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What are some things that reenactors can do to be more authentic?


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My first post.... You want to be realistic? Pretend to smoke! 99% of the soldiers had this habit in the 40s... I don't smoke but when someone takes a pic of me in my impression, i lite a cigarette with my repro zippo... Cheers, H. Chinaski

 

 

99% of soldiers still smoke today. Your the oddball if you dont. ;)

 

 

Dent

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99% of soldiers still smoke today. Your the oddball if you dont. ;)

Dent

 

*Hides my oddball hat*

 

Having just retired from active duty, I will admit, while a lot of soldiers DO smoke, or dip, they are in a shrinking majority. With the push for healthier soldiers, smoking is actually frowned upon these days. I was in for 28 years, and never smoked. My last few years on active duty saw many people actually quitting, or at least trading the smokes for the spits...

 

Wayne

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HolyHappiness

Don't waltz around the battlefield. If you're under fire you don't have an I don't care attitude, pretend you're being shot at.

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My first post.... You want to be realistic? Pretend to smoke! 99% of the soldiers had this habit in the 40s... I don't smoke but when someone takes a pic of me in my impression, i lite a cigarette with my repro zippo... Cheers, H. Chinaski

 

Please don't misinterpret my following comments; I have nothing against reinactors or reenactments. I did it for real. It wasn't all that much fun the first time so I don't think I would get much kick out of doing it again as a reenactor. So, since I don't personally reenact, you can take my following comment for whatever it's worth.

 

I don't like the smoking bit at these events at all. Pretend to smoke? YGBSM!

Yeah, yeah, I heard what's been said: "Almost everyone smoked in WW-II and Korea...and many in Vietnam (I didn't). That may true but, as much as one might want to pretend it's 1944, it isn't; it's 2009 and virtually anyone with a brain is attempting to de-glamorize smoking to today's youth, not encourage it.

 

As someone else has said, not everyone smoked ALL the time so lighting up a fag and having one constantly dangling from one's lips really adds nothing in the way of realism to a reenactment event. What you do when you do that is glamorize smoking and encourage the kids who see you to do so.

 

My mother and father both died a slow and painful death from smoking-related diseases. Kids today still get plenty of pressure to smoke elsewhere. Why add to it and encourage it? Smoking is one little bit of "realism" that can be done without. Do 'em a favor; be socially responsible and don't push that crap on them at your reenacting events. It just is not necessary.

 

And there's my 2-cents worth.

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99% of soldiers still smoke today. Your the oddball if you dont. ;)

Dent

 

See my comment above.

 

Perhaps if smoking was not glamorized at reinacting events, only 89% of military members would be smokers. :rolleyes:

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i could go on for hours about this.. main points only tho.

 

1.) get PERIOD manuals.. screw this happy horsecrap about reference books and collector guides.. Read what the GI had to read.

 

2.) talk to the vets when you can.. foggy memory or not, thier word is more valuable than another reenactor or a writer, they were actually there.

 

3.) do research. Understand that there is more to a persona than gear and a look. there's the "why" and the "what". What did you do before the war? where did you live? what are you political views? read period magazines and papers, get a feel for events of the times.. Movies, music, books, cars. You'd have known that stuff same as you do now. Keep in mind, even jobs were different then than now, so know your job as it would have been then.

 

4.) know the unit you are pertraying (more along the research line)

 

5.) use common sense. Not everyone looks ragged, nor do they look clean.. Dump useless gear..I love the airborne morons carrying let down ropes..the occasional one is ok, but I see whole groups with them.. The guys dumped them.. That's straight from the vet's mouths..

 

6.) the best advice, pull a tour for real.. You'll learn how to duck and cover, you'll learn the results if you don't. You'll learn what you need and what you don't. You'll learn all kinds of little tricks..

 

Research is the key. Don't worry about the smoking issue or any of that.. We can't get it totally right.. You can't reenact the stench of war or the weariness. My issue with smoking is the half a cig and toss it.. That's not authentic.. You smoker that sucker to the filter, the roach, the nub, whatever.. Keep in mind, smokes dont always come up front.. you make it last.. You shouldn't smoke while in the field for patrol or ambush.. Chew either.. Those have a distinct smell and are frowned upon while in the field or on ambush or patrol. Keep yourself in the frame of mind of the time period you are doing.. Don't get into debates about current politics, reasoning or beliefs. You are there to show to your best abilities, life for a soldier of that time period. I believe you should show the truth. Don't cowtoe in to pressure about 'political correctness'.. Those people needed spanked more as children and fed a dose of reality instead of being taught that life is a fairytale where there's no bad habits, name calling, losers, or negativity. The truth of the matter is, they were soldiers, mostly young, mostly away from home and in another country for the first time. They cursed, screwed, drank, smoked, fornicated, and let off steam. Things were different then.. If we keep changing it to fit current ideas, how will true history live and be learned? It will be whitewashed and the same mistakes repeated. My 2 MPC's worth

 

Fins..

