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Bagel Station, Lebanon - Beirut Crisis 1983

 

Consequently, the USN began concentrating larger ships off the Lebanese coast, moving the carrier USS Eisenhower (CVN-69) from a station off Libya to a new station east of Cyprus, named “Bagel”. The carrier arrived accompanied with the helicopter carrier USS Iwo Jima (LPH-2), which had the troops of the 24th MEU aboard......

 

.....Meanwhile, the Americans continued their efforts to reinforce the Lebanese Army, supplying it even with a number of M-48 Patton MBTs, and supporting its operations by heavy artillery, in turn making the Lebanese Muslims – and their Iranian and Syrian supporters – even more nervous. Nevertheless, it still came as a terrible surprise when the MNF-troops were hit by a new form of warfare: on 23 October 1983 a suicide-bomber drove a truck filled with explosives into the headquarters of the US Marine compound in Beirut and detonated his murderous load. The terrible explosion completely obliterated the building, killing 241 US troops in the process. Only few seconds later a similar vehicle hit the Headquarters of the French troops in Beirut, killing 58. The MNF troops did not properly recover from these blows, when in another similar assault against an Israeli security post in Tyre, on 4 November 1983, 23 Israeli troops were killed as well.

The USA seems not to have had a clear idea how and against who to react at the time, but the French felt it was time for another air raid against one of Druze or Syrian positions. On 17 November 1983 ten Super Etendards bombarded carefully selected bases of the Shi’ia Militia and the Iranians in the Balbek, while four hit the main base of the Jihad-al-Islami – the organization that took the responsibility for bombings of US and French headquarters – with napalm bombs. The French fighter-pilots were confronted by a considerable amount of flak and several SA-7s and their attack was not especially precise, most of their bombs landing in the nearby vineyards. The Shi’ia losses were nevertheless heavy. In the following days the USN reinforced its units off Lebanon, by deploying the carrier USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) and her combat group to the Bagel Station.

 

Bagel Station 001.jpg

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CRACKDOWN STATION - 1990 USS JOHN F. KENNEDY (CV-67) Patrol in Paradise VICE 1

 

In 1990 the Kennedy was assigned to operations supporting the war on drugs and sent to the Caribbean to establish Crackdown Station where the Gulf of Mexico meets the Caribbean Sea

Crackdown Station USS JFK 1990 001.jpg

Crackdown Station USS JFK 1990 002.jpg

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CRACKDOWN STATION - 1990 USS JOHN F. KENNEDY (CV-67) Patrol in Paradise VICE 1



In 1990 the Kennedy was assigned to operations supporting the war on drugs and sent to the Caribbean to establish Crackdown Station where the Gulf of Mexico meets the Caribbean Sea


Crackdown Station USS JFK 1990 003.jpg

Crackdown Station USS JFK 1990 004.jpg

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Who owns the South China Sea?

 

NINE DASH LINE YACHT CLUB - USS JOHN STENNIS (CVN-74) BATTLE GROUP 2010

 

The South China Sea encompasses several hundred small islands, reefs, and atolls, almost all uninhabited and uninhabitable, within a 1.4 million square mile area. The PRC inherited from the former Kuomintang government of China the nine-dash line, which draws a line around all of these islands, asserts sovereignty over all of them, and makes ambiguous claims about rights to waters within the line. Under the U.N. Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS), negotiated in the 1970s and 1980s, countries can claim exclusive rights to the fish and mineral resources within Exclusive Economic Zones, which can extend 200 nautical miles from a continental shore line or around islands that can support habitation. There is no provision in the convention granting rights to waters, such as in the South China Sea, without regard to land-based sovereign rights. So it has long been implicit in the U.S. interpretation of UNCLOS that claims to the mineral and fish resources of the South China Sea, unless they are linked to specific inhabitable islands, are invalid.

