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The US M191A4 LMG.

 

This particular gun is a Title II (Registered Live) weapon that I routinely shoot with real ammunition

for recreational purposes, or blank fire adapted for Living History events. The heavy weight of the

weapon, combined with the weight of the mount and the slow cyclical rate of fire makes this the

ideal weapon for introducing neophytes to the world of automatic weapons. With the T&E locked

down there is little chance of any potential accidents so I have no difficulty allowing curious children

at the range a few short bursts to give them a hands-on experience with WWII history. This isn't

something I'd do with my unmounted MG42 or MG34.

 

When I shoot the weapon, I'll either use modern cloth belts, or I'll insert a small aluminum shim

(made from a soda can) above the trunion and shoot metallic links. Although originally chambered

in .30-06 (7.62x63mm), many have been converted to .308 (7.62x51mm). I have both the

original parts, as well as the conversion parts, so I shoot whatever is cheaper or whatever I have.

 

To convert the weapon between calibers only four things are required.

1) Change the booster. 7.62x63mm = 0.500" Booster vs 7.62x51mm 0.750" booster.

2) Bolt There is a subtle difference in the T-slot tapper.

3) Cartridge spacer. Feeds the belt in the correct position

4) Top cover feed pawl. Grabs the belt lower since 7.62x51mm is shorter than 7.62x63mm

 

The bluish stuff within the booster in the second picture is fouled copper corrosion from particles

of brass stripped from the bullet jacket. The chamber of the booster will, over time, fill with

large chunks of carbon/copper deposits and needs to be scraped clean (for which the military

created a special tool.)

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M1918 Belting Machine.

 

This is a picture of the model 1918 cloth belt filling machine. Used in both wars, this

particular model was WWII (1942) production as the maker's information and date

were cast into the base of the frame.

 

A tension arm would insert needles into a cloth belt to open the cartridge pockets

while a crank actuated ram would push the rounds into the belt. The motion of the

crank would advance the belt to the next pocket and the process would be repeated.

Rounds would be inserted into the vertical clip and held by their rims in a T-Slot

and would be fed by gravity as the belt advanced.

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When not in use, the machine could be taken down and inserted into its carry box.

 

The little manilla envelope in the photo contains lots of spare needles as they

will eventually wear out and need to be replaced. Although it's safe to say that

I have put well over ten thousand rounds through this gun, most of them in cloth

belts, I have yet to replace the original needles this machine came with.

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A 1942 Dated 250 round belt. I prefer to use the 50 round belts, especially when I let other people

use my gun. That way if someone goes a little wild with their trigger finger I don't get pissed-off

when they start racking up serious money (especially with today's surplus ammo prices.)

 

LAST PHOTO

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USVM:

 

Thanks for the posts. Very informative, especially on the belt loading details.

 

I thought you guys might also enjoy seeing this period pic of a .30 M1919A4, in the form of a real photo postcard, which shows the gun and the cloth ammo belt to good effect.

 

Regards,

Charlie Flick

 

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Nice bit of kit the belting machine,good to see one complete in nice condition.Mine was found in a barn in the ardennes in rusty condition missing the loading tube & box....

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Daniel G Harries 517th PRCT Ardennes/Rhine Crossing

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Here's mine, a semiauto. This was taken a couple years ago while shooting with my sons. It has since been converted back to .30-06 and I've added a carry handle which makes it easier to lug around. I've also gone to using cloth belts instead of links. I have a friend that has a C&R Saginaw that is great fun!

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***Looking for Civil War and earlier muskets or parts guns that need repairs or restoration***

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Great item and also liked the loading info. I also liked that rocket launcher you have.

Your title name, US Victory Museum, does that mean an actual museum or are these your own private class three weapons?

 

If you have other class 3's or any other weapons or items? Just a thought if you do, you might want to start a thread in the DISPLAYS & PRESERVATION thread and show the collection as I'm sure folks here would love to see and learn about any items you post. Again two neat items, Ray

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Great item and also liked the loading info. I also liked that rocket launcher you have.

Your title name, US Victory Museum, does that mean an actual museum or are these your own private class three weapons?

 

If you have other class 3's or any other weapons or items? Just a thought if you do, you might want to start a thread in the DISPLAYS & PRESERVATION thread and show the collection as I'm sure folks here would love to see and learn about any items you post. Again two neat items, Ray

 

The answer to your first question is BOTH. The US Victory Museum is a privately owned museum organized by three collectors, of which I am one.

