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128th ARMOURED ORDNANCE BATTALION


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It is with a geat deal of pride and personal affection that I take this opportunity to greet you, the officers and men of the Ordnance Service. I find it difficult, however, to congratulate you on the job you have done, for, to me, no amount of praise can properly describe your great achievements. Ordnance has always been short on words and long on hard work, and what you have done to smash the forces of aggression in Europe more than proves this fact. Suffice it to say that the miracles of supply and maintenance in the battles of Western Europe constitute one of the proudest chapters in the story of the war. This war is not yet over. Ordnance will continue to maintain the standards you set here -- until the enemy in the Pacific is smashed. When this task is done and total peace comes, I know you will equal your feats as soldiers to build a greater America.

 

H. B. Sayler

Major General,

Chief Ordnance Officer, ETO

 

128th ARMOURED ORDNANCE BATTALION

6th ARMOURED DIVISION

GERMANY 1945

 

The men and the units of the Ordnance Department are amongst the unsung heroes of the Infantry and Armoured Division to which they were attached. Often fighting as Infantrymen the men when not engaged in direct combat were keeping the Divisions or independent units vehicles moving and weapons firing.

 

Often the First Allied Airborne Association can be seen on the circuit representing the more elite US units and while we make no apologies for this, this association does appreciate what the less elite outfits contributed to the war effort. Now and again and especially to fit into a bigger Scenario we will adopt a combat support unit. For the Broadlands multi period event the FAAA decided to adopt again an Ordnance unit. This we have done a few times, but this time we would be basing our unit around an Armoured Division and in particular the 6th Armoured Division and the 86th Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron a unit we had done already this year.

 

The 128th Armoured Ordnance Battalion was often split up into sub units to support various main units within the Division. While sub units like the 86th Cav could deal with first line repairs often other repairs had to be passed on to the 128th Ord Battalion, instead of moving equipment back, the Ord Battalion came forward to assist often repairing vehicle and equipment under fire.

 

This event would see our newly trained Pyro and Safety Officer deploying as a member of the special effects team and this was another reason we decided to get involved and support this event at a very busy time for the group.

 

The scenario was late war, very late war in fact and we were into Germany during the final stages of WWII. This period is not represented nearly enough so it took little persuasion to gear up in M43 Jackets, wools and buckle boots for this event.

 

The advance party from the 128th consisting of an Armaments Platoon deployed on the Friday and arrived at the wooded copse around mid afternoon. Elements of the 86th Cav (LHA) were already in location and under canvas.

 

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The ORD troops who arrived by Jeep and Dodge WC51 quickly started to set up the workshop and by early evening were up and running and waited on the remainder of the platoon to arrive. By last light the last Soldier had reported into the Headquarters section and joined his platoon who were settling down for the night.

 

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The workshop and accomodation were fully established by last light. With a long day of equipment and weapons repair ahead of them the Platoon settled down for the night.

 

At first light while breakfast was cooking the detachment prepared defensive positions in the woodline, foxholes dug the troops took the opportunity to wash and shave, it would be the first time for many days.

 

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Cpl Greening supervises the digging of the defensive positions.

 

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T5 Macdonald when not playing base in a big band was a barber by trade, it was not long before he went to work.

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By midmorning equipment was already coming in to the workshop for repair, this included small arms, heavy support weapons and radio equipment.

 

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Radio equipment is inspected by T5 Macdonald

 

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Private Parker has his work inspected by the units armourer

 

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A Platoon Sgt from Troop C hands over sighting equipment to the Armaments Platoon Sgt for inspection

 

With the outfit now Co-located and in operation with Troop C, 86th Cav the Platoon Leader radios in his morning report to Headquarters 128th AOB .

 

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Our detachment was small, but large enough to represent just one element of the Battalion and the Ordnance Department on the front line. We deployed with a mixture of new guys and some Veteran group members, all worked hard to produce a convincing impression and we had a lot of fun doing it, especially our recently qualified Pyrotechnics NCO, it seems he at least had plenty to feel chuffed about.

 

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Report and pictures

 

LB, Unit Coordinator

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VERY nice! I'm especially happy to see U.S. reenactors that don't want to portray E Co, 506th PIR, 101st Airborne Division!

 

One nitpicky correction: The U.S. does not spell armor or armored with a "u." That is a Commonwealth thing.

 

Other than that, great job!

Collecting 3rd Armored Division items of all kinds from all eras, specializing in the 36th Armored Infantry Regiment.

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VERY nice! I'm especially happy to see U.S. reenactors that don't want to portray E Co, 506th PIR, 101st Airborne Division!
AMEN, brother! :thumbsup:
One nitpicky correction: The U.S. does not spell armor or armored with a "u." That is a Commonwealth thing.
I'm just happy he spelled Ordnance correctly as so many people think there's an 'I' in it!

Lee Bishop Formerly known as "Ratchet 5" with the 2nd Infantry Division (yes, in REAL life)

US WW2 War Correspondent collector

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I'm just happy he spelled Ordnance correctly as so many people think there's an 'I' in it!

 

Yeah, there oughta be an ordinance against misspelling ordnance.

Collecting 3rd Armored Division items of all kinds from all eras, specializing in the 36th Armored Infantry Regiment.

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VERY nice! I'm especially happy to see U.S. reenactors that don't want to portray E Co, 506th PIR, 101st Airborne Division!

 

One nitpicky correction: The U.S. does not spell armor or armored with a "u." That is a Commonwealth thing.

 

Other than that, great job!

 

 

Cheers Steve

 

Thanks for the heads up, unfortunately while we share a common language some words I appreciate are presented slightly different. It is important when representing WWII American we at least get the basics correct, so apologies for this slip up.

 

Funny thing is I am always being pulled for not spelling Honor correctly when posting reports on UK Forum sites.

 

Regards

 

Lee

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VERY nice! I'm especially happy to see U.S. reenactors that don't want to portray E Co, 506th PIR, 101st Airborne Division!

 

One nitpicky correction: The U.S. does not spell armor or armored with a "u." That is a Commonwealth thing.

 

Other than that, great job!

 

 

Some of us Americans do spell it that way (mostly cause it annoys the heck out of my supervisors on reports). Also there are also four accepted and proper spellings for the word Sergeant.

Honorably Discharged OEF VI/VII Veteran

US Army Military Police

SGT

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  • 6 years later...

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