 

In a highly anticipated July 2016 ruling, a Hague-based international tribunal found that Beijing's so-called nine-dash line of its territorial claims in the South China Sea had no legal basis. The tribunal also ruled on Tuesday that Beijing had violated international law by "causing severe harm to the coral reef environment."
The Permanent Court of Arbitration issued a 500-page unanimous ruling in Republic of Philippines v. People's Republic of China, a case brought by the Philippines in 2013. Manila's 15-point case critically asked the tribunal to rule on the status of China's nine-dash line, a boundary that is the basis for its 69-year-old claim to roughly 85% of the South China Sea. Territorial claims from Vietnam, Malaysia, Indonesia, Brunei, the Philippines, Taiwan, and China make the South China Sea one of the most disputed places on the planet.
China, which claims the lion's share of the region, has boycotted prior hearings. Foreign Ministry spokesman Lu Kang told reporters ahead of the ruling, "We won't accept any" of the court's "so-called materials, no matter what they are."
"No matter what kind of ruling is to be made, Chinese armed forces will firmly safeguard national sovereignty, security, and maritime interests and rights, firmly uphold regional peace and stability, and deal with all kinds of threats and challenges," China's Defense Ministry said in a statement.

 

9 Dash Line Yacht Club CVN 74 USS JOHN STENNIS 001.jpg

9 Dash Line Yacht Club CVN 74 USS JOHN STENNIS 002.jpg

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MEDITERRANEAN YACHT CLUB - USS SARATOGA (CV-60) with CVW-17 embarked 1992

 

USS Saratoga (CV60) & CVW-17 Mediterranean Cruise Book 1992 https://www.navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv60-92/index.html

 

This was her last cruise prior to decommissioning. There was also an unfortunate friendly fire incident on this cruise when SARATOGA fired two live Sea Sparrow missiles at the Turkish destroyer minelayer TCG Muavenet, former USS GWIN (DM-33)

 

During an exercise planning session on 1 October 1992, the Battle Group commander, Rear Admiral Philip Dur, ordered that a simulated attack on nearby opposition forces use Sea Sparrow missiles. Sea Sparrow missiles, an anti-aircraft defensive system, was not part of existing doctrine for fighting surface targets and had not been used before, either in exercises or in live combat operations against surface targets. The order was accepted by the Operations staff with the notation that the missile system would be "simulated" (meaning the missile stations would be unmanned). Just prior to midnight on 2 October 1992, when the exercise was scheduled to begin, Rear Admiral Dur asked whether the Sea Sparrows were ready to go for the exercise. He was told that the use of the missiles was going to be simulated for this exercise. Rear Admiral Dur then directed that the use of the Sea Sparrows was not to be simulated and that the missile team was to be on station for the exercise.
Without providing prior notice of the exercise, officers on Saratoga woke the enlisted Sea Sparrow missile team and directed them to conduct the simulated attack. According to U.S. Navy, certain members of the missile firing team were not told that the exercise was a simulation drill, rather than an actual firing event.
As the drill progressed, the missile system operator used language to indicate he was preparing to fire a live missile, but due to the absence of standard terminology, the supervisors failed to appreciate the significance of the terms used and the requests made. Specifically, the Target Acquisition System operator issued the command "arm and tune", terminology the console operators understood to require arming of the missiles in preparation for actual firing. The officers supervising the drill did not realize that "arm and tune" signified a live firing and ignored two separate requests from the missile system operator to clarify whether the launch order was an exercise. As a result, shortly after midnight on the morning of 2 October, Saratoga fired two Sea Sparrow missiles at Muavenet. The first missile struck in the bridge, destroying it and the Combat Information Center. The second missile struck in the aft magazine but did not detonate. The explosion and resulting fires killed five of the ship's officers and injured 22. Nearby US Navy ships responded in aid to the Turkish ship which was now without leadership. Fire and rescue teams boarded the ship and put out the fires in the bridge and the aft magazine preventing any secondary explosions.
The sailors who actually fired the missiles were not punished, but the ship's commanding officer, Captain James M. Drager, four officers and three enlisted men received admiral's non-judicial punishment, an action which effectively ended their US Navy careers.
USS Capodanno was given to Turkey by the United States Navy as part of the restitution for the accident and the vessel was renamed TCG Muavenet (F-250).

 

Mediterranean Yacht Club 1992 USS SARATOGA (CV-60) CVW 17 001.jpg

Mediterranean Yacht Club 1992 USS SARATOGA (CV-60) CVW 17 002.jpg

muavenett  003.jpg

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Western Mediterranean Country Club Med '75 - Locations at Rota, Signonella, Brindisi, Naples - Cold War

 

From a VA-176 Thunderbolts Ace Novelty set - I have no doubt that although this one is not tagged it's an Ace Novelty as it came with several other patches from the same Intruder veteran

 

VA 176 Ace Novelty Set 009a.jpg

VA 176 Ace Novelty Set 010a.jpg

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