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Please don't misinterpret my following comments; I have nothing against reinactors or reenactments. I did it for real. It wasn't all that much fun the first time so I don't think I would get much kick out of doing it again as a reenactor. So, since I don't personally reenact, you can take my following comment for whatever it's worth.

 

I don't like the smoking bit at these events at all. Pretend to smoke? YGBSM!

Yeah, yeah, I heard what's been said: "Almost everyone smoked in WW-II and Korea...and many in Vietnam (I didn't). That may true but, as much as one might want to pretend it's 1944, it isn't; it's 2009 and virtually anyone with a brain is attempting to de-glamorize smoking to today's youth, not encourage it.

 

As someone else has said, not everyone smoked ALL the time so lighting up a fag and having one constantly dangling from one's lips really adds nothing in the way of realism to a reenactment event. What you do when you do that is glamorize smoking and encourage the kids who see you to do so.

 

My mother and father both died a slow and painful death from smoking-related diseases. Kids today still get plenty of pressure to smoke elsewhere. Why add to it and encourage it? Smoking is one little bit of "realism" that can be done without. Do 'em a favor; be socially responsible and don't push that crap on them at your reenacting events. It just is not necessary.

 

And there's my 2-cents worth.

 

 

 

 

I also lost my mom about 12 years ago, lung cancer, she went out the hard way. I never smoked (cigarettes) before or after the army, used to sell my cigarettes on the Black Market towards the end of the month when the money started running out. When I go to an Event over here, later on in the evening usally cigars are handed out, sometimes I do, sometimes I don't, but talk about a nasty taste the next morning! pinch.gif

Best thing to do is chew gum, if that ain't American, I don't know what is. thumbsup.gif

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See my comment above.

 

Perhaps if smoking was not glamorized at reinacting events, only 89% of military members would be smokers.

 

 

I've never smoked a day in my life.

 

I also highly doubt that reenacting has any measurable effect on active duty military. Most of the smokers that are in, came in that way, and it is not an acquired habit. I certainly don't feel a need to smoke, even being around the 99% that do smoke.

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Mercenary25

And need to meet 1940's Army physical requirements. I've seen enough of fat germans and paratroopers.

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i could go on for hours about this.. main points only tho.

 

Don't cowtoe in to pressure about 'political correctness'.. Those people needed spanked more as children and fed a dose of reality instead of being taught that life is a fairytale where there's no bad habits, name calling, losers, or negativity.

 

Fins..

 

Dear Fins..

 

Life is hardly a fairy tale and smoking does not lead to "living happily ever after." It leads to a painful death sooner or later. I resent, to the strongest degree, the puerile nature of your comment.

 

You are quite correct, however, in one aspect, mentioning the dose of reality. People who reenact are, in essence, playing a game. It is not reality; at least not to anyone who is mentally stable; they know it’s a game. One need not have a cigarette dangling from one's mouth to look the tough guy part. It's just not necessary.

 

Glamorizing smoking increases the chance of young people taking up the deadly habit.

That, my friend, is also reality, not a game.

 

Now; I've said my piece. If you wish to carry this further, please PM me. I will be happy to entertain any and all comments you might have in that medium. The boards are no place for a private watering contest.

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i could go on for hours about this.. main points only tho.

 

1.) get PERIOD manuals.. screw this happy horsecrap about reference books and collector guides.. Read what the GI had to read.

 

2.) talk to the vets when you can.. foggy memory or not, thier word is more valuable than another reenactor or a writer, they were actually there.

 

3.) do research. Understand that there is more to a persona than gear and a look. there's the "why" and the "what". What did you do before the war? where did you live? what are you political views? read period magazines and papers, get a feel for events of the times.. Movies, music, books, cars. You'd have known that stuff same as you do now. Keep in mind, even jobs were different then than now, so know your job as it would have been then.

