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1920's training grenade.


Baker502
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Is this a 20's training grenade since its painted red? or something else, and whats the value of something like this.. All the best Paul

 

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Yes the grenade is empty

That is always nice to know. :thumbsup: That is a nice and rare piece. The site I referenced above has an extensive collection.

edit

Opps you asked value also. I have no idea. I have never seen one for sale.

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Yes, I believe you have an early training grenade. It has an early cut-back fuse with a short spoon. Leave it as is, I have seen these regularly go for around $150 bucks. Nice grenade.

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Your grenade at one time was a "live" one. But this appears to have been INERTed properly. Hold onto it because of the color which is quite rare these days. The screw at the bottom was for introducing either EC powder or flaked TNT and then sealed off with the large screw at the bottom. Yours is pretty beat up but you may be able to find a newer one year: http://www.bocn.co.uk/vbforum/forum.php These people ARE the ones to contact if you have any type of ordnance question. They do their homework and will help anyone. I am a member there in case the one person wants to know? We even will go out of our way to provide you with THE best information.

 

But back to yours, you have a grenade from back during WWI and supposedly were colored this way out of the possibility of the French coloring (RED - Meaning Explosive if true) system so as to not fool anyone into thinking that it wasn't live. Yours probably goes back to WWI I believe. Now when you get towards WWII you will find the bottoms have no filler hole. It is all solid iron, no openings. Sure, there will be the ones with the screws still being used. One last item, The "pineapples" would remain in service up to and into the Vietnam War whereby they were no longer any of them in stock. They had made many.

 

Hope this helps you out a little.

 

Mark

MACVSOG "Living Historian"

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