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My WW1 Uniform Collection


Dave
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A nice group with matching painted helmet to Walter H. Custer from Kansas Station OH, who enlisted in April 1917. He served in Co. F, 2nd Ammo Train in the AEF from Jan 1918 to August 1919 and was discharged in August 1919.

CusterWH.jpg

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This group belonged to Charles Dippold, who served with the 102nd Machine Gun Battalion, 26th Division during WW1 and later in WW2 as a SGT in the HQ. Tng. Detachment, New Haven CT from September 1942 to his discharge in October 1943. Interestingly, I have yet to find a Purple Heart card for him, and requests for his service record have ended up with only his WW2 service being returned. His PH is a late 40s/early 50s piece, and it appears privately engraved. Perhaps a catch-up award of some sort? Mysteries... Of course, more research is ongoing...

DippoldCW.jpg

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Gil-

 

Here's the pic! I don't know anything more about the soldier...I bought this from a fellow forum member who's probably the most reputable out there dealing with these items... perhaps he might have more of the story?

 

Dave

 

What is the collar brass? I am thinking that I am seeing a red rooster rather than an oozlefinch. The latter was some sort of pelican. I believe the red rooster was used by the ambulance corps, so perhap Medical Corps or transportation brass would be what I would expect to see.

 

Now, I say this not being an expert by any means. I also admit that my memory is cloudy at times. Perhaps another member can add remarks.

 

G

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This group belonged to Lee R. McGlothern, from Winfield, Kansas. He served from April 1918 to June 1919 with Co. C, 353rd Infantry, 89th Division. He served at the front from August 1918 to November 1918.

McGlothernLR.jpg

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My last one for tonight...so many more to come...

 

Anyway, this one is a trunk group that belonged to Leo L. Mather, Battery C, 149th Field Artillery, 42nd Division. There's more in the trunk, but I remember the pain of putting the trunk up and had serious second thoughts about taking it down for the photo! So, you get the items that I had on display here for a while, but the neatest items from the group nevertheless!

MatherLL.jpg

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What is the collar brass? I am thinking that I am seeing a red rooster rather than an oozlefinch. The latter was some sort of pelican. I believe the red rooster was used by the ambulance corps, so perhap Medical Corps or transportation brass would be what I would expect to see.

 

Now, I say this not being an expert by any means. I also admit that my memory is cloudy at times. Perhaps another member can add remarks.

 

G

 

Gil-

 

I always thought it looked rooster-ish too, but it was sold to me as an oozlefinch so I assumed it was. The brass is for the 132nd FA, which came into theater too late to see action...I assumed it might have been a vet who was transferred over to them after the War for the return home? I'm open to thoughts...the name should lead somewhere too...

 

Dave

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Dave,

 

Great collection .... thanks for sharing.

 

The white wildcat designates the one hundred and sixty-first infantry.

 

Tim

 

thanks Tim!!! thumbsup.gif

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And guys...thanks again for all the compliments and comments. This is a great collecting field and I'm exceedingly happy... pretty much found my "niche"! One of the nicest things is that there is (for at least the time being) plenty of nice stuff to go around. I know I can (and have) quickly overspend myself buying "great" groupings...now time for more research!

 

Please feel free to post any/all comments questions about any of these uniforms. I'm no expert (I'm a newbie, in fact) so constructive comments are always appreciated.

 

Dave

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Gil-

 

I always thought it looked rooster-ish too, but it was sold to me as an oozlefinch so I assumed it was. The brass is for the 132nd FA, which came into theater too late to see action...I assumed it might have been a vet who was transferred over to them after the War for the return home? I'm open to thoughts...the name should lead somewhere too...

 

Dave

 

"Just for the halibut" (as my mother used to say) I Googled the term "Oozlefinch" -- found a history going back to the turn of the century Coast Artillery Corps. It mentioned that the three COAST Artillery Regiments that were part of the Railway Artillery Reserve were the 42nd, 43rd and 52nd, so something isn't right here.

 

I would suspect that the 132nd FA would have been a divisional level unit -- probably 75MM -- I am guessing with the 35th or 36th Division. (I know the 135th was with the 37th Div. and NG Arty units were consecutively numbered for the most part by div.)

 

Right now I think we have a contradiction here.

 

G

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I would suspect that the 132nd FA would have been a divisional level unit -- probably 75MM -- I am guessing with the 35th or 36th Division. (I know the 135th was with the 37th Div. and NG Arty units were consecutively numbered for the most part by div.)

 

Gil-

 

The 132nd FA was a "T-patcher" unit with the 36th, so you are correct.

 

Not sure if this can help much, but...also, the uniform is dated 1919 on the tailor's label. Since most "double patch" uniforms were worn post-War on discharge anyway, perhaps he could have been CAC earlier? But then again, that wouldn't explain why he was wounded (or how). Too bad he isn't from Ohio with good records...

 

Dave

GallingerER2.jpg

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I always thought it looked rooster-ish too, but it was sold to me as an oozlefinch so I assumed it was. The brass is for the 132nd FA, which came into theater too late to see action...I assumed it might have been a vet who was transferred over to them after the War for the return home? I'm open to thoughts...the name should lead somewhere too...