 

4.) know the unit you are pertraying (more along the research line)

 

5.) use common sense. Not everyone looks ragged, nor do they look clean.. Dump useless gear..I love the airborne morons carrying let down ropes..the occasional one is ok, but I see whole groups with them.. The guys dumped them.. That's straight from the vet's mouths..

 

6.) the best advice, pull a tour for real.. You'll learn how to duck and cover, you'll learn the results if you don't. You'll learn what you need and what you don't. You'll learn all kinds of little tricks..

 

Research is the key. Don't worry about the smoking issue or any of that.. We can't get it totally right.. You can't reenact the stench of war or the weariness. My issue with smoking is the half a cig and toss it.. That's not authentic.. You smoker that sucker to the filter, the roach, the nub, whatever.. Keep in mind, smokes dont always come up front.. you make it last.. You shouldn't smoke while in the field for patrol or ambush.. Chew either.. Those have a distinct smell and are frowned upon while in the field or on ambush or patrol. Keep yourself in the frame of mind of the time period you are doing.. Don't get into debates about current politics, reasoning or beliefs. You are there to show to your best abilities, life for a soldier of that time period. I believe you should show the truth. Don't cowtoe in to pressure about 'political correctness'.. Those people needed spanked more as children and fed a dose of reality instead of being taught that life is a fairytale where there's no bad habits, name calling, losers, or negativity. The truth of the matter is, they were soldiers, mostly young, mostly away from home and in another country for the first time. They cursed, screwed, drank, smoked, fornicated, and let off steam. Things were different then.. If we keep changing it to fit current ideas, how will true history live and be learned? It will be whitewashed and the same mistakes repeated. My 2 MPC's worth

 

Fins..

 

 

Can't agree more.

 

Look at the period manuals to see a text book study of what was taught. When you talk to a veteran, you'll see how the text book, was relayed to real life. A lot of army knowledge is not written in text books, but taught on the job. This is something you get a good sense of when reenacting, when a new guy comes in and asks you how to wear a uniform or where gear should go.

 

Excess gear is dreaded now, as it was dreaded then. You can only learn about this, from experience or asking around. Dragging a full ruck, duffle bag, assault bag and wearing an IOTV + full battle rattle, onto a blackhawk for transport is a task. On the way home, I gurantee I'll not be taking as much with me, just from the firs time around. Another thing is the use of elbow and knee pads. Every training situation we were required to wear them, bar none. Once we got in country, it became apparent they were just a usless piece of junk carried on you, and were kept in the bay. This is a modern comparison, but it relates directly to the guys or previous time periods dropping gasmasks, and cutting down E-tools.

 

 

Unless you actually enlist, you'll never be able to get a 100% accurate picture of your chosen reenacting branch. You can get a good experience, but you have to put yourself into the frame of mind of that soldier. Soldiers are vile, cussing and perverted messes, thats just how we are. We're not "PC" and thats how it is, and I can gurantee thats how it was. Soldiering stays the same through the ages.

 

 

Dent

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Goody! new concepts and ideas added.

 

As to smoking,I also am not about to start a row there.Just wanted to say that I am a smoker,(though if these nicotine chicklets work,not much longer)and have seen no evidence that my smoking has ever influenced any kiddies,or my young team members to start,though some of my more soldierly tendencies have been emulated.

Again,larger soldiers did exist,why else did they even have uniforms big enough?let alone the many famous Stars and Stripes cartoons lampooning them or photos showing them.Yes,most of the portlies were rear echelon types and senior NCOs and officers,but exist they did.

 

I also believe it is bad form to call anyone,(airborne or not) moron,particularly when speaking of useless items.A number of vets have told me of many uses they put their let down ropes to,every thing from tying hobo rolls to improvised belts.Leggings and 28 packs are pretty useless,and I've not yet read anyone calling "legs" morons.

 

ZippoGrunt,I really need to know where you heard that the black paint was used in lieu of nickel or chrome because it would'nt stick to steel?I am neither insulting your intelligence nor being sarcastic,I truly want to know so I can give that person a piece of my mind for misleading you like that,I mislike anyone doing that to anyone.It took me awhile to figure out what was bothering my sub-concious mind about your post,till I was at the range with my nickel finished Meridan revolver and it hit me......nickel and chrome are both applied to a kajillion different steel items.I worked in the metals industry for along time after I got out of the army and knew in the back of my diminishing mind that nickel and chromium are both as rare and needful a military metal as brass.Iron,( which in case you did not know,is what steel is made from) is far more common.Paint is economical and a decent and traditional protectant for steel.Wrought iron fences were painted black for that reason same as radio flyer wagons being painted red.

