Jump to content

Important WW1 Era Photo


Recommended Posts

While surfing the web, I came across this fantastic photograph of Julia Stimson, the Chief of the Army Nurse Corps from 1919 to 1937 and three other Army Nurses.

 

Just for fun lets see who can guess first why this is such an interesting photo:

 

 

post-594-1304821692.jpg

 

 

Chris

767409605_sigcustom3.png.e95257302e2a500ba241cd8cdc44ff0c.png

Link to post
Share on other sites

...as in Sec'y of War Stimson? Also love the fact that the old bird served 2 years overseas.

Looking for for 37th Division

VietNam and earlier Special Forces &

USS Hemminger DE 746 items

"Political correctness is a doctrine, fostered by a delusional, illogical minority, and rapidly promoted by mainstream media, which holds forth the proposition that it is entirely possible to pick up a turd by the clean end."

See my FB sales page: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1928884587130681/pending/

 

 

donation2007.gifdonation2008.gifdonation2009.gif

donation2010.gifdonation2011.gifdonation2012.gifdonation2013.gif

Link to post
Share on other sites
...as in Sec'y of War Stimson? Also love the fact that the old bird served 2 years overseas.

 

As far as I know, Julia Stimpson was not related to Secretary of War Henry Stimson, although they may have been; I just have never seen that mentioned anywhere.

767409605_sigcustom3.png.e95257302e2a500ba241cd8cdc44ff0c.png

Link to post
Share on other sites
I'll play...first woman to be decorated with a DSM?

 

Hmm, I'm not sure if she was the first, but she certainly was one of the first. Grace Banker, head of the Signal Corps "Hello Girls" also was awarded the DSM...

 

But any picture of Julia Stimson could meet that criteria, but this one is of special interest to militaria collectors.

767409605_sigcustom3.png.e95257302e2a500ba241cd8cdc44ff0c.png

Link to post
Share on other sites

Is it the neckwear on the middle nurse?

Looking for for 37th Division

VietNam and earlier Special Forces &

USS Hemminger DE 746 items

"Political correctness is a doctrine, fostered by a delusional, illogical minority, and rapidly promoted by mainstream media, which holds forth the proposition that it is entirely possible to pick up a turd by the clean end."

See my FB sales page: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1928884587130681/pending/

 

 

donation2007.gifdonation2008.gifdonation2009.gif

donation2010.gifdonation2011.gifdonation2012.gifdonation2013.gif

Link to post
Share on other sites

Is that Elizabeth Will???

donation2009.gifdonation2010.gifdonation2011.gifdonation2012.gifdonation2013.gifdonation2014.gifdonation2015.gif

Actively seeking North Carolina and 30th infantry Division-related items from all periods.

Also looking for items belonging to veterans that went to The Citadel in Charleston.

 

Troop D, 1-150th Cavalry RGT, 30th HBCT. M1A1 SEP Tank Commander.

OMSA member #7423

US Army Historical Foundation Charter Member

US Army Brotherhood of Tankers member

American Association For State and Local History

Southeasren Museums Conference

Southeastern Registrars Association

Link to post
Share on other sites
Is it the neckwear on the middle nurse?

Good guess, but Army Nurses were allowed to wear "commercial shirtwaists" (shirts) under their walking out uniforms. That ended in 1920 when the new olive drab uniform replaced the blue WW1 era suit.

767409605_sigcustom3.png.e95257302e2a500ba241cd8cdc44ff0c.png

Link to post
Share on other sites
Good guess, but Army Nurses were allowed to wear "commercial shirtwaists" (shirts) under their walking out uniforms. That ended in 1920 when the new olive drab uniform replaced the blue WW1 era suit.

 

 

Arggghhh!

Looking for for 37th Division

VietNam and earlier Special Forces &

USS Hemminger DE 746 items

"Political correctness is a doctrine, fostered by a delusional, illogical minority, and rapidly promoted by mainstream media, which holds forth the proposition that it is entirely possible to pick up a turd by the clean end."

See my FB sales page: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1928884587130681/pending/

 

 

donation2007.gifdonation2008.gifdonation2009.gif

donation2010.gifdonation2011.gifdonation2012.gifdonation2013.gif

Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is a picture of Major Stimpson wearing the olive drab uniform that was authorized in 1920:

 

post-594-1304824948.jpg

767409605_sigcustom3.png.e95257302e2a500ba241cd8cdc44ff0c.png

Link to post
Share on other sites
While surfing the web, I came across this fantastic photograph of Julia Stimson, the Chief of the Army Nurse Corps from 1919 to 1937 and three other Army Nurses.

