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How common was it to find Specialists that were infantrymen?

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In the 50s and 60s when Specialist 4-9 were still around, how common was it to find 11B's with a Specialist rank. I assume SP4's and SP5's were common, but what about Spec 6s and 7s. I know no solider ever made it to Spec 8 or 9, but I would think that finding an E-6 or E-7 that wasn't an NCO in the Infantry would be rare. Were radiomen condsidered 11Bs? I would understand them being Specialists since you don't really need NCO training to operate a radio.


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In the 50s and 60s when Specialist 4-9 were still around, how common was it to find 11B's with a Specialist rank. I assume SP4's and SP5's were common, but what about Spec 6s and 7s. I know no solider ever made it to Spec 8 or 9, but I would think that finding an E-6 or E-7 that wasn't an NCO in the Infantry would be rare. Were radiomen condsidered 11Bs? I would understand them being Specialists since you don't really need NCO training to operate a radio.

My father served in an infantry company in the 82nd Airborne Division in Vietnam in 1968 and 1968. He went over as a Sergeant. However, most of the infantrymen who arrived overseas were promoted to PFC their first day in-country. From what I have seen in his photos and awards orders, if they got a subsequent promotion in-country, which was pretty common, it was usually to Specialist 4 rather than Corporal. For some reason during Vietnam, the Army didn't promote too many men to Corporal. However, from what I can also tell, a further promotion to E-5 for an infantryman was usually to Sergeant rather than Specialist 5. I don't think I have ever seen any reference to an infantryman of any Specialist rank above Specialist 4. However, the higher Specialist ranks were more common for true specialists such as medics, helicopter crewmen,etc.

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In the 50s and 60s when Specialist 4-9 were still around, how common was it to find 11B's with a Specialist rank. I assume SP4's and SP5's were common, but what about Spec 6s and 7s. I know no solider ever made it to Spec 8 or 9, but I would think that finding an E-6 or E-7 that wasn't an NCO in the Infantry would be rare. Were radiomen condsidered 11Bs? I would understand them being Specialists since you don't really need NCO training to operate a radio.

 

As you probably know, until 1958 there were no such ranks as Sp4 thru Sp9. And as you state, there were never any Sp8s and 9s, and precious few Sp7s.

 

Sp4s and 5s were a different story. Sp4 infantrymen were as common as dirt, the rank being used in effect as 'PFC supremo.' When it comes to Sp5, my memory of my time in the infantry fails me--hopefully someone else will comment. I'd be dumbounded to hear of any Sp6s in a rifle company.

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As you probably know, until 1958 there were no such ranks as Sp4 thru Sp9. And as you state, there were never any Sp8s and 9s, and precious few Sp7s.

 

Sp4s and 5s were a different story. Sp4 infantrymen were as common as dirt, the rank being used in effect as 'PFC supremo.' When it comes to Sp5, my memory of my time in the infantry fails me--hopefully someone else will comment. I'd be dumbounded to hear of any Sp6s in a rifle company.

Infantry companies had very specific Tables Of Organization And Equipment. In terms of infantrymen, there would be one E-8 authorized as a first sergeant, three or four E-7's as platoon sergeants, three or four E-6's per platoon as squad leaders and two E-5's per squad as team leaders. On paper, all of these were leadership positions rating an NCO rank so they would be a First Sergeant, Sergeants First Class, Staff Sergeants and Buck Sergeants. In reality, and especially in a combat zone during the Vietnam era, it was not uncommon at all to finds soldiers acting in positions one or two pay grades higher than their own. My father was an E-5 Sergeant serving as a platoon sergeant which, again, would normally be filled by an E-7 Sergeant First Class. I have even heard of Spec. 4's serving temporarily as platoon sergeants when there was no one else available.

 

I don't think there would be any positions in an infantry company for a Specialist 5 or higher. Anyone who would be promoted to E-5 would be serving at least as a team leader and more likely a squad leader so he would by definition be an NCO and would be promoted to Sergeant.

 

I believe each infantry company would have a clerk and an armorer who might have an infantry MOS but would technically be non-combat troops who served in the company rear. Most that I have seen were Specialist 4's and I don't believe there would be any slots for an E-5 or higher in those positions. I think cooks were also assigned to each infantry company and they may have been a Spec. 5 or 6 or even 7, but they would not have an infantry MOS so technically they would not be infantrymen.