 

As before,I will say that we all have opinions on how to make reenacting better,but let's please not think our personal one is the only way.It's a little like saying "My religon is the only true one and all infidels must die" We've seen where that leads.....I hope!

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,(though if these nicotine chicklets work,not much longer)

 

Col Bob, you just gave me the most fantastic Idea... for all you smokers out there who are trying to quit, or even if you arent, but might like to, wasn't the Wrigley's PK gum candy coated like a chiclet? Wrap the darn things like a piece of PK gum and viola!!! No one would ever know you were chewing Nicotine gum!!! Of course, you could give it to your smoking friends when they ask for some gum... hehe

 

I am finding everything I possibly can that can be used as an alternative for the K Rations I'm putting together to make them as close to the originals as I can.

 

Wayne

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Johan Willaert

This topic is about realism in re-enacting and not solely about smoking.

Smoking is bad for your health and that does not need any more clarification and no-one needs to be attacked or feel attacked because he smokes or doesn't smoke...

 

BUT!!!!

 

It would be a shame to see a young re-enactor start smoking just because 'they all smoked' in 1944....

 

This same advice was given by the French Militaria Magazine in 1985 when they did an article about US WW2 GI cigarettes...

Seems it hasn't all changed that much....

 

So enough about smoking and let's stick to Re-enactment.....

 

Johan

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Zippo Grunt

 

 

ZippoGrunt,I really need to know where you heard that the black paint was used in lieu of nickel or chrome because it would'nt stick to steel?I am neither insulting your intelligence nor being sarcastic,I truly want to know so I can give that person a piece of my mind for misleading you like that,I mislike anyone doing that to anyone.It took me awhile to figure out what was bothering my sub-concious mind about your post,till I was at the range with my nickel finished Meridan revolver and it hit me......nickel and chrome are both applied to a kajillion different steel items.I worked in the metals industry for along time after I got out of the army and knew in the back of my diminishing mind that nickel and chromium are both as rare and needful a military metal as brass.Iron,( which in case you did not know,is what steel is made from) is far more common.Paint is economical and a decent and traditional protectant for steel.Wrought iron fences were painted black for that reason same as radio flyer wagons being painted red.

 

 

You bring up a good point,and i should of stated that the Black Crackle Paint was baked on by Zippo. His helped the paint stay on the Steel,casing. But not to well,as it did wear down alot on the outer edges. As it intended to become brittle and chip off. Mint condition Black and the rarer Red Crackle painted Zippos are quite sort after. But alot of collectors also like the general wear n tear look. With alot of these Zippos with over 90% loss of paint.

 

Zippo did first use chrome on their Wartime lighters im not sure of the year these first came out could be 1941/42 (will ask Linda the Zippo historian) but they stopped making them within a few months. The painting was also probably cheaper and faster than chromium plating,and the military wanted a lighter which didn't reflect the light, thereby avoiding the attention of enemy snipers.

 

 

I get my information from various places. But mostly from the Zippo Click website, of which im a member,plus over 20+ years of collecting,various books, (Zippo the great american lighter by David Poore) and alot of good Zippo friends. smokin.gif

post-4917-1240348052.jpg

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What’s the number one thing we can all do to improve things? Portray the norm, not the exception! :blink: You can have an unusual impression (I’m doing a War Correspondent a lot these days, can’t get much stranger than that) but do it the way most people did whatever it is back then. Don’t be that one (or more than one) guy in every re-enacting unit who has to show up with the unusual items, trying to set themselves away from everyone else. We’ve all seen the type. Maybe they bring strange stuff to be able to pick themselves out of event photos later, I don’t know. We all bring odd stuff from time to time, often out of ignorance (guilty as charged myself on a few occasions) but if you know your left-handed widget wasn’t in the hands of many (or any) men in your portrayed unit at the time, LEAVE IT AT HOME! It’s called a “uniform” for a reason, people!

