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I just saw two Youtubes on a 3-d printer that prints on resin. You can even have moving parts! How soon will we see insignias and other stuff duplicated on this printer?

 

:think:

 

For historians, interpretewrs, :thumbsup:

 

For collectors, though, it will be, :thumbdown:

 

See the following links:

 

and here.

 

Take care,

 

Luis R.

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I've actually gotten to play with one of these and have even made militaria with it. None of you have anything to worry about unless the military starts building stuff out of resin. You won't mistake a resin piece for the original item.

 

I do see a use for this from a collector's standpoint. You could make resin knives, pistols, magazines, etc. for use in displays. They take up the same amount of space, they are just significantly lighter. Oh yeah, if you "copy" a .45 auto pistol for example, you would have to copy it piece by piece to be able to have moving parts. You'll also have to know how to do some filing etc. to make the pieces fit. It is far easier just to make the one "copy" and be done with it.

 

Finally, no, I am not willing to make pieces. I don't own one of these, but do have access, but I don't want to waste my goodwill with the owner by trying to make stuff for others.

 

Allan

Never under-estimate the power of prayer.

 

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I've actually gotten to play with one of these and have even made militaria with it. None of you have anything to worry about unless the military starts building stuff out of resin. You won't mistake a resin piece for the original item.

 

I do see a use for this from a collector's standpoint. You could make resin knives, pistols, magazines, etc. for use in displays. They take up the same amount of space, they are just significantly lighter. Oh yeah, if you "copy" a .45 auto pistol for example, you would have to copy it piece by piece to be able to have moving parts. You'll also have to know how to do some filing etc. to make the pieces fit. It is far easier just to make the one "copy" and be done with it.

 

Finally, no, I am not willing to make pieces. I don't own one of these, but do have access, but I don't want to waste my goodwill with the owner by trying to make stuff for others.

 

Allan

 

Plus its not cheap to make the items.The market isnt going to be flooded with resin MOHs. :)

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$14,900 is dirt cheap!!! :w00t: I am familiar with people who dropped $30,000 or more on a small unit. :pinch:

California

 

"Only 2 defining forces have ever offered to die for you....Jesus Christ and the American Soldier.

One died for your soul, the other for your freedom."

 

-Lt. Col. Grant L. Rosensteel, Jr.

USAF

 

''A government big enough to give you everything you want, is big enough to take away everything you have.'' Gerald Ford

 

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I myself have access to a suite of these machines. I recently got a commission from a Belgian re-enactor to produce 5 copies of a very rare unit cap badge.

 

He supplied the original, this was then laser scanned and refined and worked on in 3d sculpting software. It was enlarged slightly to allow for casting shrinkage. Date marks were also added to the back (along with a few hidden tweaks) to make it couldn't be passed off as an original.

The 3D print of the completed badge was quite rough and took a fair amount of work to smooth out. After this was done a mould was made in vulcanised rubber and several wax casts were produced. These were then passed onto a friend who cast the final copies.

 

In short it cost about the same for this process as getting a jeweller to hand make one badge, you'd still need to be a pretty competent modeller and mould maker but it does lend itself well to pattern making.

As an experimental process it was interesting but too labour intensive to be cost effective. It'd be a long time before I'd try it again.

 

As for fully printed replica weapons and militaria good to go out of the printer? They're a long, long way off.

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I've actually gotten to play with one of these and have even made militaria with it. None of you have anything to worry about unless the military starts building stuff out of resin. You won't mistake a resin piece for the original item.

 

I do see a use for this from a collector's standpoint. You could make resin knives, pistols, magazines, etc. for use in displays. They take up the same amount of space, they are just significantly lighter. Oh yeah, if you "copy" a .45 auto pistol for example, you would have to copy it piece by piece to be able to have moving parts. You'll also have to know how to do some filing etc. to make the pieces fit. It is far easier just to make the one "copy" and be done with it.

 

Finally, no, I am not willing to make pieces. I don't own one of these, but do have access, but I don't want to waste my goodwill with the owner by trying to make stuff for others.

 

Allan

 

Stop the presses... here is a 3D printer that can make an object with moving parts, fully assembled!

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZboxMsSz5Aw...be_gdata_player

Gil Burket
Omaha, NE
Specializing in Fakes and Reproductions
of the Vietnam War

burkcats@hotmail.com

 

"One is easily fooled by that which one loves."

 

Moliere: Tartuffe

 

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That one, I believe is faked. The "printed" wrench is clearly different than the original. How can a hand held scanner capture the internal parts required for a functional, moving object? Bogus....

 

The video with the wrench is the real deal. Here is an article on Snopes regarding the discrepancies between the original and printed version....

 

Snopes - 3D Wrench

 

Amazing techology, I must say! Imagine the applications in everything from medical, to military to personal....

Eric

ASMIC #5492

 

Are you a militaria collector in PA, NJ or DE? If so, please feel free to join my "Delaware Valley Militaria Collectors" page on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/MilitariaCollectorsOfDelawareValley#!/groups/DELVALMILITARIA/

 

Check me out on Instagram @philly_militaria_collector

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The video with the wrench is the real deal. Here is an article on Snopes regarding the discrepancies between the original and printed version....

 

Snopes - 3D Wrench

 

Amazing techology, I must say! Imagine the applications in everything from medical, to military to personal....

 

That article explains that they actually CAN'T scan an object and make it's exact duplicate. They have to essentially manufacture it on the computer......

 

Ian

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That article explains that they actually CAN'T scan an object and make it's exact duplicate. They have to essentially manufacture it on the computer......

 

Ian

 

I was elaborating on your response regarding the end result differing from the original. While engineers must finish the design to incorporate the internal moving components not seen by the scanner, it still eliminates the process of having to put together the parts as the end copy is completely functional. Someday, though, they'll have a work around for that flaw.

 

I'm sure in the years to come, when these become available at a price reasonable to consumers, and they have advanced the process, you'll be able to go on iTunes and purchase preloaded schematics of the item you want to replicate.

 

The major drawback I see is with respect to copyright laws. What's to stop someone from mass producing items for resale? Obviously it's limited now; you can't replicate an electronic devise, or in material other than that used in the video, but I'm sure in due time this could change.

 

While this could be used in so many positive ways, someone will come up with a way to use the technology to make a buck illegally; as with everything.

 

Still, amazing how far we've advanced in such a short period of time. 300+ years ago, the guys in the video would have been burned at the stake for witchery!

Eric

ASMIC #5492

 

Are you a militaria collector in PA, NJ or DE? If so, please feel free to join my "Delaware Valley Militaria Collectors" page on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/MilitariaCollectorsOfDelawareValley#!/groups/DELVALMILITARIA/

 

Check me out on Instagram @philly_militaria_collector

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