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... I think cooks were also assigned to each infantry company and they may have been a Spec. 5 or 6 or even 7, but they would not have an infantry MOS so technically they would not be infantrymen.

 

My experience was that by the time a cook made E6 he was an NCO. At one time mess sergeants were SSGs; I believe the position later became an E7 slot-and because it was primarily supervisory it was an SFC slot.

 

Consider the duties of a cook. Once they've mastered the skills to be an accomplished cook, there's no place to go from there and remain just a cook. No master pastry chefs SP6 or cordon bleu chef SP7. Further promotion would involve mess management on some level and would be a hard stripe slot.

 

And to split hairs, I'm not sure that cooks werent technically assigned to Bn and farmed out to the companies. Maybe someone could address that with more authority.

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My experience was that by the time a cook made E6 he was an NCO. At one time mess sergeants were SSGs; I believe the position later became an E7 slot-and because it was primarily supervisory it was an SFC slot.

 

Consider the duties of a cook. Once they've mastered the skills to be an accomplished cook, there's no place to go from there and remain just a cook. No master pastry chefs SP6 or cordon bleu chef SP7. Further promotion would involve mess management on some level and would be a hard stripe slot.

 

And to split hairs, I'm not sure that cooks werent technically assigned to Bn and farmed out to the companies. Maybe someone could address that with more authority.

 

My experience in the early 80s where a mix of two situations. The first was at Ft hood in the 2/12 cav,here the cooks where naturally assigned to headquarters, headquarters company but they all worked in a consolidated "dining facility", cooks from the adjacent 2/5 cav and one of the bn's of the 8th cav (I forgot which one ) also worked here as well. These cooks where not assigned to individual line companies and as far as I remember never left the battalion area, not even on our longer field problems. When one of our companies where out in the field the 2/12 cooks would make chow(Hot As) to be picked up by the company and trucked out to where ever we where,It was never flown out by bird as a bird ain't gonner land in the immdiate batt area.It would be the task of the respective battalions cooks to provide for there respective companies,budgets had to be observed you know.

 

At ft wainwright in the 4/9 Inf as I metioned several times here on the forum was like a stroll into the past,so many things where done here that had'nt changed since the 50s and 60s. One of which, was that cooks where assigned to individual line companies and did go out to the field with there assigned companies,this of course would be only on our longer field problems. In the fall of 1982 while on a lenghty one I drew KP,I never had this duty before,it was winter now and it was welcomed to get out of the line,here I seen for the first time our battalion trans.Our company mess tent was located with all the rest of battalion shops which where for the most part those hugh tents,I forget now the exact name of them,they where the ones with those tall thick hexagonal poles,it was quite a set up,field stoves and all I would doubt if those stoves where vintage 50s and 60s since a great many things that where used where older pieces of equipment.I here tell on Radio talk shows that not only has the army did away with KP but cooks as well,that its all contrators,say it ain't so joe.

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My experience was that by the time a cook made E6 he was an NCO. At one time mess sergeants were SSGs; I believe the position later became an E7 slot-and because it was primarily supervisory it was an SFC slot.

 

Consider the duties of a cook. Once they've mastered the skills to be an accomplished cook, there's no place to go from there and remain just a cook. No master pastry chefs SP6 or cordon bleu chef SP7. Further promotion would involve mess management on some level and would be a hard stripe slot.

 

And to split hairs, I'm not sure that cooks werent technically assigned to Bn and farmed out to the companies. Maybe someone could address that with more authority.

We did have a SP6 cook in my battery on Okinawa in 1970 and his specialty was baking. The mess sergeant was, if my memory serves me correctly, a SSG or SFC. I, myself, was one of those SP6's converted to SSG in about 1986 or 87.

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I can attest to the fact first hand as I was an 11b (1972-1973).

After I was in country (Vietnam) for about two months I was made a Spec-4 and again after three more months I was made an E-5.

The E-5 might have had something to do with my receiving the Purple Heart.

 

I do remember seeing several 11b Spec-4's

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I can attest to the fact first hand as I was an 11b (1972-1973).

After I was in country (Vietnam) for about two months I was made a Spec-4 and again after three more months I was made an E-5.

The E-5 might have had something to do with my receiving the Purple Heart.

