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US Victory Museum

This is a Title II (i.e. registered live) GE manufactured 2.36" M9A1 Rocket Launcher, colloquially called a Bazooka.

The US Military never called them Bazookas; they were known as Rocket Launchers. The bore size is the same

as that of a 60mm mortar M2; however, since the US mortar M2 was derived from a French WWI design it retained

the metric nomenclature, whereas the 2.36" M9A1 was purely an American invention, we used our inch pattern

nomenclature. This model is a late war variant that is designed to be broken down into two sections or ease of

mobility in dense foliage (Jungle campaign), or Airbourne drops.

 

In the enclosed photos you'll see a rocket sticking out the back of the launcher in the firing position. While in this

position, a spring loaded clamp engages the notches in the rocket fins. This is to prevent the rocket from sliding

out of the launcher if one is aiming down a steep hillside, or over the edge of a building (in urban combat).

 

Although innovative in its use of a shaped charge weapon design, the warhead was too small to be effective

against anything larger than a Panzer IV in a frontal assault. It could wreak havoc against the thin top armor

or rear armor of German Panthers and Tigers; however, when faced by a charging Panther or Tiger, the best

one could hope for would be to blow off the track and evade the coaxial mounted MG34 while beating a hasty

advance in the opposite direction.

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US Victory Museum

Magneto powered firing mechanism. Early Rocket launchers used battery boxes, which always lose

their charges at the most inopportune times. Click! $%^&&*!@$%

post-1529-1200935728.jpg

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US Victory Museum

Top View rear section. The two coils are the contact points for the electrical wires contained

within the rocket motor. When the rocket has been positioned, the two wires attached to the

rocket are bent backwards and affixed to the coils for firing.

post-1529-1200935918.jpg

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US Victory Museum

My backyard is clear. It's safe to come outside. BTW, this picture was taken today just before noon.

It was a balmy 61 F day. Every winter I come to love Florida more and more.

 

Oh yeah, this photo shows how the gun sight functions. The aim point is affixed to the glass of the

sight and is projected over the target.

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US Victory Museum

A historical photo (cropped to fit the board size requirement) African American Troops in Italy.

post-1529-1200936512.jpg

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  • 2 years later...

Sorry to resurrect an old thread but i figured it was better than starting a new one.

 

Does anyone have more reference photos of the M9 or M9A1 being used or any other wartime pictures?

 

I'm also looking for the Technical Manual for the M9A1 i believe its the same number as the M1A1 TM, TM 9-294 but searches only bring up the 1942 TM for the M1A1, does anyone have a digital copy of the M9A1 version or know where to get one?

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Johan Willaert

 

 

Top View rear section. The two coils are the contact points for the electrical wires contained
within the rocket motor. When the rocket has been positioned, the two wires attached to the
rocket are bent backwards and affixed to the coils for firing.



Actually only one of those spring contact points is used to fire the rocket. There is one on each side to choose from depending on the position of the loader.

The rocket engine has the negative wire soldered to one of the fins while the positive wire comes straight out of the engine... This wire is attached to one contact point.
The negative side of the circuit is made through the fin and the clamp that holds the rocket in its launching place.
The - is the bazooka tube, while the + runs through the wire to the metal band holding the spring contacts , hence the rubber insulation band round the tube under the spring contact points band...

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