Everything I have displayed so far in both this section and the Women's section are my personal items. As an entity, the actual museum owns nothing.

The three collectors display their collections at the building which is owned by one of us. The museum is housed in the original city hall in the town of

Archer, Florida, which was built in the early 1890s. My primary area of collecting interest is machineguns and destructive devices, which I started

collecting in the 1980s (back when they were dirt cheap). Most are WWII German and Soviet and are therefore outside the bounds of this forum.

I have a small collection of WWI uniforms (~12), and perhaps 24 WWII field uniforms, and a ton of WWII era women's uniforms (see that forum).

In addition to those uniforms and weapons, I have a virtual mountain of accouterments and accessories which makes my house into a museum in

its own right. My fellow collectors are Richard DesChenes who shows a massive collection of WWI Balloon Corp uniforms, badges, wings, etc.

He's in the process of writing a book about it and the history. I've proof read his manuscript. The other is Armand Caudron; his family built early

biplanes. His collection is mostly WWII German and thus is also outside the bounds of this forum. He, BTW, owns the building where we display

our collections. The museum is open on patriotic holidays, special events days, and by appointment since all of us have regular jobs.

 

So far, all photographs are items owned by me and photographed in my own house. I'll let the others decide whether they want to post their own

items, or whether they'll grant permission for me to post photographs I have of their collections. If or when I do that, I'll explicitly state who owns

those items. Unless otherwise stated in the text, everything I post is my own.

 

P.S.

To the person who PM'd me:

No, the thumbnail isn't a photo of me; Yes, you are correct that is Harvey Lembeck aka Eric Von Zipper.

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The US M191A4 LMG.

 

This particular gun is a Title II (Registered Live) weapon that I routinely shoot with real ammunition

for recreational purposes, or blank fire adapted for Living History events. The heavy weight of the

weapon, combined with the weight of the mount and the slow cyclical rate of fire makes this the

ideal weapon for introducing neophytes to the world of automatic weapons. With the T&E locked

down there is little chance of any potential accidents so I have no difficulty allowing curious children

at the range a few short bursts to give them a hands-on experience with WWII history. This isn't

something I'd do with my unmounted MG42 or MG34.

 

When I shoot the weapon, I'll either use modern cloth belts, or I'll insert a small aluminum shim

(made from a soda can) above the trunion and shoot metallic links. Although originally chambered

in .30-06 (7.62x63mm), many have been converted to .308 (7.62x51mm). I have both the

original parts, as well as the conversion parts, so I shoot whatever is cheaper or whatever I have.

 

To convert the weapon between calibers only four things are required.

1) Change the booster. 7.62x63mm = 0.500" Booster vs 7.62x51mm 0.750" booster.

2) Bolt There is a subtle difference in the T-slot tapper.

3) Cartridge spacer. Feeds the belt in the correct position

4) Top cover feed pawl. Grabs the belt lower since 7.62x51mm is shorter than 7.62x63mm

 

The bluish stuff within the booster in the second picture is fouled copper corrosion from particles

of brass stripped from the bullet jacket. The chamber of the booster will, over time, fill with

large chunks of carbon/copper deposits and needs to be scraped clean (for which the military

created a special tool.)

 

This piece is absolutely amazing !!!!!!!!..........and yes, I'm drooling on my keyboard.

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Don't know if there is any pictorial evidence of this?,We were told by a [FSSF]vet that some of there 1919's were retro fitted

B A R Bipod legs to the barrel and a "butt" fitted to the pistol grip[pre 1919A6]..This was to reduce to "team" down allow more ammo to be carried..

Anyone else heard or know of this practice?..Would be nice to find a picture to back it up!!

 

Cheers,

 

Dave.

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**PLEASE NOTE: THIS COMMUNITY MEMBER HAS SADLY PASSED AWAY**

http://www.usmilitariaforum.com/forums/index.php?/topic/61663-forum-member-bilkos-dave-death-reported/

 

 

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  • 2 months later...
  • 1 month later...

I picked up an Isreali 1919A4 parts kit and had it built into a semi-auto in .308.

It uses the Izzy metal belt and is a hoot to shoot.

I added a spade grip just because it looks kinda cool. I gave some thought to adding the A6 kit, but I like the look the way it is now.

The whole thing was re-parkerized, and the right side plate was engraved to match a USGI WWII manufacturer.

All I need now is the right deal on a tripod. As it is, I'm using an MG34 tripod with a pintle I had made at work. (I work in the metal fabrication industry)

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