 

I do remember seeing several 11b Spec-4's

 

I was myself a spec-4 11B and from the spring of 82 to my discharge in late 82 a squad RTO.Within the rifle platoons and weapons platoons all the RTOs are 11 series personel only.In AIT all 11 series trainees where given blocks of instruction on the PRC 77 and other field communication equiment such as the field phones.So it is expected that any rifleman or mortarman can and will be able to operate these pieces commo equipment at all times.RTOs for squads as well as the platoon leaders where taken from the most longest serving men within the platoons,and yes they where normally spec-4s but they also could be PFCs,the one thing that all had in common was that there was a comfortable fit for the squad leaders and platoon leaders and that they had a fine reputation within the unit IE no screw balls or problem children,this as well with the confidence that goes along with the officer and or NCOs belief that the man picked to this slot is more than capable of this most important position. Over in HQ platoon are radiomen where all Signal Corps personel,these guys would man the wide band radios and would also don PRC 77s and accompany the CO when ever he went up to the line,he had if I can remember 2 personal RTOs one for company level communication on platoon nets the other one for the battalion net. This was only in alaska as we where a straight leg unit,earlier at Ft Hood it was slightly differant as this was a mech unit,and as such the use of ACPs came into play,but on purly airmobile field problems the CO would have the same deal with HQ platoon RTOs at his side.

 

As I mentioned these guys where signal corps, but there where no doubt an 11B or 11C occasionaly assigned as a RTO on the company level HQ platoon, here he would be only a RTO as he would not no anything about operateing the large wide band radio sets and would not be trained in there use,he more than likley was also the company orderly and humped a radio when the situation demanded it. On the battalion even the brigade level all commo troops as far as I know would be exclusivly Signal Corps.In accuality being assigned to a grunt company even at the battalion level was not popular at all for these Signal corps troops,the Divisional Signal battalion or seperate signal battalions or companies being the choice and prefered assignment.

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During the early 90s, almost all E-4s regardless of MOS were Specialists. You had to be in a leadership slot to be a corporal. I tried to argue that as an assistant squad leader to an E-5 who was never around, I should be a corporal. Didn't work. :lol:


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:thumbsup: I was an Infantry corporal because I drove a Jeep for an Infantry Colonel in Saigon. I went to RVN as a slick sleeve Private (E-2) and was promoted to E-3 (PFC) the 1st day that I arrived. I drove for Colonel Phillips for six months (TDY) and the day before I left RVN, Phillips promoted me to Corporal.

 

I arrived in Germany as my Battalion was deploying to Greece/Turkey for a NATO Excersize. My assigned company had already departed, so I deployed with a bunch of support troops from the 24th Division HQ Company. This group consisted of Radio Operators and Aircraft Tower personnel. The were all specialists from SP5 to SP7.

 

I was assigned as the NCOIC because I was the only "Hard" stripe passenger on the flight.

 

The only SP5 that I ever knew in an Infantry company was SP5 Henry Aldana, who was the Senior Aidman assigned to B Company, 1/27 Infantry, 25th Infantry Division at Cu Chi, RVN in 1967-68.

 

Mike

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SFMike

 

F Company, 50th Infantry (LRRP)

 

A-361, 3rd Mobile Strike Force (B-36)

Company A, 5th Special Forces Group (ABN)

 

 

 

RIP Steven Collier, 1968

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The only SP5 that I ever knew in an Infantry company was SP5 Henry Aldana, who was the Senior Aidman assigned to B Company, 1/27 Infantry, 25th Infantry Division at Cu Chi, RVN in 1967-68.

Two points about that statement. First, medics aren't infantrymen obviously. But more importantly and maybe less well known is that medics, at least during Vietnam, were not assigned to the infantry companies they served. Actually, they were assigned to the Medical Platoon of Headquarters and Headquarters Company of the infantry battalion and attached to the various rifle companies as needed. Many would serve most if not all of their tour with the same same platoon of the same company but it was not uncommon for them to be shuffled around different platoons or even companies of the same battalion.

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Two points about that statement. First, medics aren't infantrymen obviously. But more importantly and maybe less well known is that medics, at least during Vietnam, were not assigned to the infantry companies they served. Actually, they were assigned to the Medical Platoon of Headquarters and Headquarters Company of the infantry battalion and attached to the various rifle companies as needed. Many would serve most if not all of their tour with the same same platoon of the same company but it was not uncommon for them to be shuffled around different platoons or even companies of the same battalion.

