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Dark d-day Pliofilm cover?

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It is generally accepted that only clear Pliofilm covers were used during the D-day landings. So what am I looking at here?

 

Picture from www.britannica.com with caption: U.S. troops and equipment lined up “somewhere in England” prior to embarking on the Normandy Invasion, World War II. It sure looks like d-day troops (M5 masks, parachutist's first aid, eto bars, British MP(?), air vent on tank), but I'm not seeing air intake tubes on the halftracks. Either the caption is wrong and this is some other operation, or I am seeing something that looks like a dark Pliofilm cover.

 

Comments and enlightment PLEASE!

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Always looking for mint condition WW2 US combat gear, equipment, helmets and uniforms -

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THere are other pictures showing the dark green covers in use in Normandy....

 

Representative? No, but a few were used...


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I learned something new today :thumbsup: . Any chance of posting those pictures?


Always looking for mint condition WW2 US combat gear, equipment, helmets and uniforms -

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Where these dark covers first manufactured in 1943 or in 1944? What's the earliest known production date of dark covers?


Always looking for mint condition WW2 US combat gear, equipment, helmets and uniforms -

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Hello!

I have several different covers, but all WWII I have seen are 1944-45 dated. This obviously doesn't mean that they were manufactured earlier in 1943... Here some pictures, the first one is dated 1945, the last two 1944... By the way these, as you can see, are the small ones, for pistol and/or personal effects...

Fausto

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I have a number of covers dated in 1943. I wrote to Jon Gawne a number of years ago when he stated in his Normandy book that he doubted any were used. I sent him one of mine dated in 1943 and referred to some photos showing dark covers. I doubt that many were there but some were.

 

Ken

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post-344-1308170414.jpg

 

 

2ID on D+1

 

 

Hi Johan, interesting to see one of each light and dark rifle covers in this photo you added, which possibly shows both being issued at same period. .

 

When I ran my store I had hundreds of the opaque covers in bundles unissued and my earliest dates were March 1943, over two months prior to D-day.

 

ken

 

 

.


.

Young enough to care and enjoy militaria - Old enough to remember as surplus

 

" Life's too short for reproductions "

 

 

Life is like a tank of gas, the closer you get to a quarter tank, the faster it goes 

 

.

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When I ran my store I had hundreds of the opaque covers in bundles unissued and my earliest dates were March 1943, over two months prior to D-day.

 

ken[/font]

.

 

Ken, think you made a typo? Unless you are referring to another "D-Day" in 1943? :think: Anyway you are right, it's over two months prior to June 1944, one year and two months.

 

The covers you mention used to be all over the place in unused condition, didn't seem like many wanted them.


"It is a capital mistake to theorize before one has data. Insensibly one begins to twist facts to suit theories, instead of theories to suit facts."

*Sherlock Holmes in "A Scandal in Bohemia"*

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Ken, think you made a typo? Unless you are referring to another "D-Day" in 1943? :think: Anyway you are right, it's over two months prior to June 1944, one year and two months.

 

The covers you mention used to be all over the place in unused condition, didn't seem like many wanted them.

 

 

Hi Rusty, think you caught me out with my speed typing :lol: , had a whole bunch of stuff running through my mind last night along with incoming phone calls whilst I was typing, perhaps I can't mult-task as good as I used to, time to retire perhaps. :crying:

 

My brother-in-law hates using my computer as I have worn all the letters off the keys and he has to look for the keys, :crying: if it works don't fix it.

 

So your right fourteen months before D-Day 1944 stand corrected

 

ken


.

Young enough to care and enjoy militaria - Old enough to remember as surplus

 

" Life's too short for reproductions "

 

 

Life is like a tank of gas, the closer you get to a quarter tank, the faster it goes 

 

.

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Well, you were still right. :lol:

 

 

Luckily I think most of know what date "D-Day" (1944) was anyway. Don't worry, I don't think using a "3" where a "4" is supposed to be means you need to retire. :thumbsup:


"It is a capital mistake to theorize before one has data. Insensibly one begins to twist facts to suit theories, instead of theories to suit facts."

