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Planes, Names and Dames


Hawk914
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Guest thirtybg
Here's some photos of 'Sally' that I promised.

Thanks for those Wolf. It is sort of weird with the different styles of lettering.

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  • 2 weeks later...
Here are a couple that Dad had brought back. They were taken on Guam in 1945.

Nice!

 

'Poison Ivy' was an F-13A, serial #42-24585, of the 3rd Photo Squadron. According to one of my references, the name was derived from the ship's crew chief, a Sgt. Ivey.

 

'Double Exposure' was an F-13A, serial #42-24877, also of the 3rd Photo Squadron. This photo was apparently taken before the ship had flown any missions, as there would be mission markings in the form of camera lenses at the tip of the nose. Four of these had white coffee pots superimposed, indicating missions flown over Java! I'll see if I can scan an image showing these mission markings...

 

For those who may wonder what an F-13A is... the F-13s were recon variants of the B-29.

 

 

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Here's a fairly common photo showing a B-17F named 'Snoozin' Suzan' which served with the 97th and 99th Bomb Groups before being salvaged.

 

SnoozinSuzan001c.jpg

Project 914 Archives

 

 

I say that this is a fairly common photo because it's been used in a number of publications and shows up for sale every now and again. I think this was a souvenir photo of sorts, probably because, in addition to showing a (now) well-known aircraft with a pin-up, it also shows a (then) well-known fella who is in the center of the photo. Anyone care to make an ID? Should be easy...

 

 

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The balding gent on the right is Eddie Rickenbacker, he made a tour of N.Africa in 1943, Mark.

Dat's da guy...

 

 

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I didn't think anyone would believe me if I told them about this one, so I copied it for proof. It was in an album that was auctioned off. If the winner of the auction is a forum member and wants me to delete it, I'll be glad to. The album was put together by a GI stationed in Alaska in WWII.

post-70-1176645997.jpg

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  • 3 months later...
IMPERIAL QUEST

I hope it is ok to post the ones that I have. They are not old photos of aircraft in the period, instead, these are photos I took about 18 years ago during an airshow.

 

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Old Man Moe was my wife's grandfather's plane before he switched over to bombers (he was in from 1940 to 1965). 5th AF, 433rd Troop Carrier Group, 69th Troop Carrier Squadron.

 

Moe%201.jpg

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I actually met one of the pilots of "Hells Angels Out of Chute 13," Capt. Julian A. Roadman. He came through the museum I was working at in 2001, we struck up a conversation, and he told me about serving as a pilot in WW II. We corresponded after meeting, and he sent me a chapter of his unpublished memoir detailing his first bombing mission, which was in "Hells Angels Out of Chute 13." He described the plane thus:

"Hells Angels Out of Chute 13 was delived to Deenethorpe on New Years Day 1944. In its ten and a half months of combat, the ship had not aborted a mission, but it had deteriorated greatly from enemy gunfire, extreme flying conditions and exposure to the weather. There were dozens of unpainted Alclad patches of various shapes and sizes pop-rivited on the scratched olive-drab skin, and dents were numerous. There was no doubt that Hells Angels Out of Chute 13 had been pierced by much shrapnel and bullets in previous encounters with the enemy. Exaust gases and leaky engine oil discolored the cowling and wings. Hells Angels Out of Chute 13 had the reputation of a hard luck aircraft since it barely returned from most of its mission over enemy territory - but it had always returned!"

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