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WW2 Tent Display


LTGSANCHEZ
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An ebayer is selling a two man tent kit, with pegs and poles and two shelter halves. He has built a real nice wooden frame to support the ropes and corners of the shelter halves for a real cool display. Has anyone built anything similar for display? I would think, if you had the space for it, a full erected tent like this would make an awesome showcase for the junk-on-the-bunk items and field gear.

 

More photos on the actual auction:

 

http://cgi.ebay.com/Early-WWII-tent-2-shel...emZ290178871276

 

tent1106.jpg

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(The following is available on a PDF file you can print out: http://www.usmilitariaforum.com/Shelter_Half_Tent_Stand.pdf

 

Since that is my listing I guess I can share the details of the base.

 

This was born of necessity because my backyard is all concrete patio except for a couple of flower beds.

 

The stand basically consists of two 8-foot-long 1-inch by 4-inch boards and two 8-foot-long 1-inch by 2-inch boards.

 

The 8x1x4 boards are overlapped by about six inches and then fastened together with a few "dry wall screws" (self tapping wood screws actually) to make the long main board. The same type of screws are used to fasten the 8x1x2 boards as crosspieces on the main board.

 

The main board has two one-inch holes drilled five feet apart - these are for the tent poles. The crosspieces are attached to the main board at the holes and attached with two screws. Be sure to square up corners before you attach them.

 

In place of tent pegs I drove a screw in halfway (and at an angle) at each point where you'd use a peg. There are screws at each end of the main board and each end of the cross pieces. In addition one end of the main board has a second screw which is used to anchor the flaps.

 

If you wanted to make a nicer looking display you could replace the "peg screws" with pieces of wooden doweling. In that case you'd drill a hole (at a 45-degree angle) at each of the tent peg points, and then put a short piece of dowel in each hole. If the dowel fits snugly in the hole it should be able to hold without glue (I think).

 

I built my tent stand just to photograph two 1942 tents I have for sale and when I'm done I'll remove the screws and have four eight-foot boards I can use for another project. But for a permanent display I'd suggest trimming the boards so they don't stick out anymore than perhaps 4-inches beyond the "peg screws". Painting the wood to match the color of the floor would also help.

 

Here are some photos including one on which I show the measurements. The yellow circles represent the holes for the tent poles and the yellow squares mark the screw pegs. The yellow curved lines with black measurements next to them show the distance between the points connected by the yellow lines.

 

 

tentstandfront.jpg

 

tentstandleft.jpgtentstandright.jpg

 

tentstand.jpg

 

tentstandspecs.jpg

 

tentstandhole.jpg

 

tentstandscrew.jpg

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Would you believe we once camped an entire BSA troop indoors in a mall for a Scout Exposition? We had them in 7x9' wall tents using similar frames made of 2x4's. (They cooked on hotplates.)

 

G

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craig_pickrall

Pup tent is a fairly common name for the tent. The military version is two halves that button together. Two men share the tent and each carries a half including the guy line, pole and pegs. They are refered to as Shelter Halves.

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Pup tent is a fairly common name for the tent. The military version is two halves that button together. Two men share the tent and each carries a half including the guy line, pole and pegs. They are refered to as Shelter Halves.

 

 

Here is the above tent with both shelter halves rolled into one bundle (this has the original wooden pegs - light but bulky things - and the old style folding poles):

 

tent1106all.jpg

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