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Curtiss P-40 Warhawk


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  • 2 months later...
  • 3 months later...
Johnny Signor
Yes, a sad end indeed...

 

That photo was taken at Walnut Ridge in Arkansas. Here's some more shots of P-40s at Walnut Ridge. They appear to be mostly, if not all, P-40Ns... including a number of TP-40Ns.

 

P-40WalnutRidge001a.jpg

 

P-40WalnutRidge002a.jpg

 

P-40WalnutRidge003a.jpg

 

P-40WalnutRidge004a.jpg

 

P-40WalnutRidge005a.jpg

These next three photos also show P-47s, P-51s and at least one P-63. Perhaps there are others as well, but I haven't examined them closely yet.

 

FightersWalnutRidge002a.jpg

 

There is a C-47 on Floats in one of these photos off to the right,just wanted to note this.

 

FightersWalnutRidge003a.jpg

 

FightersWalnutRidge001a.jpg

Here's a closeup of the P-40s from the above photo...

 

FightersWalnutRidge001z.jpg

 

All photos: Walnut Ridge Army Flying School Museum

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Johnny Signor
More Curtiss P-40's, Random Shots of Various Units and P-40's.... :thumbsup:

 

Enjoy!

 

P-40 Running Up At Dutch Harbor, Alaska This aircraft is from the 11th Fighter Squadron and the 343rd group

 

P40_Dutch_Harbor_Alaska.jpg

 

P-40 At The Firing Range

 

P-40_Firing_Range.jpg

 

A Flight 18th Pursuit Squadron P-40's, August 1st, 1941:

 

18th_Pursuit_Squadron_1941_1.jpg

 

P-40 Of The 8th Pursuit Squadron

 

22nd_Pursuit_Squadron_P40.jpg

 

P-40 Of The 20th Pursuit Squadron

 

20th_Pursuit_Squadron_P40.jpg

 

P-40 Of The 35th Pursuit Squadron

 

35th_Pursuit_Squadron_P40.jpg

 

P-40 Of The 95th Pursuit Squadron

 

95thPursuit_Squadron_P40.jpg

 

Regards,

FRISCAN

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  • 4 weeks later...
  • 2 years later...

Wow... been a long time since I started this thread. I kinda fell off the radar for a while and had pretty much forgotten about it.

 

Let's see if we can't give this baby a kick-start and get 'er goin' again...

 

 

Before I get into it, I gotta say that I really wish there were a master list of all the various codes used at stateside airfields during WWII. I'm actually working on compiling one myself, but it would have been nice to have a substantial starting point.

 

Okay... I'm not entirely sure of the who, what, where, when, how, and why of this photo... well, I do know the 'what'... it's a P-40N. And it appears to be a Boss bird. But as for the rest, well, my research indicates that this photo was probably taken at Key Field, Mississippi in late 1943 or early to mid-1944 and that the ship is possibly from the 75th TRG. But I'm simply not sure. Thank goodness for that L-5 in the background, otherwise I would not have gotten this far!

 

P-40NKeyFieldposs75RG001a.jpg

Project 914 Archives (S.Donacik collection)

 

 

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Here's one that I picked up recently...

 

This photo was taken at Tulsa Municipal Airport on March 23rd, 1941 and shows nine P-40Bs and a single LB-30.

 

You can see more photos and read a bit about this event on THIS page from my website...

 

TulsaMar41001a.jpg

Project 914 Archives (S.Donacik collection)

 

 

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Here's one from a photo group I picked up back when I posted here regularly...

 

'Tis the Boss bird from the 35th PS, 8th PG... late 1940 or early 1941.

 

Scan-111114-0001a.jpg

Project 914 Archives (S.Donacik collection)

 

 

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Another recent addition to the collection... P-40Ns from the 23rd FG...

 

Scan-111103-0001a.jpg

Project 914 Archives (S.Donacik collection)

 

Scan-111103-0001z1.jpg

 

Scan-111103-0001z2.jpg

 

 

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Alrighty... I picked this up on ____ * fairly recently.