 

Quite true its was the same in the early 80s in the 2/12 cav at Ft Hood the medic's where from headquarters, Headquarters company, interestingly They never seemed to go out in the field, I,am telling you true I never really remember seeing one. later in the 4/9 Inf in alaska, it was differant, here the medics would allways be out with us no matter the lenght of the problem AND it was allways the same medic. I can remember him by name, I can not say the same during my earlier assignment in the Cav. This medic a Spec 4 missed only one field problem, his place was taken by another medic HQ Co, this one was a Spec 5, also there was on staff in the battalion medical room, (you know where you would report for sick call) a spec 6, he must have been an advanced Specialist/Technican in a MOS other than 91B, if I can recall our Battalion Medical Officer was not an officer, but rather a Warrent Officer a senior one like CWO 3 or even a CWO 4.

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I here tell on Radio talk shows that not only has the army did away with KP but cooks as well,that its all contrators,say it ain't so joe.

 

You're correct. There are Food Service personnel which I was recently corrected to when I mentioned the term "cook" to a guy in my company. The only Food Service folks I met in Iraq earlier this year in OND & previously in OIF were there to supervise the TCNs that were cooking for us. TCNs are "Third Country Nationals" on Joint Base Balad/Anaconda they were mostly Indian or Sri Lankan so we had a lot of curry. We did pull KP when I first enlisted in the mid 90s but not sure when soldiers performed KP ceased for when I was in a Drill Sgt slot none of my recruits had to pull it. The hospital here on Ft. Gordon has a handful of green suit food service folks. A closed chapter of Army culture.


Be well,

 

Chad C. Rogers

Retired Army

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You're correct. There are Food Service personnel which I was recently corrected to when I mentioned the term "cook" to a guy in my company. The only Food Service folks I met in Iraq earlier this year in OND & previously in OIF were there to supervise the TCNs that were cooking for us. TCNs are "Third Country Nationals" on Joint Base Balad/Anaconda they were mostly Indian or Sri Lankan so we had a lot of curry. We did pull KP when I first enlisted in the mid 90s but not sure when soldiers performed KP ceased for when I was in a Drill Sgt slot none of my recruits had to pull it. The hospital here on Ft. Gordon has a handful of green suit food service folks. A closed chapter of Army culture.

 

I say this is no good, I understand that soldiers also no longer pull guard duty on Army bases and that it done by private security firms. Both Kp and especially guard mount/duty where essential tools in soldiering, for trainees kp was a not only a right of passage but a major componate of molding a new soldier to the ARMY WAY, guard duty even in permenante party units was well lets a say a nessary and in most case's a vital and important fucntion of soldiers,protecting Goverment propert aside it provide the soldier especialy in the combat arms specificaly the Infantry those skills in

attention to detail, alertness and observation that are very essential in combat. Some say its unnessary that pulling guard duty takes away from training...blah...blah....blah, OH YEA, tell that to the living veterans from our wars of the farelly distant past and the ghosts of soldiers going back to the Continental Army.

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I've been in 15 years and never had to pull gate guard. Just had to pull it out in the field and of course at ECPs! However in the last few years I've seen fewer and fewer MPs at the gate. In fact on Ft. Gordon it's a surprise if a MP is at the gate. Normally it's DOD Police, DOD Security Guards, & Wackenhut guards. More and more traditions slip away. Troops don't even shine brass or boots nor low quarters now. Everything is Stay Brite stuff


Be well,

 

Chad C. Rogers

Retired Army

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I've been in 15 years and never had to pull gate guard. Just had to pull it out in the field and of course at ECPs! However in the last few years I've seen fewer and fewer MPs at the gate. In fact on Ft. Gordon it's a surprise if a MP is at the gate. Normally it's DOD Police, DOD Security Guards, & Wackenhut guards. More and more traditions slip away. Troops don't even shine brass or boots nor low quarters now. Everything is Stay Brite stuff

 

WACKENHUT SECURITY ? aren't they guards in shopping malls as well ? :w00t: DOD Police/Security thats a new one to me, I would imagine that they would be ex military, never the less, and so it goes.

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I was a 91B (combat medic/field medic/medical specialist/ Doc/whatever) during my time in the Army.

 

In 1980 as a SP4 leaving a General Dispensary in Korea after 2 years, I was assigned to the 3/7th 197th Inf Bde Separate, located on Kelly Hill, Ft. Benning, GA.

