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I HATE MY NAME!!!


Wharfmaster

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When I was a little boy my Dad had a boss named V.D. Butts. Mr. Butts had a very attractive daughter named Cherry. I always felt sorry for her. :)

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Coolest name I ever heard was that of a fellow I knew from work named "Dirk Axe." If he ever Googles his name and he finds this post, he is going to go nuts trying to figure out who I could be! :lol:

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I too knew a Sergeant Major. He was a buck sergeant E-5 with a last name of Major. To make it even more confusing, he worked in the S-1 section at battalion headquarters, and one of his jobs was to answer the phone: "S-1, 3rd Battalion, 39th Infantry, this line is not secure, Sergeant Major speaking, sir!"

 

An Air Force buddy of my father's was named Tom Rump. Tom married a woman named Rosalind who of course, went by Rosie. Rosie Rump.

 

I also knew a Drill Sergeant with the last name of Smoker. Drill Sergeant Smoker - how would you like to be a recruit assigned to his platoon? He was a BIG guy, too!

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I used to share in a lot of teasing at school and still at work with my last name of Pugh ( pronounced pew) but I do feel bad for my WWI 26th Division group. Last name was Kuntz. I wonder with a last name like that he would have gotten a lot of guff or is that more of a modern thing.

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I served with a pair of officers named Major. At one time, they were both Captain Major until the husband was promoted to Major. Major Major and Capatin Major. That was hilarious.

 

I was an ROTC cadet with a kid named Annis, but he was always called Anus.

 

When I was working with the AIT companies as a Lt at Aberdeen Proving Grounds, Maryland, we had a Drill Sereant named Stone.. No big deal right? It wasn't until we noticed that one of his charges was a Private Stonebreaker. That dude got smoked all of the time!

 

Not military related- but I recall a photo of the bench at a football game with the players Dingle and Berry sitting next to each other. I was told by an alum of the university that they caught so much grief over that photo that they made a point of not sitting near each other ever again.

 

Allan

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WEIRD NAMES--- WHEN I WORKED A GM ASSEMBLY LINE WE HAD A GUY NAMED "LE COCK", HIS REAL LAST NAME AND POOR TOMMY WENT THROUGH HELL!!

MY CARDIOLOGIST-- HIS LAST NAME IS COCKE! WITH AN E AT THE END. HE MUST HAVE BEEN RIBBED ALL HIS LIFE ON IT. :w00t:

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I served with a pair of officers named Major. At one time, they were both Captain Major until the husband was promoted to Major. Major Major and Capatin Major. That was hilarious.

 

I was an ROTC cadet with a kid named Annis, but he was always called Anus.

 

When I was working with the AIT companies as a Lt at Aberdeen Proving Grounds, Maryland, we had a Drill Sereant named Stone.. No big deal right? It wasn't until we noticed that one of his charges was a Private Stonebreaker. That dude got smoked all of the time!

 

Not military related- but I recall a photo of the bench at a football game with the players Dingle and Berry sitting next to each other. I was told by an alum of the university that they caught so much grief over that photo that they made a point of not sitting near each other ever again.

 

Allan[/quote

 

Goofed, sorry Allan.

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I too knew a Sergeant Major. He was a buck sergeant E-5 with a last name of Major. To make it even more confusing, he worked in the S-1 section at battalion headquarters, and one of his jobs was to answer the phone: "S-1, 3rd Battalion, 39th Infantry, this line is not secure, Sergeant Major speaking, sir!"

 

An Air Force buddy of my father's was named Tom Rump. Tom married a woman named Rosalind who of course, went by Rosie. Rosie Rump.

 

I also knew a Drill Sergeant with the last name of Smoker. Drill Sergeant Smoker - how would you like to be a recruit assigned to his platoon? He was a BIG guy, too!

