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This can does not have all of the raised stampings on its sides like the WW2 versions, but it does have the raised cartridge stamped on the lid. Could this be Korean War vintage? All comments welcome and much appreciated. Thanks, Al Hirschler in Dallas.

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This can does not have all of the raised stampings on its sides like the WW2 versions, but it does have the raised cartridge stamped on the lid. Could this be Korean War vintage? All comments welcome and much appreciated. Thanks, Al Hirschler in Dallas.

post-12790-1328971151.jpg

post-12790-1328971176.jpg

donation2010.gifdonation2011.gifdonation2012.gifdonation2013.gif
donation2014.gifdonation2015.gifdonation2016.gifdonation2017.gif

donation2018.gifdonation2019.gifdonation2020.gif

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This site has some excellent info on ammo boxes & cans: http://browningmgs.com/ Just scroll down to the Ammo Boxes listings.

 

That can looks like the more modern ones, but I don't recall them having the metal loop near the latch end. Perhaps it is an earlier can, possibly from the Korean War era, but I am far from an expert.

 

Remember that some National Guard units, and possibly others used .30 cal ammo well into the 1960s and even 1970s. The Ohio NG was firing M1 Garands at Kent State in 1970. I don't know if they still had .30 cal machineguns, though.

Collecting 3rd Armored Division items of all kinds from all eras, specializing in the 36th Armored Infantry Regiment.

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