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Distinguished Service Cross...Neck Suspension?


IMPERIAL QUEST

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IMPERIAL QUEST

http://www.army.mil/-news/2007/11/02/5921-...-service-cross/

 

The above link features an article on a young Lt. awarded the DSC. My question is why have they pinned it to a makeshift blue ribbon and suspended it from his neck. Does this not directly contradict the regulations for the wearing of the DSC?

 

When I was in Kuwait, myself and several others were decorated with a medal that was suspended by a 1/4 in binder clip - it was fastened to the pocket flap instead of pinning it using the existing fastening device provided on the medal. Why is this practiced so widely these days? To me, it takes away from the moment of award - how long could it take the fasten a pin...geeeeshhh. thumbdown.gif

 

 

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yeah....I saw this pic and wondered about it as well. I haven't heard of any changes to the regs which supports this....but ya never know.....right? I hope it was just an ill-conceived matter of expediency. The MOH is our neck-ribbon award and should stay that way. Anyone have the scoop?

Semper Fi.....Bobgee

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I think the whole awards system is flawed now days anyways. Seems like it goes more on rank than on action. I also agree about the binder clip thing too. Almost all of my awards were binder clipped and then I had to return the dang medal afterwards besides for just a few. The ones I got in country I got to keep but the stateside ones I had to give back. When I was awarded my CIB I didn't even know it, I just happened to read it on my OMPF file one day by chance. I knew I was put in for it but being a bastard unit attached to the Third Infantry Division, we were last in line when it came to getting those awards processed.

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Bob,

 

Must be an "Army" thing!!!

 

Bill

 

 

yeah....I saw this pic and wondered about it as well. I haven't heard of any changes to the regs which supports this....but ya never know.....right? I hope it was just an ill-conceived matter of expediency. The MOH is our neck-ribbon award and should stay that way. Anyone have the scoop?

Semper Fi.....Bobgee

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Nope, it's a lazy thing.

 

There are devices made for exactly this purpose, so the fumble-fingered presenter doesn't drive the pin into the recipient's chest, but these clowns went a step further. By doing so, they showed a remarkable amount of disrespect for the award and the lieutenant.

 

I'm "old school" on this subject. I've seen the impact of well-done awards and sloppily-done awards and I strongly believe that these ceremonies should be simple, dignified and centered on the recipient. And that is regardless of the rank of the recipient or precedence of the award.

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IMPERIAL QUEST
... By doing so, they showed a remarkable amount of disrespect for the award and the lieutenant.

 

I'm "old school" on this subject. I've seen the impact of well-done awards and sloppily-done awards and I strongly believe that these ceremonies should be simple, dignified and centered on the recipient. And that is regardless of the rank of the recipient or precedence of the award.

 

Agree 100%. The actual "pinning" of the medal used to be when Generals like MacArthur, and Patton would offer accolades to the recepient as the decoration was proudly affixed squarely upon their chest. The moment was both personal and reverent in nsture. Now, the "ceremonies" are more like an assembly line operation.

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Yes, the blue ribbon around the neck for the DSC is embarrasing. Why doesn't the mighty Medal of Honor Association go and take issue with this???????? They're the ones who fought to make it illegal to collect MOHs and won... might as well take on a new crusade...

 

Okay, off my soap box!

 

With regard to the binder clips on medals, that's pretty much the norm nowadays. It does make it a heck of a lot easier to put the medals on the recipient, and that way the "pinner" doesn't have to fumble with a pin, exactly as stated above. It also makes it easier to put it anywhere on a uniform as well - instead of someplace that might be unpinnable. This is particularly true when pinning females...no commander in his right mind is going to pin a medal directly on the breast of a female soldier/sailor for fear of some harrassment/assault charge. Sad, but true.

 

Dave

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We use the binder clip method in my current unit for the same reasons Dave so eloquently indicated in his post. It was used in just about every unit I've been in the last two decades, except for the Berlin Brigade which had special device made specifically for this purpose. If done properly it doesn't detract from the occasion and keeps the General or Colonel from looking foolish by fumbling with the pin.

 

In many cases not receiving the medal is a function of Army regulation. If you have previous received that award you only receive an oak leaf cluster for additional awards. our SGM maintains MSMs, ARCOMs and AAMs specifically for this purpose of presentation but ensures he get's them back after the ceremony.

 

I earned an ARCOM for disaster assistance but didn't know it until a year later when I saw it in my OPMF on microfiche (yes I'm dating myself).

 

Kevin

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our SGM maintains MSMs, ARCOMs and AAMs specifically for this purpose of presentation but ensures he get's them back after the ceremony.

 

Our admin office keeps a stock of COMs and NAMs for issue (we don't give out MSMs save for once every 18 months). In addition to turning in the medals, our awardees have to turn in their award document folders as well.

 

I would never admit to walking into the admin office and trying on their entire stock of NAMs for kicks one day... w00t.gif (I can get away with a lot, it's true.) ;)

 

You might think it's horrible, and that we're destroying the award system. No, it's a matter of money. At one point about six months ago, we didn't have enough money to buy the certificates to print out more NAMs! ($25 a pack of 100, BTW) True story...