 

I guess all of us who served at one time or another ran into a fellow seviceman with the surname Major. My "MAJOR" acquantince, Sgt Major, a young black nco E-5 type with about 5 to 6 years of service, it was he who greeted us the very first morning of our military service at the FT Jackson reception station in the customary way of quietly sneaking into the squad bay and launching a galvanised metal garbage can into the air proceeded by the yelling and screaming out instructions, you know the ones. It was Sergeant Major who for the next 5 days all by himself taught our platoon how to march and the evolutions that go along with it, how to sing, the regulations of the Army, the customs of the Army, et all. Sergeant major was an ex 11 charlie, and stated that as our whole platoon was 11 series training bound that there will be no slack, NO SLACK was our cry when coming to attention for the next 4 days, this sergeant Major made you feel proud and glade you enlisted.

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Friend of mine joined the Air Force in the 70s. Named Ronald Macdonald. He said the first time he fell in at Lackland, the sergeant calling the roll hesitated when he came to his name, finally called it in that incredulous voice all instructors seem to have mastered. It was downhill from there.

Steve

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Over the years I have seen medals and groups to men with very unfortunate surnames. The type that causes endless kidding. Some so bad that they had to change their name. This can make research on a person difficult.

 

One example in my collection is a pre-war Navy Good Conduct to a man with the last name HEAD. As we know, the "Head" is the toilet aboard ship. You can guess how much crap this guy had to take from his fellow sailors. (pun intended).

 

Do you have a medal in your collection to a man with a very unfortunate name?

 

Regards,

 

The Wharfmaster

In Peace and War. US Merchant Marine.

 

Chew on this. good stuff.

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I served with a pair of officers named Major. At one time, they were both Captain Major until the husband was promoted to Major. Major Major and Capatin Major. That was hilarious.

 

I was an ROTC cadet with a kid named Annis, but he was always called Anus.

 

When I was working with the AIT companies as a Lt at Aberdeen Proving Grounds, Maryland, we had a Drill Sereant named Stone.. No big deal right? It wasn't until we noticed that one of his charges was a Private Stonebreaker. That dude got smoked all of the time!

 

Not military related- but I recall a photo of the bench at a football game with the players Dingle and Berry sitting next to each other. I was told by an alum of the university that they caught so much grief over that photo that they made a point of not sitting near each other ever again.

 

Allan[/quote

 

 

Goofed, I posted under the wrong quote, sorry Allan. Great stories though especialy the one about the football players.

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Over the years I have seen medals and groups to men with very unfortunate surnames. The type that causes endless kidding. Some so bad that they had to change their name. This can make research on a person difficult.

 

One example in my collection is a pre-war Navy Good Conduct to a man with the last name HEAD. As we know, the "Head" is the toilet aboard ship. You can guess how much crap this guy had to take from his fellow sailors. (pun intended).

 

Do you have a medal in your collection to a man with a very unfortunate name?

 

Regards,

 

The Wharfmaster

In Peace and War. US Merchant Marine.

 

This from the book MOTHER TONGUE [ ENGLISH AND HOW IT GOT THAT WAY ], two british officers both from the first world war, not american but certainly interresting. Quite a mouth full

 

1. ADMIRAL Sir Reginald Aylmer Ranfulry Plunkett-Ernel-Erle-Drax RN.

 

2. MAJOR Leone Sextus Denys Oswolf Fraudatifilius Tollemache-Tollemache de Orellana Plantagenet Tollemache-Tollemache. A 1902 sandhurst attendee and commisioned apparantly without graduating in 1903. Of the Leicestershire Regiment and Seconded in 1916 to the Australian Army as BRIGADE MAJOR 3rd AUSTRALIAN BRIGADE 1st AUSTRALIAN DIVISION, Died on the Western Front from illness 1917, his older brother Leo Quintus Tollemache-Tollemache de Orellana Plantagenet (Less names than his younger brother ) also served in France, in the 1st Battalion of the Lincolnshire Regiment. He went missing, presumed killed, on 1 November 1914 and his body was never found. He is commemorated on the Menin Gate memorial.