The number two thing is to avoid the attraction of movies. When I got into WW2 re-enacting in the late 80s, the focus was on the Germans. And why? Because all the good movies were about them up to that point. You couldn’t go to an event without people reciting lines from “Cross of Iron” and films like that. Few GI units wanted to emulate movies back then. Times sure have changed. Sure, there are people who re-enacted 2nd Rangers BEFORE “Private Ryan” came out or 506th before “Band of Brothers” was filmed. But the majority of people into the ‘movie units’ jumped on the bandwagon after the fact. Can anyone name more than one or two 2nd Ranger of 506th re-enacting units before these films were made? Whether they wanted to be like the guys in the movies or not is subject to debate. But I doubt there’s a re-enacting group anywhere that doesn’t have a 506th unit in it today. Hardly anyone was doing that specific unit before the late 90s. Funny how it’s been over ten years since “Ryan” came out and the Ranger units are slowly disappearing. You be the judge how that all happened. Let’s face facts, if everyone REALLY “did it for the vets” you wouldn’t see half the GI’s at an event dressed like paratroopers, would you? No, you’d see better representation of the vets that didn’t get cool movies or TV series made about them.

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force scout

It is my opinion that there are essentially two different reenacting venues. They are the Public events and the Private tacticals and each should be addressed individually. In the Public venue I think strong emphasis needs to be placed on public education by the most knowledgeable member(s) of a unit. Perhaps dressed in a class B uniform giving a short but informed unit history in front of a display (which we all love to show off) of the correct weapons and equipment used by that unit. Maybe some of the younger (more "authentic") looking members dressed in full field gear nearby doing routine parade and drill formations would make an informative impression. Avoid the politics and give straightforward information and I feel this should give the public good information without leaving them with a distasteful view of us as "yahoo wannabes". Furthermore, in all public displays unit leaders must convey to the membership in attendance the importance of the utmost self discipline while in the public eye. Civility at all times to the members of the public even in the face of the agitators who seem to appear at every public event to debate us about being "gun nuts, nazis, add your ownd description here. The public event is for the public's education and enjoyment. The private tactical is for us.

 

In the private tacticals i attend, I participate to enjoy the closest experience I can get to participating in the conflict. Pitting our unit's knowledge of scouting, patrolling, ambushing, etc. against our adversaries. I love pitting my stealthiness against others and participating in these mock battles where we hunt our greatest adversaries, each other. I think the best way to improve at the private event lies mostly in respecting each other as allies or adversaries. The biggest bummer is calling hits, or worse, argueing about them. That is my greatest pet peeve, that and just plain arrogance against one another. If I didn't see you shoot at me, that doesn't mean I won't take a hit, I just didn't see you. I will do a nice hollywood style hit anytime just because I know that my adversaries enjoy the show. The biggest part of the word reenactor is actor. I don't mind putting on a show and like to see one myself. Also, small unit tactics need constant work. The men depended on each other for their lives and had to KNOW what the other guys would do in a fight. PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE! You will not only work together smoothly, you adversaries will see this and admire the dedication your unit puts into working well together. Thanks for enduring my rant.

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  • 3 months later...
Lucky 7th Armored
nice dog, what breed is it? didnt the Marines use Dobermans in the Pacific to help find Japanese hiding in spider holes?

 

I read that Dobermans were trained not to bark, they were trained to growl slightly when they found the enemy and the dog handler could feel the dog's throat to tell if he found something.

They are doing a show on these dogs on the military channel next wednesday, looks pretty interesting

Haydn

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Laury Allison

To answer the original question:

 

Enlist in the armed service of your choice and spend a few years learning how things are done. If you still want to play soldier after that...then you will know how.

 

:w00t: :lol:

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pwmiraldi67
And need to meet 1940's Army physical requirements. I've seen enough of fat germans and paratroopers.

 

AMEN!!! Don't be 100 pounds over weight in an XXL set of fake tigerstripe portraying a LRRP/Ranger/SOG RT memeber!!!!!!!! PLEASE!!!

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Nice to see you here Possum...

 

As someone said:

"Another thing, people should take things far less personally then they sometimes do. I've seen on (other) forums where people post pictures of their impression asking for comments/criticisims and then act like you just slapped their mother when you actually give them. They're commenting on your uniform, your helmet, your webgear, hardly ever you (asides from occasionally a physical comment). There is a certain amount of pride one puts in their impression, but if they're mature enough to be involved in a hobby such as this one they should be mature enough to take legitimate criticism if they subject themself to it. Again, this type of attitude only applies to certain people, and not very many at that."

 

I would say that posting photos of yerself or yer group in a public forum opens yerself to critique in the first instance, especially where authenticity is concerned...Simply patting each other on the back does no service at all to the betterment of the hobby, if this where the case, we would still be in the 1970s porn tasche flairy trousered free for all battles, and at best farby heaven where any and all sundry is worn (and was..Aw, hang on a sec...Still is sometimes)...