 

*(insert preferred catchy nickname for epay, errr.. ebay)

 

B-25Depot001.jpg

Project 914 Archives (S.Donacik collection)

 

 

For the most part, I've kinda limited myself to acquiring P-40 and other Curtiss-related stuff nowadays and

although the main subject is obviously not a P-40, I did catch a glimpse of something interesting in the

background while looking at the auction image.

 

Although I was not entirely sure of what I was seeing, it looked close enough to a P-40 that I took a chance...

and besides, if it turned out to be something else, there's an A-18 just behind the B-25, so not all would be lost!

Also, I kinda like B-25s, so it was win-win regardless.

 

Anyhoo, I was glad to see that it was indeed a Tirp... I mean, P-40 in the background.

 

She's a ship from the 31st PG HQ flight...

 

P-40Depot001.jpg

 

 

Oh, and it's not a Hawk, but what the hell... early 1st PG P-38s are groovy!

 

P-38Depot001.jpg

 

 

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Here's a super-groovy shot... I may just break down and get me a print of this from one'a those

'art-poster' outfits, or maybe directly from National Geographic. Unless I can find one cheaper

than forty freakin' bucks, that is!

 

Anyhoo, this is a four-ship of 16th PG P-40Cs over Trinidad... they're from the 43rd PS, I think.

 

38-3869-SY8JF00Z-1.jpg

National Geographic (Luis Marden photo)

 

 

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here is a recent pickup. Not the best of scan had to "backdoor" scan on my backup scanner.

 

Mike

 

post-1387-1252471029.jpg

Dat's nice... the fella looks kinda familiar... no other info to go with this?

 

 

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Thanks a lot for sharing. :thumbsup:

I really love those early P-40B and C. I have always wanted to have good 1/72 or 1/48 model of one of them but not one manufacturer of plastic scale models offers P-40B or C with proper shape, dimensions and proportions.

 

The B and C are the most beautiful of entire P-40 family.

 

Regards

 

Gregory

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I'll agree there... I dig the Hawk H81s just a bit more than the H87s myself!

 

And I too am hoping that someone will produce a truly well-done P-40/B/C in any scale...

preferably 48th or 32nd, but it really doesn't matter. With a few minor qualifications, I have

to say that Hasegagme did a wonderful job with the 87s, but I just want to see somebody,

anybody, finally get the 81s right all the way through. There's a good number of subjects

I'd like to build and I don't wanna have to kit-bash them all... lol

 

We can dream... :lol:

 

 

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And I too am hoping that someone will produce a truly well-done P-40/B/C in any scale...

preferably 48th or 32nd, but it really doesn't matter. With a few minor qualifications, I have

to say that Hasegagme did a wonderful job with the 87s, but I just want to see somebody,

anybody, finally get the 81s right all the way through.

For many years I correct and rebuild old Frog's 1/72 early P-40 but this is like nightmare -- every part of this model must be corrected.

 

:)

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Cobrahistorian

Wow! Busy morning, huh Steve? :)

 

Great pics! I'll post a couple from my 57th FG grouping shortly.

 

As for accurizing the Hawk 81, I'm working on that right now in 48th scale. The major issue with the Academy kit is the radiator trough isn't deep enough. I cut that off and installed the radiator trough from the Monogram kit. Looks good, has the proper depth, etc. Needs a bit of tweaking but overall it looks good. I need to do a better back side of the radiator (the part that can be seen through the cowl flaps) and I may continue to pursue casting it in resin. I've talked about it with a friend of mine who owns an aftermarket company, so it may be a future project. I'd like to finish mine first though!

 

I'm building it as P-40C 41-13333, one of the Sierra P-40s that was recovered and turned into a Class 26 airframe trainer. I've got it's data plate and I'm working on it (and 8 other models!) right now.

