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T-19E2 with Liner Helmet M-1 Crash


Paul Reijnders
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Paul Reijnders

After looking and hunting for several years after the steelpot for the Liner Helmet M-1 Crash, I finaly "found" one on eBay !!

( The seller worked together with me and sold it with a Buy it Now ).

 

The "T" series of experimental tank helmets was tested in December 1944 at Fort Knox, Kentucky. The most serious flaw with the helmets was the exessive weight. It was also determined that the size of the helmets was too great for the small confines of U.S.tanks. They simply got in the way of the operators. The size of the helmet was a difficult issue to address. While the armored forces wanted full ballictic protection for the crews, they also wanted them to be able to use communications gear and operate sights. Consequently, the helmet had to be worn over and around the communications gear. This made for a rather large helmet shell to provide the protection the Armored Forces Board required. As with the majority of experimental helmet projects, the "T" series was scrapped. While the "T" series was being put through its paces at Fort Knox, simultaneously, the Ordnance branch, in cooperation with the Quartermaster Corps, tried to create a new style of crash helmet based on a modified version of the M-1 combat helmet. The first attempt was designated as the T19E1. The helmets was essentially an M-1 helmet with the front brim removed. This "steel shell surgery" was done to permit the crewmembers to use the tank's fire control instruments. Coupled with this was a new crash helmet liner developed by the Quartermaster Corps. The second generation of this experimental helmet was the T-19E2. Like its earlier counterpart, this helmet was also a modified M-1 helmet, however, the modification was more radical as earphone holes were removed from the shell. The liner for the T-19E2 was simply identified as a "Liner Helmet M-1 Crash.

 

Regards , Paul Reijnders

 

For more rare collectors treasures visit my website : http://www.ww2supply.com/index.html

( See under "Collectors treasures" ).

post-4905-1340522638.jpg

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  • 3 weeks later...

What a wonderful find!

 

How does this helmet compare to the M3 sans earflaps? It appears that the front brim has been removed but otherwise they seem similar.

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  • 2 years later...

And here's a period foto of the liner in use, see caption above foto, scanned by me from the September 1955 issue of The National Guardsman. The 1st Shirt is wearing a 1950s redesigned version of the 178th Infantry's original unit crest, that neither James Sawicki in his Infantry linage series, or TIOH made a note of.

 

post-34986-0-43735200-1431880518.jpgpost-34986-0-26573500-1431880880.jpg

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  • 2 weeks later...

Thanks Bugme-sgtdorngo, I would love to spot more, because seeing this one example of it being worn in the manner of the M1 liner makes me wonder how prevalent this might of been in the 50s.

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  • 7 years later...

Nearly Eight years later, finally found another Unit used T-19E2 Liner.

 

50s again, here a Corporal in the 3rd Armored Cavalry Regiment, in Germany probably.

tanker liner.jpg

tanker liner 2.jpg

tanker liner 3.jpg

tanker liner 4.jpg

tanker liner 5.jpg

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  • 4 months later...

Found one more, a little worse for time and wear. Decal for the patch of West Point Faculty and Regular Army Component, it's possible it was worn by a member of the Tank Company 1st Infantry Regiment  1956-58.

west pointf.PNGwestpointn.PNG.e8505b4b79c20c0564ae16974f3b6da5.PNG

 

west pointt.PNGwestpoint.PNG.24e0cc3af55600129382f2d8073ade6e.PNG

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