 

Our BN Aid Station consisted of 1 Physician's Assistant (PA CWO 2 or 3) that worked out of the Troop Medical Clinic (TMC) unless we deployed somewhere, 1 Platoon Leader (2LT MSC) 1 Platoon Sergeant (SFC 91B), 1 Asst PSG (SSG 91B), 1 Licensed Practical Nurse (SP6 91C), 7 - 8 SP5 91B that were the squad leaders or motor sergeants and maybe 20-25 91B SP4 and below that pulled sick call and were attached to different companies within the BN. Back then the carer progression for a 91B after PFC was SP4, SP5, SSG, SFC etc...

There were a few that were made an acting Sergeant, but that did not last very long.

 

I myself was attached to a mortar platoon for everything, field problems, range exercises, road marches, deployment to Panama, cold weather training, NTC and any other place we went. I only missed part of 1 ARTAP while there due to my wife having a miscarriage :crying: and it took them 2 days to find me in the woods somewhere in Alabama :think: (our LT was not good at map reading)

Reenlisted just to get out of there. :lol:

 

The only difference between a medic and an infantryman was that I carried an aid bag along with my M16A1 rifle and everything else and we were the last straight leg unit on the hill.

 

Bill


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I was a 91B (combat medic/field medic/medical specialist/ Doc/whatever) during my time in the Army.

 

In 1980 as a SP4 leaving a General Dispensary in Korea after 2 years, I was assigned to the 3/7th 197th Inf Bde Separate, located on Kelly Hill, Ft. Benning, GA.

 

Our BN Aid Station consisted of 1 Physician's Assistant (PA CWO 2 or 3) that worked out of the Troop Medical Clinic (TMC) unless we deployed somewhere, 1 Platoon Leader (2LT MSC) 1 Platoon Sergeant (SFC 91B), 1 Asst PSG (SSG 91B), 1 Licensed Practical Nurse (SP6 91C), 7 - 8 SP5 91B that were the squad leaders or motor sergeants and maybe 20-25 91B SP4 and below that pulled sick call and were attached to different companies within the BN. Back then the carer progression for a 91B after PFC was SP4, SP5, SSG, SFC etc...

There were a few that were made an acting Sergeant, but that did not last very long.

 

I myself was attached to a mortar platoon for everything, field problems, range exercises, road marches, deployment to Panama, cold weather training, NTC and any other place we went. I only missed part of 1 ARTAP while there due to my wife having a miscarriage :crying: and it took them 2 days to find me in the woods somewhere in Alabama :think: (our LT was not good at map reading)

Reenlisted just to get out of there. :lol:

 

The only difference between a medic and an infantryman was that I carried an aid bag along with my M16A1 rifle and everything else and we were the last straight leg unit on the hill.

 

Bill

 

Thanks for your input it was helpfull, as the make up of medical corps structures in the 80s was essintialy the same going back to the 60s, you would be interested to know that are medics in the 4/9 INF did not carry weapons, never did I see them with so much as a .45, on the other hand our cooks when they went out in the field where armed to the teeth, they even drew 60s, each cook section assigned to an idividual rifle company had a 60, now I know what ya'll will say :lol: THEY NEEDED TO PROTECT THEMSELVES WHEN THE TROOPS MUTINIED IN THE FIELD OVER THE LOUSY CHOW THEY HAD TO EAT :w00t:

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Thanks for your input it was helpfull, as the make up of medical corps structures in the 80s was essintialy the same going back to the 60s, you would be interested to know that are medics in the 4/9 INF did not carry weapons, never did I see them with so much as a .45, on the other hand our cooks when they went out in the field where armed to the teeth, they even drew 60s, each cook section assigned to an idividual rifle company had a 60, now I know what ya'll will say :lol: THEY NEEDED TO PROTECT THEMSELVES WHEN THE TROOPS MUTINIED IN THE FIELD OVER THE LOUSY CHOW THEY HAD TO EAT :w00t:

 

 

Not only did we carry our own weapons, the medical platoon was responsible for manning the 50 cal whenever the perimeter was set at night, as an attached medic, I pulled radio watch with the platoon I was with. In garrison we carried a PRC 77 and pulled guard duty around the motor pool, were CQs & ACQs, pulled funeral details, served as BDE & BN runners.

