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John Ek Commando Knives (1941-1976)


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  • 4 weeks later...

Hello all.This is my first post on this forum(after my intro post).I was drawn to this forum by a reference to this post on another site while researching a knife I came into possession of.

I would first like to thank mr gunbarrel for his most informative history of the John Ek company.As a collector of some 60 years now,I can appreciate the time spent in researching any subject.

My first introduction to Ek knives was about 40 years ago when a co-worker of mine showed me his dad's knife that he had carried in WWII;an Ek Model 1.Don't recall if it had a serial #(I don't think it did)but the blade was in fair shape although I remember that the handle had loosened up(didn't think that could happen with those style rivets)and it still had it's original sheath;albeit a bit dry. I thought it looked a bit crude and was more interested in the Dogs Head KA-BAR folder he had.

I later read a bit about them in one of Bernard Levine's books.As I stated in my intro I was more into folding knives and although I had several military pieces they weren't a priority in my collecting.In fact I had a friend who was heavily into militaria and would buy collections;sort out the military stuff and then call me to see if I was interested in any of the rest. I in turn would let him know if I picked up anything that he might be interested in.

My interest nowadays has been toward unusual knives;whether they be inexpensive or not.It never fails to amaze me how inventive people can be when it comes to disguising a knife.But I digress.......

This past weekend I received a call from a gentleman with whom I had spoken several months ago at his yard sale.He told me he had a bunch of knives he wanted to sell and wasn't aware of what they were worth and would I be interested in them.I replied that I would take a look at them but didn't know how many I could buy as I had experienced some unexpected bills this past month.

Anywy to make a long story short I spent about 4 hours at his place evaluating some of his accumulation and pricing them for him to sell.In the course of doing this he told me to pick out any I might be interested in and we could come to a price on them.When I was finished doing them I presented him with ten knives I wanted but didn't know if I could afford them. Imagine my surprise when he presented me with all of them and thanked me for helping him out! I reminded him that these knives were pretty valuable but he insisted I take them. This one is the only military piece I got and I herewith present it for your viewing and comment.

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  • 7 months later...

Anybody see this at a recent auction. I was bidding on it but Proxibid locked me out at critical moment. First time I have seen throwing knives for sale (other than the one I have)

 

 

 

Lot of Five (5) Early John Ek Throwing Knives, included are knives of three different shapes, measuring from 7-7/8'' to 9'' overall; four of the five knives are marked ''John Ek'', on two the remnants of ''Hamden Conn.'' is partially legible. The fifth knife is unmarked but appears to be original. Two of the knives are drilled for a wrist thong. Included is a blue nylon cordura carrying case. Conditions range from good to fine overall. Knives show light to moderate signs of age and use, maker's marks are partially legible, some with overall light carbon spotting; the unmarked knife with moderate pitting. A nice collection of seldom seen knives. Est.: $400-$600/lot.

 

 

https://www.proxibid.com/asp/LotDetail.asp?ahid=4840&aid=91864&lid=23499343&rfpb=0#Top

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Newbie here,

 

I've attached two pictures of my grandfather's WWII fighting knife. Some much appreciated help from the folks over at bladeforums.com, and Frank Trzaska from usmilitaryknives.com has led to the conclusion that this began life as an Ek (which model is still up for debate), and was modified in theatre. The serial number suggests it was one of the earlier WWII knives, but there is no John Ek markings on the blade itself. Any help/insights/suggestions/guesses regarding this knife would be appreciated and encouraged. My grandfather lived in New York state and was stationed in Alaska during the war. Blade length is about 7", handle is about 4". Knife is currently across the country so that is the best I can do for now.

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Anybody see this at a recent auction. I was bidding on it but Proxibid locked me out at critical moment. First time I have seen throwing knives for sale (other than the one I have)

 

 

 

Lot of Five (5) Early John Ek Throwing Knives, included are knives of three different shapes, measuring from 7-7/8'' to 9'' overall; four of the five knives are marked ''John Ek'', on two the remnants of ''Hamden Conn.'' is partially legible. The fifth knife is unmarked but appears to be original. Two of the knives are drilled for a wrist thong. Included is a blue nylon cordura carrying case. Conditions range from good to fine overall. Knives show light to moderate signs of age and use, maker's marks are partially legible, some with overall light carbon spotting; the unmarked knife with moderate pitting. A nice collection of seldom seen knives. Est.: $400-$600/lot.