 

Jon

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My best buddy at work told me about a photo he had of his dad from WWII who was a mechanic for 'some kind of old plane' -

 

He had a beat up, torn 8X10 and wanted me to restore it if I could. It took him a year to get the photo to me and it was a mess, but I was astounded when I saw it. I took a while to take all the tears out, etc but it was a labor of love. His dad is on the right and he's the spitting image of my buddy. His dad is long gone - he fathered my buddy when he was in his sixties.

 

It's almost sad so many people don't know anything about aircraft of WWII, but I guess it's up to people like those on this forum to 'keep em flying'

 

CopyofP40Medium.jpg

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I took these photos of the CAF P-40 at a show in the piney woods of east Texas.

 

When invited to attend a weekend long show, we usually fly there on Friday afternoon. Usually the promoter will have a nice party with great food, etc at the air field and then take everyone to the closest motel in vans. If at all possible, I usually stayed at the air field on Friday night so I could try to get photos early Saturday before all the spectators arrive. During the shows, it gets very hot in Texas, but the nights are pleasant, and walking around just before dawn is wonderfully cool. I often brought a small tent, or sometimes would sleep on a couch at the FBO office. Getting up just before dawn was almost surreal when you get to look at all the planes that arrived later on Friday. I took some of my best photos this way.

 

P_40.jpg

 

DSC04294.jpg

 

DSC04293.jpg

 

P-40best.jpg

 

 

This is a P-40 adversary of course. ('Tora' aircraft in CAF jargon) I really liked the rising sun rays coming up behind it.

 

Risingsun-1.jpg

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Great pics! I'll post a couple from my 57th FG grouping shortly.

 

I'm building it as P-40C 41-13333, one of the Sierra P-40s that was recovered and turned into a Class 26 airframe trainer. I've got it's data plate and I'm working on it (and 8 other models!) right now.

 

Jon

Looking forward to the 57th pics and to seeing the model when it's done.

 

At first I hadn't a clue what you were talking about when you said 'Sierra P-40s' but after a quickie search

my memory was jostled. I've got a rag laying around here somewhere with an article on that episode, I

think... Air Classics or Wings/Airpower maybe?

 

My best buddy at work told me about a photo he had of his dad from WWII who was a mechanic for 'some kind of old plane' -

 

He had a beat up, torn 8X10 and wanted me to restore it if I could. It took him a year to get the photo to me and it was a mess, but I was astounded when I saw it. I took a while to take all the tears out, etc but it was a labor of love. His dad is on the right and he's the spitting image of my buddy. His dad is long gone - he fathered my buddy when he was in his sixties.

 

It's almost sad so many people don't know anything about aircraft of WWII, but I guess it's up to people like those on this forum to 'keep em flying'

 

CopyofP40Medium.jpg

Super groovy!

 

Any idea as to when and where this was taken? Those numbers on the cowl make me think of Peterson Field,

but of course there were probably a dozen different outfits and airfields operating P-40s with the same basic

kind of markings. I do photo restoration as well... looks like you did a good job, guy.

 

And I dig those shots of the CAF P-40N... especially that first one. I too like to shoot in the morning, for a

couple reasons... same as you, to beat the crowd, but also because the light can be very moody and/or dramatic.

 

Here's some I grabbed early AM at Geneseo back in 2008... sadly, the Hawk on the right of the first shot, and its

owner/pilot, Bob Baranaskas, are no longer with us. :(

 

2773941269_ed9a2cdab5_o.jpg

 

2665357300_f3345d34a7_o.jpg

 

2664532593_e099277e45_o.jpg

 

2664531763_61df6cdc22_o.jpg

 

2665356656_3ae24990c7_o.jpg

 

2664532127_4a92542fb3_o.jpg

 

 

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Cobrahistorian

Here's a few 66th FS machines. First up is P-40F 41-1388? (last digit is illegible).

 

66thFS106resized.jpg

 

Next, I had to include this Vichy French Hawk 75 that came with the grouping!

66thFS062resized.jpg

 

"Buckeye Blitz II"

 

 

66thFS058resized.jpg

 

And if I could ever find a shot of the tail of this bird, I'd have it's ID complete! I've got 3 different shots of this airplane and none show the tail!