 

Dave

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I can understand that, and I did when they said that they did not have any arcoms to give out until a few months later when I was helping out my unit clear out the supply room and I found boxes upon boxes of dust coverd arcoms, so I naturally did what any good infantryman would do, I strategicly relocated an arcom to my pocket and went about my business directing the movement of supplies out of the building.

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Some things never change. I remember 20+ years ago folks complaining about the awards system and how awards were more based on rank than performance. My battalion commander, who had been a decorated Infantry company commander in Vietnam, stopped wearing his CIB after hearing that they were being given out like candy after the Grenada invasion in 83.

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Our company (sorry, I ment Brigade) gave all e-6 and above bronze stars for Iraq on our first rotation reguardless of performance. There will always be people that deserve awards not get them and people that do not deserve awards who get them but things like that I do not agree with.

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IMPERIAL QUEST
Our company (sorry, I ment Brigade) gave all e-6 and above bronze stars for Iraq on our first rotation reguardless of performance. There will always be people that deserve awards not get them and people that do not deserve awards who get them but things like that I do not agree with.

 

 

I know the feeling...really, I do. When my unit was deployed to the Middle East my wife was having medical complications after her pregnancy and she was considered a high risk case. Her doctor (Army doctor) wrote a letter and handed it to me to give to my Company Commander. It stated that I was "Non-deployable" and should remain at the rear. I would not hear of it, and in fact never gave the letter to my CO. I sent the wife back home to her parents, and only after I arrived overseas did I inform my CO...just in case.

 

Another fellow left from overseas after only two weeks in theatre because a family member died...before he left, he received an ARCOM. I stayed my full term, performed my duty and got well...nothing. thumbdown.gif

 

 

 

Anyhow, about the subject here, I would think that someone who attains the rank of General could manage to tough out the difficult task of pinning the second highest award for valor on this LT., but that is me living in my perfect little world. ermm.gif

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Did anyone notice the giant MOHs in the background? An odd background to the sick display of gawdiness and laziness in forefront. What's next? A royal sash for the National Defense Medal? HA!

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Did anyone notice the giant MOHs in the background? An odd background to the sick display of gawdiness and laziness in forefront. What's next? A royal sash for the National Defense Medal? HA!

 

Maybe we can get a neck ribbon for the Army Service Ribbon as well so all the new privates dont feel left out :)

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Maybe a little perspective, but hear is the WWII version of laziness: This DFC was awarded stateside to a noseturret gunner in the 14th AF by a very overweight Colonel. If you look closely over the regular pin there is a wire that runs the length of the pin and each end is pointed down to push into the coat instead of having to work the pin. Just goes to show that laziness in awards is not an entirely new thing... just perhaps a little more widespread! ;)

 

post-537-1196306166.jpg

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I seem to recall that as more female soldiers joined the ranks in the 1970's, there was some concern on how to award decorations. If I remember correctly they were often just handed to the female soldier to avoid an embarassing slip of the hand, while male soldiers still had theirs pinned on.

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collectsmedals

While I agree that the Medal of Honor should remain the only gallantry medal on a neck ribbon the Distinguished Service Cross is not exactly small potatoes. Whatever this officer did it was way beyond a Bronze Star and the honor given him for his valor is in no way diminished by the way the medal was presented.

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While I agree that the Medal of Honor should remain the only gallantry medal on a neck ribbon the Distinguished Service Cross is not exactly small potatoes. Whatever this officer did it was way beyond a Bronze Star and the honor given him for his valor is in no way diminished by the way the medal was presented.

 

I agree. My only point was that when you put lesser medals, EVEN the Distinguished Service Cross on the level with the Medal of Honor, by presenting it on a neck ribbon...it sort of diminishes the MOH.

 

AND...the DSC being our nations 2nd Highest award for combat valor has been just fine as a chest medal since World War I, and putting it on a big gawdy Freemason/Knights of Columbus style neck sash like that sord of diminishes the honor of the DSC as well.

 

The Lt. is obviously a hero, and definitely distinguished himself on the battlefield more than nearly every other soldier, Marine, or sailor, and this is not to attack his character. He deserved better. Unless he specifically requested to have the medal presented to him in this manner for some reason, it's a bit silly-looking and unprofessional to do it this way.

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I read that in order to address the criticism of the sometimes unfairness of Bronze Star awards, the army's new policy was to award them for 12 months service (I'm speaking of Iraq/Afghanistan obviously) in the case of E-6 and above, and ARCOM's for those below E-6. I guess this actually made it worse.

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While I can see why the Army would do this there are a lot of undeserving people in those ranks getting that award. I had to rotate out into an S-1 section for a few months once and the Battle Captain there was awarded the Bronze Star and I never once saw him do anything other than sit at his desk and eat candy, drink mountain dew, and get fat. Not once did he do ANYTHING. The NCO's in that section did it all for him (including knowing what needed to be done as he was on branch detail) and he received a Bronze Star for it. Things like that are why it is flawed I feel.

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  • 1 year later...

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