*Sherlock Holmes in "A Scandal in Bohemia"*

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I have a number of covers dated in 1943.

And no wonder. The Pliofilm was pre-WWII invention. In 1943 the Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company advertised its Pliofilm intensively. They wrote as follows in their ads:

 

All American military aircraft engines are now sealed in a dehydrated atmosphere without grease-packing, in moisture-vapour-air-tight envelopes of Pliofilm, supplied by Goodyear. Pliofilm's ability to seal out corroding moisture makes it the perfect shipping package for all parts and instruments requiring such protection.

 

Source: Aviation, Vol. 42 No. 11, November 1943


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It's very clear (ahem) that they were used in small numbers. If you go through enough photos you will see that the ratio of green to clear is pretty small though.

 

The clear ones may also have been more popular as they were very useful in doing things like making clear covers for papers, maps, etc. I've had guys tell me they used them for that, but I doubt that anyone had a choice- they got what was issued.

 

Knowing the army, the covers in the UK had probably been stockpiled quite a while beforehand in the great building up. By mid 1944 I would suspect (and no one can probably ever proove this) that the majority of what was then being made for amphibious landings was going to the Pacific. That's something about dates of manufacture and logistics- you have to take into account the big picture, and the logical thing would be to ship enough to the UK for what you assumed you would need for the landing in France, especially as they had plans for an emergancy landing in case of German collpase, and when that number was reached start shipping to the Pacific.

 

Probably the ones we find today are almost all the leftover stock that was destined for the invasion of Japan and never left the USA.

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Here are a few dug up rifle protective covers from Normandy.

 

 

This one was found by friend Jules in Utah Beach sector

 

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This one by Kbec also near Utah

 

 

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Now the first dug up found on Hill 108. No stamped marking on it

 

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The second one found a few feet from the previous.

 

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The stamp, dated Sept 1943

 

 

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Yannick


In memory of S/Sgt Sherwood H. Hallman (PA) F co, 175th Rgt, 29th division, BSM, PH w/olc (wounded in action june 8th in Normandy), MEDAL OF HONOR for action at Ilioc farm, Plouzané Sept 11 1944, KIA near Fort Keranroux, Brest Sept 14 1944. His son Sherwood Hallman II wearing the Medal. All my love to my adoptive family in Pennsylvania USA and to all my veteran friends.
You're the best!
29 LET'S GO!



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And this clear one with an unusual stamp marking (unfortunately illisible...) different from the dark covers. It was found near Utah by digger friend Jules. The condition is excellent.

 

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Yannick


In memory of S/Sgt Sherwood H. Hallman (PA) F co, 175th Rgt, 29th division, BSM, PH w/olc (wounded in action june 8th in Normandy), MEDAL OF HONOR for action at Ilioc farm, Plouzané Sept 11 1944, KIA near Fort Keranroux, Brest Sept 14 1944. His son Sherwood Hallman II wearing the Medal. All my love to my adoptive family in Pennsylvania USA and to all my veteran friends.
You're the best!
29 LET'S GO!



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Not bad, considering we only burried them 10 years ago... ;)

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Hé hé Jon!! ;)

 

 

And this other one found by Norman collectors near St Lô. they displayed it in 2009 in St George d'Elle.

 

 

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Yannick


In memory of S/Sgt Sherwood H. Hallman (PA) F co, 175th Rgt, 29th division, BSM, PH w/olc (wounded in action june 8th in Normandy), MEDAL OF HONOR for action at Ilioc farm, Plouzané Sept 11 1944, KIA near Fort Keranroux, Brest Sept 14 1944. His son Sherwood Hallman II wearing the Medal. All my love to my adoptive family in Pennsylvania USA and to all my veteran friends.
You're the best!
29 LET'S GO!



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