 

 

https://www.proxibid.com/asp/LotDetail.asp?ahid=4840&aid=91864&lid=23499343&rfpb=0#Top

 

 

Rather than lose these to posterity when removed from website:

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Newbie here,

 

I've attached two pictures of my grandfather's WWII fighting knife. Some much appreciated help from the folks over at bladeforums.com, and Frank Trzaska from usmilitaryknives.com has led to the conclusion that this began life as an Ek (which model is still up for debate), and was modified in theatre. The serial number suggests it was one of the earlier WWII knives, but there is no John Ek markings on the blade itself. Any help/insights/suggestions/guesses regarding this knife would be appreciated and encouraged. My grandfather lived in New York state and was stationed in Alaska during the war. Blade length is about 7", handle is about 4". Knife is currently across the country so that is the best I can do for now.

 

 

Further to contemplate as already posted at Bladeforums

According to the numbering system described in the U.S. Militaria forum thread your knife may actually be the 'Marine WWII model 9 modified to the WWII Model 5 profile? The extended swedged (?) top edge of the Marine model does differ though, unless it was also reformed.

Also, unless your tang has 3 holes in it for the lead plug rivets it would have to be a replacement stick tang.

That is a lot of modification besides sourcing a cross guard from elsewhere too.

Is it plausable?

 

And significantly 9A898 - one of the first 1000 knives made during WWII?

 

Post #69 in theU.S. Militaria forum thread suggests the extended swedged version above is actually a 'Paratrooper' Model 8 which was WWII only production. So the Model number '9' in serial number 9A898 would mean it is not made from that model. Trying to find an image of a WWII 'Marine' Model 9 now.

 

 

The WWII Model 9 Marine was apparently the same as a WWII Model 5 Navy blade with a WWII Model 1 Commando Combat S/E handle.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hello All,

 

I thought to share this story about my first Ek Knife.

 

 

It was 6 years ago today, that I walked into the Badger Knife Show in Janesville, Wisconsin, and saw this knife for sale at the very first table inside the door. I didn't bring much money with me that year because I wasn't really looking for anything special. When I was told the asking price for the knife, it was pretty reasonable, but it was nearly "all" the money I had in my pocket. It would have left me with only $25. Not wanting to spend "all" my money within the first 10 seconds of the show, I passed it by. Also, I had never heard of - or seen, an Ek knife before this, and I thought this one was pretty darn ugly compared to traditional WWII fighting knives. I walked past the next 4 tables, less than 30 feet, when I realized my mistake and decided I better go back and get it, because it suddenly hit me - this was exactly the kind of WWII collector knife that people are looking to buy. Good condition, solid WWII history, documented provenance, etc.
I walked right back, and ........ it was "gone" - off the table - SOLD .... to someone who had been standing behind me waiting for me to put it down. I asked the seller if he could tell me who bought it. He did, he told me he sold it to Gary, a big WWII Military knife collector. He told me Gary paid him his asking price without question. I knew Gary, and he had lots, and lots, of WWII collector knives, and was well known for seeking out the very best ones. It was then that the seller told me that the original owner "Hugo Lutz" had passed away, and he was Hugo's brother Paul. He went on to say that he was the one that also carried the knife while he served in Korea in a MASH Unit. I could have cried.
I was sick to my stomach for over a year for having passed this one by. For years I searched every Internet auction listings trying to find one like it, with no results, not in over 5 years.
Every year at the show I saw Gary buying more and more WWII collector knives at the Badger knife show.
Well........... six years have now passed.
Yesterday, I drove the 2 hours to the knife show and saw Gary again. I asked if he was still buying WWII collector knives. He said NO, he was moving in a different direction. I mentioned the EK knife that I had missed buying 6 years ago, and how I regretted not buying it ever since. Gary said he remembered the knife, and yes, he still had it. I asked if he thought about maybe selling it. He said; "YES - I'll bring it in tomorrow if you want." (it would be another 2 hours to drive back tomorrow) I asked; "How much will you be wanting for it?" He said he didn't remember what he had paid back then. I told him that I remember "exactly" what he paid, because it had been haunting me for the last 6 years. I told him the amount, and he said; "Yes, that sounds right. You can have it for that if you want it." I told him YES I wanted it, and to bring it tomorrow and I'll drive back to buy it. I had a very sleepless night. I sure hoped he would remember to bring it.
I drove the 2 hours back to the show this morning, and there it was, just as I remembered it, with all the paperwork and pictures from six years earlier.
And here it is. And now its finally mine.
Very seldom do you get a "second chance" to correct a mistake in life. I consider myself very lucky.
It came with the following below.
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Buckstix,

