed with M1 Rifles, (A Site where you can't save images)

 

https://www.ww2online.org/image/us-coast-guard-combat-cutter-greenland-during-world-war-ii

Here you go. You can do a "screen capture", then edit accordingly.

 

500.Photograph. 'File No. 2978 Coast Guard hits rugged Greenland coast in hunt for Nazi weather station-- From a Coast Guard Combat Cutter, a landing party leaves its small boat to hit the rocky coast of western Greenland in a preliminary action which led to ultimate liquidation of German weather installations and ships operating in the icy fastnesses of the Far North. The Coast Guardsmen go in armed for battle and trained in commando tactics. In the foreground, left to right: Coast Guardsman Allen J. Elmergreen, seaman first class (with gun) of 1166 Robinwood Avenue, Lakewood, Ohio; Walter D. Harris, a yeoman second class, of Jackson, Miss.[Mississippi]; Ray Pritchard, seaman first class, of Isabella, Tenn.[Tennessee]; and George English, motor machinist's mate second class (back to camera) of 150 Oxford Avenue, Haverhill, Mass.[Massachusetts]' No date.

 

USCG.jpg

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