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My WWI Era Portrait Collection


cthomas
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My last armed portrait for today. A nice wartime 'Over There' image of a doughboy posing amongst some ruins & sporting the last style of cartridge belt issued to American soldiers who served in the Great War. This pattern used the same lift/dot fasteners as previous models but without the bunched bottoms. This was done to facilitate production.

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An unknown DSC recipient of Infantry Co. L, 29th 'Blue-Grey' Division. He wears an embroidered SSI. I have this guy narrowed down to two possibl3 candidates.

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General George Washington Goethals & staff at the Panama Canal. Gen. Goethals is second from left. After seeing to the construction of the Panama Canal, Goethals went on to build the Goethals bridge in N.Y. City. This bridge was opened June 29th, 1928 and connected Brooklyn (via Staten Island) to the N.J. turnpike.

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George Willard Christman of the 26th 'Yankee' Division in 1918. Christman, a native of Birmingham, Ala. moved to San Diego, CA. He wears an embroidered variant of the 26th's SSI. Notice he served at least 2 years overseas. There's a hint of something on his right sleeve that may be a wound stripe.

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OK...got one more for today and it's a winner! Check this out:

 

An American female ambulance driver who served with the French military. She wears the rank of sergeant in the medical service and chevrons with over 6 months service, but not 1 year. Note the use of French collar insignia. I'm trying to positively ID the cap device she wears. They look American. Can anyone help me positively ID it? Signed by the photographer 'Zamphel Studio NY'. Not 100% on the studio name.

 

Chuck,

 

This young lady is wearing the uniform of the Motor Corps of America. They mostly served in larger American cities driving ambulances, and doing "War work" like delivering supplies for the defense industry. Although from the onset, the intent of the Motor Corps was to serve overseas, none did before the war ended. When the Ammunition Plant at Perth Amboy New Jersey exploded, the Motor Corps was involved in evacuating the injured. A few of these women were decorated by the State of New York for their courage.

 

Here is a Howard Chandler Christie poster that was used to recruit for the Corps

 

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Chris

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Chuck,

 

This young lady is wearing the uniform of the Motor Corps of America. They mostly served in larger American cities driving ambulances, and doing "War work" like delivering supplies for the defense industry. Although from the onset, the intent of the Motor Corps was to serve overseas, none did before the war ended. When the Ammunition Plant at Perth Amboy New Jersey exploded, the Motor Corps was involved in evacuating the injured. A few of these women were decorated by the State of New York for their courage.

 

Here is a Howard Chandler Christie poster that was used to recruit for the Corps

 

post-594-1194214493.jpg

 

Chris

 

 

Chris-

Thanks a lot for posting that image. That does look very similar to the uniform in the one I posted and it sure helps me get an understanding of the content. I think though, that my gal did go overseas. Aren't those OS chevrons I see on her sleeve think.gif ? Someone who knows a little more on these uniforms please feel free to correct me... Thanks again Chris! This poster was a big help thumbsup.gif

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Chris-

Thanks a lot for posting that image. That does look very similar to the uniform in the one I posted and it sure helps me get an understanding of the content. I think though, that my gal did go overseas. Aren't those OS chevrons I see on her sleeve think.gif ? Someone who knows a little more on these uniforms please feel free to correct me... Thanks again Chris! This poster was a big help thumbsup.gif

 

Chuck,

 

I am relatively certain those are not "overseas stripes." Worn on that (the right) sleeve, those would be wound chevrons anyway. Most likely, those chevrons represent completion of some sort of Motor Corps training.

 

At any rate, she is wearing a Motor Corps of America uniform. If you would like to read more about the Motor Corps, their service, and their uniforms check out; Jill Smith's Dressed for Duty books, Letty Gavin's American Women In WW1, and Susan Zeigler's In Uncle Sam's Service. All three are good books and there is information on the Motor Corps in each about them.

 

Chris

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Chuck,

 

I am relatively certain those are not "overseas stripes." Worn on that (the right) sleeve, those would be wound chevrons anyway. Most likely, those chevrons represent completion of some sort of Motor Corps training.

 

At any rate, she is wearing a Motor Corps of America uniform. If you would like to read more about the Motor Corps, their service, and their uniforms check out; Jill Smith's Dressed for Duty books, Letty Gavin's American Women In WW1, and Susan Zeigler's In Uncle Sam's Service. All three are good books and there is information on the Motor Corps in each about them.

 

Chris

 

Chris-

Will do. Thanks! I agree with you on the possibility that the chevrons are an indication of training completed or maybe even time in service. I appreciate your replies. You've been a big help on this one.

-Chuck

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Here's a nice group portrait of a bunch of doughboys 'Over There'. Note they all appear to be carrying M1917 Colt Revolvers and a few wear machetes or bolo knives. Most are wearing issued shirts & one guy chose to wear a sweater. There's a little French boy in the left background intent on the goings on here.

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A black doughboy somewhere 'Over There'. He has an unidentified ribbon bar with a star device in center. Doesn't look like a 'Victory' ribbon or a Occupation one. There also appears to be a hint of a marksmanship bar above.

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Another one of my DSC portraits but this one is ID'd ;)

 

Herman Korth of the 121st M.G., 32 Div. Awarded DSC for actions in Juvigny August 31

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And my last one for today....

 

An unidentified Pilot posing with his brother. I have a nice close-up image of the wings he wears that I found on the net. I will post it here and hope I'm not stepping on any toes.

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A black doughboy somewhere 'Over There'. He has an unidentified ribbon bar with a star device in center. Doesn't look like a 'Victory' ribbon or a Occupation one. There also appears to be a hint of a marksmanship bar above.

 

Croix de Guerre ribbon maybe? It could still be a Victory Medal ribbon, but certainly not an Occupation Medal ribbon. The US Army WW1 Occupation of Germany medal was not instituted until 1941.

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Croix de Guerre ribbon maybe? It could still be a Victory Medal ribbon, but certainly not an Occupation Medal ribbon. The US Army WW1 Occupation of Germany medal was not instituted until 1941.

 

 

I don't know for sure. Here's a detailed shot. Maybe someone has a better idea of what it could be.

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A private portrait of General James Guthrie Harbord wearing the Commander grade of the Légion d'honneur. In June 1918, General Harbord was given command of the 4th Marine Brigade which was then attached to the 2nd Division. Gen Harbord commanded the Marines during the battles of Château-Thierry (July 18, 1918) & Belleau Wood (1-26 June 1918). For a more complete biography of Gen. Harbord, I suggest this link:James G. Harbord courtesy of Wikipedia

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An RPPC (Real Photo Postcard) of Jesse Garvey of the 51st Pioneer Infantry taken in Germany January 28, 1919. Note on back to Grandma & Grandpa Garvey of Saugerties, N.Y. which was cleared by Army censorship. He wears the M1917 overcoat with an SSI that's hard to make out.

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