66thFSresized.jpg

 

 

As for the Sierra P-40s, here's the article where I learned about them:

 

http://www.donrjordan.com/sierra_p-40s.html

 

My bird, 41-13333 was flown by Lt. Ralph Mathews (Incorrectly identified on the Aviationarchaeology.com database as 41-19333) who went on to fly P-38s in the Aleutians and earn a posthumous Silver Star.

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Steve, First off good to see you back in the air so to speak. :thumbsup:

As for this image it cam with about 4-5 other P-40 negatives so no information at all. I will post some of the other images. The fellow looks like a guy I used to work with so other than that I couldn't help with ID.

 

Mike

Dat's nice... the fella looks kinda familiar... no other info to go with this?

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I once encountered (at a backyard picnic in MD, circa 1970) a FRENCH pilot veteran who had flown Hawk 75a's and loved them to pieces. His first exposure to the Hawk was when a French aircraft carrier picked them up and ferried them back to Europe; he was on board as a helper/liaison officer and got a trip to the Curtiss plant in Buffalo, and DC out of it.

 

He was in Morocco when we invaded in Nov 42 and made some sweeps against the beaches with "flights" of Hawks, but no air-to-air against USAAF or USN. He and his usual aircraft survived and surrendered, but he was not allowed to fly the Hawks again, which were parked, de-gunned and emptied of fuel. He and the other pilots were then assigned to "assist" the USAAF. This assistance was focused on recreation and amounted to acting as tour guides and arranging for restaurants, night clubs and "dates".

 

Eventually he and his mates got their hands on P-40Fs and flew operationally "to Tunis". He helped in the Great Turkey Shoot, shooting down a handful of German planes, one a Bf109 and the others transports. He told me that IF the French recognized shared victories or on-ground kills (which he said they did not), he would be a double ace.

 

Once Tunisia was secured, they were disbanded and sent, as individuals, to the UK and US for retraining. He was declared unsuited for FIGHTERS in the US (!!?? lack of experience for sure!)) so wound up flying transports in the MTO for a year, until Free French B-26 units were "hiring". He finished the war on Marauders. Post-war he emigrated to Atlanta and worked for Eastern Airlines (not as a pilot). He never flew again after the war.

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Cobrahistorian
I once encountered (at a backyard picnic in MD, circa 1970) a FRENCH pilot veteran who had flown Hawk 75a's and loved them to pieces. His first exposure to the Hawk was when a French aircraft carrier picked them up and ferried them back to Europe; he was on board as a helper/liaison officer and got a trip to the Curtiss plant in Buffalo, and DC out of it.

 

He was in Morocco when we invaded in Nov 42 and made some sweeps against the beaches with "flights" of Hawks, but no air-to-air against USAAF or USN. He and his usual aircraft survived and surrendered, but he was not allowed to fly the Hawks again, which were parked, de-gunned and emptied of fuel. He and the other pilots were then assigned to "assist" the USAAF. This assistance was focused on recreation and amounted to acting as tour guides and arranging for restaurants, night clubs and "dates".

 

Eventually he and his mates got their hands on P-40Fs and flew operationally "to Tunis". He helped in the Great Turkey Shoot, shooting down a handful of German planes, one a Bf109 and the others transports. He told me that IF the French recognized shared victories or on-ground kills (which he said they did not), he would be a double ace.

 

Once Tunisia was secured, they were disbanded and sent, as individuals, to the UK and US for retraining. He was declared unsuited for FIGHTERS in the US (!!?? lack of experience for sure!)) so wound up flying transports in the MTO for a year, until Free French B-26 units were "hiring". He finished the war on Marauders. Post-war he emigrated to Atlanta and worked for Eastern Airlines (not as a pilot). He never flew again after the war.

 

 

The Hawk pic I posted may very well be one of his unit's Hawks then. This pic was taken in North Africa in late 42/early 43 and came with a 400+ photo grouping from a Corporal in the 66th FS.

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