 

Dave,

 

It is an Oozlefinch, or at least a pelican. This very scarce insignia is for "First Army Railway Artillery". The other unit besides the Railway Artillery Reserve that used an Oozlefinch (or variation thereof).

 

In this particular case, it is 132 Company, Coast Artillery, a component of the 32 Coast Artillery Brigade. Nearly all WW1 coast artillery companies retained their company designations even when absorbed into larger units.

 

In the case of Coast Artillery units, a number in the apex below crossed cannons (set high upon the disk) equates to Coast Artillery. Field Artillery would have the crossed cannons set lower, and the regimental number would be in the upper apex. The crossed cannons with superimposed shell worn by Coast Artillery Officers was not adopted for enlisted men until late 1918.

 

The 32 Coast Artillery Brigade fired 9.2" howitzers on railway mounts. They did see action, so it is not unusual for your doughboy to have been wounded.

 

Chris

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Dave,

 

It is an Oozlefinch, or at least a pelican. This very scarce insignia is for "First Army Railway Artillery". The other unit besides the Railway Artillery Reserve that used an Oozlefinch (or variation thereof).

 

In this particular case, it is 132 Company, Coast Artillery, a component of the 32 Coast Artillery Brigade. Nearly all WW1 coast artillery companies retained their company designations even when absorbed into larger units.

 

In the case of Coast Artillery units, a number in the apex below crossed cannons (set high upon the disk) equates to Coast Artillery. Field Artillery would have the crossed cannons set lower, and the regimental number would be in the upper apex. The crossed cannons with superimposed shell worn by Coast Artillery Officers was not adopted for enlisted men until late 1918.

 

The 32 Coast Artillery Brigade fired 9.2" howitzers on railway mounts. They did see action, so it is not unusual for your doughboy to have been wounded.

 

Chris

 

Chris, that makes sense. I was seeing the "rooster" as having a tail to the left with an indistinct head to the right. I now see the eye on the left. My apoligies to all. I had never heard of 1st Army Railway Artillery. (My step grandfather was with the 64th CAC -- they fired 8"ers, but not from RR cars. Never saw action either.)

 

G

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Dave,

 

It is an Oozlefinch, or at least a pelican. This very scarce insignia is for "First Army Railway Artillery". The other unit besides the Railway Artillery Reserve that used an Oozlefinch (or variation thereof).

 

In this particular case, it is 132 Company, Coast Artillery, a component of the 32 Coast Artillery Brigade. Nearly all WW1 coast artillery companies retained their company designations even when absorbed into larger units.

 

In the case of Coast Artillery units, a number in the apex below crossed cannons (set high upon the disk) equates to Coast Artillery. Field Artillery would have the crossed cannons set lower, and the regimental number would be in the upper apex. The crossed cannons with superimposed shell worn by Coast Artillery Officers was not adopted for enlisted men until late 1918.

 

The 32 Coast Artillery Brigade fired 9.2" howitzers on railway mounts. They did see action, so it is not unusual for your doughboy to have been wounded.

 

Chris

 

Chris-

 

I'll be darned! Thank you! I'll print out this post and keep it with the uniform...one more piece of research for it!

 

Thanks!

 

Dave

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And you thought I was done posting... :lol:

 

This next uniform belonged to Major James B. Frazier, who was best known as serving as the US Representative for the 3rd District of the great state of Tennessee from 1949 to 1963. Prior to that, he served as the US District Attorney for the Eastern District of Tennessee from 1933 to 1948. Quite an impressive resume! I don't know if he made it overseas during WW1, though I'm trying to find out.

Frazier.jpg

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This group belonged to Captain Ray T. Miller, who served with the 135th Machine Gun Company, 37th Division. As with most, research continues...

MillerRT.jpg

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This group is one of my favorites...it belonged to Wagoneer Charles C. Light of the 26th Division. He was wounded TWICE during the War. Not unheard of, but certainly uncommon! He was from New York...I've tried researching him, but am still running into the problem of having TOO MANY results...Ouch!

LightCC.jpg

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Sorry for posting more boring uniforms, but someone might find the following ones interesting...

 

This group belonged to George Evans from Canton, Ohio, who served in Company G, 332nd Infantry Regiment. He joined in September 1917 and was discharged in May 1919 at the rank of 1st Sergeant!

Evans.jpg

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And another one with the boring red patch...

 

This one belonged to Elmer L. Thompson, who served in Company L, 332nd Infantry Regiment

ThompsonEL.jpg

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I know you're complaining, but here's another...

 

This one belonged to Alfred Heimann from Massillon, Ohio. He was the Supply Sergeant for Company I. Interesting are his issue journals - all the stuff he issued out to each member of his company, with them signing for it! Also fascinating is his diary covering the time from his induction to arrival in Italy!

HeimannA.jpg

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So I admit that I own at least one unnamed uniform. It happens...I know. Anyway, this was a triple patch 332nd that I just couldn't pass up. Could you???? ;)

TriplePatch.jpg

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