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What you have there is an original crate for M1 HPT (High Pressure Test) cartridges. These were used at the arsenals to pressure test each rifle to make sure that the steel was of sufficient strength to withstand normal use and the occasional "hot round" or overloaded cartridge. They generate about 67,000-70,000 psi in the chamber as compared to about 50,000 psi for regular M2 ball. After each rifle was proof tested, the "P" mark would be stamped on the wrist of the the stock to indicate it had passed the test. If the receiver or barrel cracked during firing of the proof cartridge the gun was rejected and other rifles made from that lot of steel may be rejected or pulled out for further inspection. All US service rifles were proof-tested before leaving the arsenal.

 

The cartridges also have a silver colored case to prevent mix-up with standard ball rounds. Continued firing of pressure cartridges could damage any weapon, although Col.Hatcher did prove that the M1 Garand could fire many and still not break.

 

I collect US ammunition and have never seen a crate for these rounds, so I would say it's a fairly uncommon piece. I would date it WWII but it would be hard to pin down a year without a book in front of me. Really nice find! :thumbsup:

Always interested in buying Vietnam-era Air Force, Army helicopter units, and Illinois veteran items.

Looking for items identified to Captain Charles M. Porter, Company C, 131st Infantry, 33rd Division AEF.

 

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What you have there is an original crate for M1 HPT (High Pressure Test) cartridges. These were used at the arsenals to pressure test each rifle to make sure that the steel was of sufficient strength to withstand normal use and the occasional "hot round" or overloaded cartridge. They generate about 67,000-70,000 psi in the chamber as compared to about 50,000 psi for regular M2 ball. After each rifle was proof tested, the "P" mark would be stamped on the wrist of the the stock to indicate it had passed the test. If the receiver or barrel cracked during firing of the proof cartridge the gun was rejected and other rifles made from that lot of steel may be rejected or pulled out for further inspection. All US service rifles were proof-tested before leaving the arsenal.

 

The cartridges also have a silver colored case to prevent mix-up with standard ball rounds. Continued firing of pressure cartridges could damage any weapon, although Col.Hatcher did prove that the M1 Garand could fire many and still not break.

 

I collect US ammunition and have never seen a crate for these rounds, so I would say it's a fairly uncommon piece. I would date it WWII but it would be hard to pin down a year without a book in front of me. Really nice find! :thumbsup:

Thanks for the info,I guess these stayed in the Arsenal,maybe why it is not painted.Thanks for the reply.

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