 

What a great tale. Thank you, so much, for sharing it with us. You are one lucky fella.

 

And I find very interesting the fact that the Lutz brother referred to the handle as a "temporary" knife handle. Go figure!

GB

 

 

 

 

 

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  • 3 months later...
  • 4 months later...
  • 1 year later...

My addition to the topic

 

Here is the original post

http://www.usmilitariaforum.com/forums/index.php?/topic/299799-new-knifeits-not-all-on-ebay/

 

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In Memoriam:
Lieutenant J.Kostelec 1-3 First Special Service Force MIA/PD 4 March 1944 Italy
I HAVE SEEN THE ENEMY AND IT IS DAYLIGHT
Forget about the tips..We'll get hell to pay (AC/DC)
"If you cant get out and run with the big dogs then sit on the porch and bark at the cars going by.."

Have you Hugged a Clown Today?

You Cant Get A Sun Tan On The Moon..





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  • 3 weeks later...

Hello gents,

 

Here is mine..as far as I know.. First/only one I've seen with the fuller. Looks factory to me.

 

Years ago I started collecting the modern Ek's made in Richmond (only the Richmond ones). I'm friends with the owner of the company who was making the nylon sheaths for Ek at the time. Anyway, I took an interest in them when I saw some of his. I live in Va. so I took an interest in the ones made in Richmond.

 

I've been watching for older models but never came across one at a price I was willing to pay for it until this one.

 

It didn't have a sheath so I made one. I've been making replacement modern style sheaths for a few years but I made this one a little narrower.

 

Anyway, here it is and a few of the other sheaths I make.

 

Best,

Rob

 

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  • 1 month later...

Just picked this up this morning at a flea market. First Ek knife I have owned. Don't know much about them but thought I'd post it. Any info would be appreciated! Thanks, Jim

 

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Nice example

In Memoriam:
Lieutenant J.Kostelec 1-3 First Special Service Force MIA/PD 4 March 1944 Italy
I HAVE SEEN THE ENEMY AND IT IS DAYLIGHT
Forget about the tips..We'll get hell to pay (AC/DC)
"If you cant get out and run with the big dogs then sit on the porch and bark at the cars going by.."

Have you Hugged a Clown Today?

You Cant Get A Sun Tan On The Moon..





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  • 1 month later...

Hello,

I'm new here and this is my first post. Below are a few pics of my small John Ek collection. I have an early Hamden Model 1 with the original scabbard (serial number 1M66) without any company markings. I have included a letter written by John Ek in 1971 to a collector, written on a company invoice. I blacked out the name of the recipient because I wasn't sure if it was ok to include it here. Included in the photos are an early copy of "Your Silent Partner" and a later Richmond Va Ek with a retro Ek made leather scabbard.

 

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Great looking knives Glenn. Thank you for posting pictures.

 

I'm partial to the older models like yours, but I only have two of the older models myself. I took an interest in the Richmond Ek's a few years ago and I have acquired a few of those.

 

I recently made a sort of retro M6 style sheath with nylon webbing for the Ek/USM3 style knives because I needed a sheath for one of my older models.

 

Here is my meager collection. I like the used/beat up knives in particular. Seems like it's easier to find mint ones than used ones. I guess guys don't let them go as easily once they actually use them.

 

Best,

Rob

 

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