In short, we were extra grunts that also knew how to save lives. 30 some years ago, seems just like yesterday :D


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Not only did we carry our own weapons, the medical platoon was responsible for manning the 50 cal whenever the perimeter was set at night, as an attached medic, I pulled radio watch with the platoon I was with. In garrison we carried a PRC 77 and pulled guard duty around the motor pool, were CQs & ACQs, pulled funeral details, served as BDE & BN runners.

In short, we were extra grunts that also knew how to save lives. 30 some years ago, seems just like yesterday :D

 

In contravention of the Geneva Convention. I'll have to make a report to the Red Cross in Switzerland :whistling: Was this at Benning ? in any event the unit you where in where you would have this extra duties, CQ aside was a tough one in ulitlising all personel, oh I forgot to ask you where you at Benning in january through April of 1980 ? thats when I was going through OSUT.

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In contravention of the Geneva Convention. I'll have to make a report to the Red Cross in Switzerland :whistling: Was this at Benning ? in any event the unit you where in where you would have this extra duties, CQ aside was a tough one in ulitlising all personel, oh I forgot to ask you where you at Benning in january through April of 1980 ? thats when I was going through OSUT.

 

 

Yes, I was there during that time. You would have been out at Sand Hill?

 

Like I said the only difference between a medic and a grunt was the aid bag, we did not keep the aid bag in our foxhole when we were on the 50.

 

I said I was a member of the 197th Inf Bde Separate, separate meaning they played by their own rules. :pinch:

 

We did many things that if the Army knew about they sure did look the other way.

 

Being an experienced medic, I would get loaned out to the Airborne school & Ranger school to provide coverage when they were short medics, that coverage was fun!

 

Got to make a few drops from the towers and got to see a lot of Ft. Benning, got married in Columbus, May of 1980 and she has kept me in line ever since.


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In the 50s and 60s when Specialist 4-9 were still around, how common was it to find 11B's with a Specialist rank. I assume SP4's and SP5's were common, but what about Spec 6s and 7s. I know no solider ever made it to Spec 8 or 9, but I would think that finding an E-6 or E-7 that wasn't an NCO in the Infantry would be rare. Were radiomen condsidered 11Bs? I would understand them being Specialists since you don't really need NCO training to operate a radio.

 

 

Thats right Sand Hill, leaving after 5 days at FT Jackson Reception Station, we got there on the 10th or the 11th of January 1980, the first training cycle to start OSUT, Did you see an earlier recent topic on uniforms I think, another member a Vietnam Veteran posted a site for the 4th Battalion 31st Infantry's 1969-1970 Battalion yearbook, in it I reconized a certain Captain who as a major was our training Battalion Exec, it's a small Army after all. At Benning I seen only a few differant areas, one maybe you can help me was a area of the post that had old dormant barracks, as part of training during AIT we had a 24 hour period of guard duty at these old barracks, I believe they where the Barracks that where occupied by the old 11th Air Assault Division (TEST)there where numerious 11th Air Assault patch placards nailed on barracks' you know those large wood facsimlies of the army shoulder patches, these and a lot of 2nd Infantry Division ones as well, Was this a section of Kelley Hill or Harmony church ?

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Thats right Sand Hill, leaving after 5 days at FT Jackson Reception Station, we got there on the 10th or the 11th of January 1980, the first training cycle to start OSUT, Did you see an earlier recent topic on uniforms I think, another member a Vietnam Veteran posted a site for the 4th Battalion 31st Infantry's 1969-1970 Battalion yearbook, in it I reconized a certain Captain who as a major was our training Battalion Exec, it's a small Army after all. At Benning I seen only a few differant areas, one maybe you can help me was a area of the post that had old dormant barracks, as part of training during AIT we had a 24 hour period of guard duty at these old barracks, I believe they where the Barracks that where occupied by the old 11th Air Assault Division (TEST)there where numerious 11th Air Assault patch placards nailed on barracks' you know those large wood facsimlies of the army shoulder patches, these and a lot of 2nd Infantry Division ones as well, Was this a section of Kelley Hill or Harmony church ?

 

 

 

That sounds like Harmony Church, Kelly Hill was mostly new cinder block buildings.

 

IIRC, Harmony Church was for the Armor units and had many WW II buildings.

 

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That sounds like Harmony Church, Kelly Hill was mostly new cinder block buildings.

 

IIRC, Harmony Church was for the Armor units and had many WW II buildings.

 

Bill

 

The armor units ? the 2nd armored division ? These barracks, filled with ghosts of soldiers past.

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