 

Now one could argue that one has to "keep yer opinion to yerself", fair point, but that would be a bit two faced don't ye think? Better to let the poor chap know if he or indeed she, is making a mistake, albeit a very subjective mistake...And the hobby would stagnate...

 

I would say in a positive vein that to make the WWII impression more authentic then would be to get oneself into the mindset of a young teenager from the country your representing, and not a middle aged (like myself) parent in the 21st Century, if you have been a career soldier in say, the British Army, then forget a lot of your indoctrination (but keep the basics)...If your portraying an older chap, then still, get into the mindset, the cultural difference between then and now...the norm was a person who joined up to get the job done and return back to a normal civilian life...Some where conscripted in a time when people where clamouring to join up, tells ye something doesn't it?

 

Visually?...I can't speak for our re-enacting friends in the north Americas, only for the UK...But I question the motives of anyone who shrinks their 1940s impression beret down to resemble their own tight fitting beret that they wore whilst serving in a modern British Army, and wearing it in a similar fashion, much less someone who does the same with and wears a U.S Army beanie cap like this (resting on the eyebrowse):

beret.jpg

I just don't get wearing a 1940s US Army uniform in a modern British Army fashion...As much as, but not as bad as wearing it like some modern pop idol...

 

One little detail that is easily rectified, takes VERY little effort to think about, yet the impact is mountainous...Unless ofcourse it doesn't matter, then I think I'll wear my helmet backwards, "coz itz cool hip hop dude"...

 

Someone mentioned about sloppiness, I got a photo of a sign which was posted at the base where my group resides, and in this there's all sorts of fines for not wearing the uniform correctly...My point is...There must have been a need for it?

EDIT: Here it is;

GIrules.jpg

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But I doubt there’s a re-enacting group anywhere that doesn’t have a 506th unit in it today.

 

Let’s face facts, if everyone REALLY “did it for the vets” you wouldn’t see half the GI’s at an event dressed like paratroopers, would you? No, you’d see better representation of the vets that didn’t get cool movies or TV series made about them.

 

Oh, don't talk about THAT movie about the FSSF :crying: ;)

 

We don't do 506th, have thought about the 509..Will be doing 550th in France in a couple of weeks (and only one day I think it is)...But apart from that, no, we only do FSSF...

 

But I know what yer saying, perhaps if we did do any amount of Airborne units, we would probably get more recruits...

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giconceptsjw

I’ve read every response here and a lot of very good points have been made. Having spent over 20 years re-enacting WWII beginning in the early 80’s I’ve personally experienced a lot of the same frustration most of you have. It’s nice to see that I’m not alone and others share my anguish over the BS and my desire to improve things.

 

I stopped attending re-enactments several years ago because I got completely burned out on it. I don’t ever plan to attend another WWII re-enactment.

 

My reasons for giving up on re-enacting are a combination of all the valid complaints you guys have listed here, plus a few of my own.

 

Please don’t take offence if you are currently re-enacting. As a game, social activity, recreational hobby, sport and pastime it can be one of the best and a hell of a lot of fun. I support re-enacting and re-enactors 100%. I did it for a long time but ultimately discovered, it’s just not for me anymore. However, there is absolutely nothing wrong with re-enacting for re-enacting’s sake as long as you enjoy it.

 

The best re-enacting anecdote I ever heard came from a WWII US Navy submarine veteran. He came by Fort Macarthur & asked what we were all about. After someone explained WWII re-enacting to him, he said he couldn’t imagine why anyone would want to do that. He told us, if you want to re-enact my WWII experience, here’s what you should do; Build a box 5 feet wide and 10 feet long. Put a tiny little 1 inch ventilation hole in it & make sure it has no doors or windows. Get a garden hose & fill the box with 6 inches of standing water on the floor. Put a running lawnmower in the box for constant noise & exhaust fumes. Run an electric light into the box with the dimmest 10 watt light bulb you can find. Shut yourself up inside the box under those conditions for 10 or 15 hours and imagine the box could implode on you & crush you to death at any moment. Do that every day for a month. Now there’s an authentic re-enacting scenario for you.

 

J.W.

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WOW Jeff ,

But you forgot to mention the light fixture must be USN issue as well as the bulb and come from a packing crate with 1943 stamped on the outside .

owen

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