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John Ek Commando Knives (1941-1976)


gunbarrel
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Early Model No. 4 made in Hamden prior to serialization. No markings observed on the blade or anywhere else. This is one massive knife!

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Theater-modified “Marine” model No. 9. Mid-war production marked with company logo and 9F30. This beautiful knife is featured on p. 152 of Wright’s book on theater knives.

 

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Well, that's it for now, folks. I invite you to post pictures of your Ek Commando knives. Please, let me know if you see any mistakes, as I hope that this post can be used for future reference right here on our Forum.

 

Thank you for looking!

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Thanks, Will and Sactroop! Glad you liked it. :thumbsup:

 

JS, I'll send you a voucher for popcorn and a coke :lol: I plan to post some of my F/S collection on your subject post next. I promise, I won't get long-winded on your post! :D

 

Robin, what a deal on that Hamden Ek Commando knife! Thanks for sharing it with us. :thumbsup:

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General Apathy

The story begins in 1939 at the Whitney Machine Shop at 1242 Whitney Avenue in Hamden Connecticut in what is now a “cake design studio.” That is the year that John Ek, a machinist who had been in the boat business, developed a prototype of the knife that would make him legendary among American military men who appreciated a good fighting blade.

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Hi GB, nice knives, great photo's, good presentation on the history of Ek knives, enjoyed your topic. ;)

 

think I might even have one packed away somewhere :blink:

 

ken

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Charlie Flick

Hey GB:

 

Thanks for bringing together all of this info and the photos in one spot for the benefit of your fellow collectors. Great stuff!

 

Regards,

Charlie

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suwanneetrader

I can remember Mr. Ek Sr. setting up at some early 1970's Florida Gun Collector's shows. To show how "dumb" I was I never bought not even one as "I thought most looked too much like butcher knives and fish knives". I had just moved from St Aug. when his son started his shop there. I appreciated their roll during WWII, Korea and Vietnam but these knives are just another great Militaria item that has greatly increased in value that I messed-up on and did not buy and save them. Oh well, on about $150.00 a week and a family I couldn't keep very much. :lol: Richard

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GB,

Thank you for great post and information. When I was researching a few of the Ek's I had at one time, I located a fellow in Virginia (Richmond?) who had what was left of the return cards. Maybe associated with the old knife museum that was there.

 

Thanks again for the great post.. hopefully it will be pinned.

 

Regards,

Curt

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We need reference threads about these "boutique" knife makers. They did seriously fine work!!

Yes......please pin the thread!!! :thumbsup:

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  • 1 month later...

This is a great thread. Great information.

 

Does anyone know or can anyone hazard a guess as to when Models 6 & 7 were put into production? I have an original copy of the 2nd edition of "Your Silent Partner" printed in August 1944, and they are included as available models in that pamphlet. I know the Models 1 & 2 were produced first, but I cannot seem to find any information in any of my books regarding the production of the knives with guards.

 

Thanks,

John

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