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Can anyone tell me around what time a Marlin Rockwell manufactured BAR with 260xxx serial number was made? Has been converted to A2 standard.

 

 

ThompsonSavage,

 

Around 2:30pm? :lol:

 

Seriously, though, I looked at my copy of Jim Ballou's book on the BAR, titled, "Rock In A Hard Place," and it did not have exact production dates. If the BAR you refer to is above 260,000, then it actually falls just outside the high end of serial numbers he indicates were allocated to Marlin-Rockwell. He states that there were 2 serial number blocks assigned, from 23000 to 64000, and 245000 to 260000. He says the first BAR was produced by Marlin-Rockwell on June 11, 1918, and that by the end of July, they had produced 5,650 BARs. There is a report he references that indicates a total of 16,000 Marlin-Rockwells were produced, but he also states that serial numbers of observed examples indicate that production was actually much higher.

 

David Albert

dalbert@sturmgewehr.com

NRA Life Member
Past President, The American Thompson Association
American Society of Arms Collectors
Ohio Gun Collectors Association
Carbine Club
Garand Collectors Association

International Ammunition Association
Contributing Writer, Small Arms Review Magazine
Co-Author, "Thompson Manuals, Catalogs, & Other Paper Items" Collector Guide
One of the "Other Authors" of "The Ultimate Thompson Book," by Tracie L. Hill
Eagle Scout, and Member of NESA

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Colonial humor :P

 

The seller did not mention the exact number. Maybe he meant to say 260xxxx instead of 260xxx.

 

I have another question: is there a difference between WW2 black plastic buttstocks and KW ones? If so, how do you tell them apart?

Always looking for mint condition WW2 US combat gear, equipment, helmets and uniforms -

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ThompsonSavage,

 

I think the 260XXX serial number is probably accurate. On many occasions, published serial number data can be incorrect, or can be revised based on historical research, or examination of existing examples of firearms. In this case, if the serial number were 260,500, for example, then it is evidence that Marlin Rockwell's serial number range extends beyond the 260,000 that records indicated when the book I mentioned was researched.

 

I'm not sure about the buttstock. Let me see what I can find out. I've seen both versions, but never really thought about timelines or specific contracts that might indicate when they were made.

 

David Albert

dalbert@sturmgewehr.com

NRA Life Member
Past President, The American Thompson Association
American Society of Arms Collectors
Ohio Gun Collectors Association
Carbine Club
Garand Collectors Association

International Ammunition Association
Contributing Writer, Small Arms Review Magazine
Co-Author, "Thompson Manuals, Catalogs, & Other Paper Items" Collector Guide
One of the "Other Authors" of "The Ultimate Thompson Book," by Tracie L. Hill
Eagle Scout, and Member of NESA

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It's an internet auction, I will contact the seller again. But I'm afraid I will have to let this one get away. Price is getting too high, and I'm already maxed out :crying:

Always looking for mint condition WW2 US combat gear, equipment, helmets and uniforms -

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I have another question: is there a difference between WW2 black plastic buttstocks and KW ones? If so, how do you tell them apart?

 

You can have a look there > http://90thidpg.us/Equipment/Articles/BARStocks/index.html ... there is some differences between WW2 et KW buttstocks :think:

Collecting USMC AEF 1917-18 & PTO 1941-45, US Navy PTO 1941-45.

 

Most seeked items : USMC dog tags from 1915 to 1945, USN corpsman dog tags and other identified items, USN id'd M1 helmets.



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That's right, take off the sling swivel and there should be a date, at least on the WWII ones.

Tom Bowers

 

 

I have a 43 dated brown bakelite stock marked this way.

“There's not much I can tell you about this war. It's like all wars, I guess.The undertakers are winning.The politicians who talk about the glory of it.The old men who talk about the need of it.The soldiers, well, they just wanna go home.” Jimmy Stewart in Shenandoah

 

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Some new info: barrel is dated NE 6/44, SN is 260468

 

ThompsonSavage,

 

Thanks for posting the photo. I'm going to forward it to the author of the BAR book.

 

Thanks!

 

David Albert

dalbert@sturmgewehr.com

NRA Life Member
Past President, The American Thompson Association
American Society of Arms Collectors
Ohio Gun Collectors Association
Carbine Club
Garand Collectors Association

International Ammunition Association
Contributing Writer, Small Arms Review Magazine
Co-Author, "Thompson Manuals, Catalogs, & Other Paper Items" Collector Guide
One of the "Other Authors" of "The Ultimate Thompson Book," by Tracie L. Hill
Eagle Scout, and Member of NESA

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New England Small Arms Company

 

A WW2 Manufacturer of M1918A2 BAR

 

Actually, there is more to the "NE" marking story. The marking "NE" indicates it was manufactured by one of several companies that formed a consortium during WWII, known as New England Small Arms. They manufactured BAR parts, and most interestingly to me, they manufactured Reising Submachine Gun magazines. Each member of the consortium were assigned a number, from NE-1 to NE-9. Another writer and I have been trying to determine more details regarding these companies, and the specific designation numbers they were assigned. I've been surveying Reising magazines for a few years now, and have a spreadsheet with data collected from 225 different examples, indicating which manufacturer code is marked on each one. If you're interested, you can read the thread about it on Machinegunboards.com at the link below.

 

http://www.machinegunboards.com/forums/ind...?showtopic=9976

 

If anyone on this board has more information about the number assignments for each company that participated in the WWII New England Small Arms consortium, I'd be very interested in hearing abut it.

 

David Albert

dalbert@sturmgewehr.com

NRA Life Member
Past President, The American Thompson Association
American Society of Arms Collectors
Ohio Gun Collectors Association
Carbine Club
Garand Collectors Association

International Ammunition Association
Contributing Writer, Small Arms Review Magazine
Co-Author, "Thompson Manuals, Catalogs, & Other Paper Items" Collector Guide
One of the "Other Authors" of "The Ultimate Thompson Book," by Tracie L. Hill
Eagle Scout, and Member of NESA

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  • 4 months later...
  • 1 year later...

Bringing this back to the top...as of yesterday i am now the proud owner of a New England Small Arms BAR....barrel date 6/44....serial number 580***.....

 

now to start collecting all the tools and accessories to go with it....:-(

 

I can hear the good lady crying already......:-)

 

regards

 

Lloyd

What do you need another one of those for.....you have 6 of them already ?.........

:blink:

 

my girlfriend to me on a regular basis as another piece of US WW2 "Green stuff" aka militaria arrives in the post..:-)

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donation2007.gifdonation2008.gifdonation2009.gifdonation2010.gifdonation2013.gifdonation2016.gifdonation2018.gifdonation2019.gif

 

 

 

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