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[not military but...]

 

A brother-in-law of mine has a female cousin, her maiden name Aycock. She married a guy with last name Roach. She is now Aycock Roach (pronounce it "a cockroach").

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Several years ago, I also worked with two Richards who went by the nickname "Dick" (at two different locations). One had the last name "Root", the other "Driver". Both good guys, but imagine the comments you heard behind each as they walked away (pronounce "Dick" with each of those last names)!

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Oh dear God forgive me for posting. This man served with honor and I truly PRAY he did NOT receive too much kidding. But this Army GCM naming could have been the subject of much ribbing,

 

My best to all, and my heartfelt thank to Mr. Cox, who served his country, :salute:

 

Joe

 

post-48324-1320183317.jpg

 

 

Thanks Joe, may he rest in peace.

 

Best regards,

 

The Wharfmaster

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Several years ago, I also worked with two Richards who went by the nickname "Dick" (at two different locations). One had the last name "Root", the other "Driver". Both good guys, but imagine the comments you heard behind each as they walked away (pronounce "Dick" with each of those last names)!

 

I once worked with a Richard Head.....aka "Dick"

 

There was a family of girls in my high school (sisters) named Hoare. When the bus dropped them off all the guys would yell "All out for the Hoare House"

 

I think they all married early in life

 

Bill

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There was a family of girls in my high school (sisters) named Hoare. When the bus dropped them off all the guys would yell "All out for the Hoare House"

 

I think they all married early in life

 

Bill

This is the best one ! :w00t:

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This from the book MOTHER TONGUE [ ENGLISH AND HOW IT GOT THAT WAY ], two british officers both from the first world war, not american but certainly interresting. Quite a mouth full

 

1. ADMIRAL Sir Reginald Aylmer Ranfulry Plunkett-Ernel-Erle-Drax RN.

 

A USN admiral whose name I always found interesting was Felix Xerxes Gygax. That's a lot of X's for one guy's name! He was commandant of the Norfolk Navy Yard during WW2.

 

Justin B.

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I have a friend who severed in the Marines with me. His name was Rob Whigger.

 

No one ever believed it was his last name so he had to always show them his license.

 

And yes he was white. :)

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Too Much WW1 Militaria

Before I retired, I worked for a CPT Crunch. I avoided answering the phone whenever I was up at company, I couldn't say "CPT Crunch's office, how may I help you sir or ma'am" without laughing. And, they say we CW-4's are crusty! I used to hope he'd pick of MAJ his first look for his sake.

 

After I retired, I worked with a guy named Dick Lane. The bad part is that his wife's first name was Lois!

 

John

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VolunteerArmoury
In basic we had a guy with the last name of Sergeant. Private Sergeant was known as Private Private because the Drill Sergeants would not allow him to be addressed as Sergeant.

 

The guy in the bunk next to me in Infantry School was PFC Sergeant. Same thing called Private instead.

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VolunteerArmoury

Also one of my best friends, Morgan got commissioned from the ranks a few years ago and should be pinning Captain in about a year and a half. I had the honour of giving him his first salute & receiving a 1879 Morgan silver dollar from him ("Silver dollar salute") and as I walked pass him I slipped a mini of Capt Morgan with the Capt marked out & replaced with LT in his service dress coat pocket. I promised him when he "grew up to Captain" I'd buy him a bottle.

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Well my last name is Belcher. I'd get people who'd call me belch, or burp, or some variation of that. I always looked at them and said "Oh you're so smart cause I have never heard that one before!" They never made fun of it after that. :D

 

I served with a guy out in Cali his last name was Private, he was a Specialist when I knew him.

 

My wife (didn't know her at the time) was an MP in Hawaii and was on gate guard. A woman drove to the gate and provided my wife her ID. Her name was Fuk Mi. Yes, that's how it's prnounced. ;) My wife made her say it a couple times and her NCO standing near by did everything he could not to be rolling on the ground laughing.

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