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Appears to be a M1912 summer service coat that was converted to the 1924 uniform specifications. Many M1912 wool and summer coats were converted to open lapels, but the button holes were not changed so the converted coats had rather short lapels. There may be a contract label, that would tell much, in the lower right pocket (lower left as you're looking at the coat).

 

An indication of conversion is the lapels are slightly different material or color shade than the coat.

 

If there is no indication of use; insignia pin holes, evidence of sewn rank insignia, laundry marks and etc., it may have never been issued or if issued not used in service.

 

There weren't a great number of the coats converted, as new uniforms were produced and issued fairly rapidly. As was usually the case the regular Army was outfitted first and then the reserves.

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That's what I thought at first also but there is no evidence that there was ever a button hole near the collar which I think would be the case with a conversion. There is no tag in the pocket. No evidence of insignia holes in the collar. The jacket has been used as there is sweat stains in the arm pits. Maybe private made?

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This photo may be an answer to the quiz. This is an RPPC of an unidentified man with a sort of a uniform that resembles your coat. The patch on his lower sleeve is embroidered "CAMP, A.LA., LIBRARY" and he has collar pins "A.LA." He is apparantly a civilian employee or volunteer. The "uniform" and overall appearance suggest WWI. It occurs to me that there quite a few organization that wore uniforms that may have preferred a coat with lapels as is yours and the fellow in this image. The buttons on his coat are standard Army buttons.

 

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The US Forest Service and the National Park Service wore uniforms then which were very similar to military uniforms (in fact the first National Park "rangers" were US Army troops assigned to protect Yellowstone Nat. Park).

 

Here are some 1907 Forest Service Rangers (who preceeded National Park Service Rangers):

 

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Here's a 1920 Park Service uniform:

 

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There were quite few different styles used from 1900 to 1920 but at one point the Park Service did use uniforms that were a cross between the old Army uniform and a man's dress coat and with Army buttons.

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I was thinking CCC but any of the other semi military organizations might also fit. The buttons are attached on the back with the cotter pin type fasteners and not sewn. So any buttons could easily have been put on or removed on the uniform including surplus bronzed Eagle buttons like are on it now.

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  • 2 weeks later...

 

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I purchased this at an auction along with a WWI and II uniform. I have been unable to find any information on it, any help will be great. There are no tags anywhere and it is made of what feels like a light canvas.

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It could be a fraternal lodge uniform. I am not sure which one though. Before radio and through the 20's and 30's lodges were a very popular form of social interaction and there were many. Most had uniforms that were military in appearance.

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That's what I was thinkng as well. The coat has the influence of the 1895 sack coat, but, as far as I know, it was never produced in a summer weight for the military.

I am actively seeking USMC Named Good Conduct Medals and items pertaining to the USS Indianapolis CA35.



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  • 5 months later...

This gentleman's picture is indeed from WW1

 

The A.L.A. on the coat stands for "American Library Association" One of many organizations that did aid work at the camps and overseas during the war. They employed both men and women. Mostly the Association ran camp libraries, but they also conducted book drives, and fought official censorship.

 

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Officially, thier uniform was forrest green, however in practice olive drab is more common.

 

The American Library Association is still in existence. They are a professional association of librarians.

 

Chris

 

This photo may be an answer to the quiz. This is an RPPC of an unidentified man with a sort of a uniform that resembles your coat. The patch on his lower sleeve is embroidered "CAMP, A.LA., LIBRARY" and he has collar pins "A.LA." He is apparantly a civilian employee or volunteer. The "uniform" and overall appearance suggest WWI. It occurs to me that there quite a few organization that wore uniforms that may have preferred a coat with lapels as is yours and the fellow in this image. The buttons on his coat are standard Army buttons.

 

post-85-1168295396.jpg

 

post-85-1168295414.jpg

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