 

Just for fun lets see who can guess first why this is such an interesting photo:

post-594-1304821692.jpg

Chris

What do the 4 stripes on the left sleeve mean? - I think 3 are sergeant

Link to post
Share on other sites
memphismeister

"After her service in the First World War, Stimson remained with the military, becoming the superintendent of the Army Nurse Corps and the first dean of the Army School of Nursing. In 1920 she became the first woman to achieve the rank of major in the U.S. Army. Stimson retired from the Army in 1937 and then served as president of the American Nurses Association from 1938 until 1944. Stimson returned to the Army during World War II to recruit nurses to the Army Nurse Corps, retiring a second time at the end of the war. Stimson was promoted to the rank of full colonel six weeks before her death, at the age of 67, in 1948"

 

May 26, 1881 - Bom on May 26, 1881, in Worcester, Massachusetts, Julia Stimson was a cousin of Henry L. Stimson, later secretary of war and of state

Son of

CW2 Bernard E Meister 2/14/70

334th AHC 69/70 189th AHC 67/68 155th AHC 67

TAC Officer 1968 Fort Wolters

USMC 1956-1959

Link to post
Share on other sites
What do the 4 stripes on the left sleeve mean? - I think 3 are sergeant

 

Worn on the left sleeve, those are WW1 overseas service chevrons. In gold, each one represented 6 months service in the "Zone of Operations." In silver 6 months service outside the zone of operations, and in blue less than six months service in the Zone of Operations.

 

Since Miss Stimson was overseas, it is safe to guess that hers are gold.

767409605_sigcustom3.png.e95257302e2a500ba241cd8cdc44ff0c.png

Link to post
Share on other sites
"After her service in the First World War, Stimson remained with the military, becoming the superintendent of the Army Nurse Corps and the first dean of the Army School of Nursing. In 1920 she became the first woman to achieve the rank of major in the U.S. Army. Stimson retired from the Army in 1937 and then served as president of the American Nurses Association from 1938 until 1944. Stimson returned to the Army during World War II to recruit nurses to the Army Nurse Corps, retiring a second time at the end of the war. Stimson was promoted to the rank of full colonel six weeks before her death, at the age of 67, in 1948"

 

May 26, 1881 - Bom on May 26, 1881, in Worcester, Massachusetts, Julia Stimson was a cousin of Henry L. Stimson, later secretary of war and of state

 

post-594-1304868768.jpg

 

The important part is; "in 1920..." Two things happened in 1920: 1) Women Nurses were authorized to wear "relative rank." 2) Army Nurses got a new uniform. The photograph above is a Harris and Ewing official photograph of Julia Stimson wearing her new rank--but not the new uniform. Note she is wearing the WW1 era blue uniform with its pleated pockets and no shoulder straps. Later that same year, the new uniform came out with shoulder straps provisioned for rank. The combination of WW1 blue uniform and rank insignia was extremely short lived. This is the only picture I have ever seen of this combination. Indeed, this picture may have been taken the very day women were authorized to wear officer's rank insignia.

 

Note as well, that Julia Stimson and the nurse behind her to the left both have black mohair braids encircling the cuffs of their uniform. This very scarce modification denoted "head nurse".

 

Chris

767409605_sigcustom3.png.e95257302e2a500ba241cd8cdc44ff0c.png

Link to post
Share on other sites

Finally, here is Julia Stimson wearing the Olive Drab uniform for her 1920 official portrait (again Harris and Ewing). You can just make out her major's oak leaves on her shoulder straps.

 

post-594-1304869417.jpg

767409605_sigcustom3.png.e95257302e2a500ba241cd8cdc44ff0c.png

Link to post
Share on other sites
trenchbuff

Very nice research Chris. This isn't an area many collectors are familiar with. Although I knew nurses did not wear rank insignia during WW1, I never noticed the rank insignia being out of place in the photo since there's still a tendancy to expect it on uniforms. Great shots and post as always!!

Visit My Website

Falls Creek Collectibles
Selling Quality 20th Century Militaria


donation2009.gifdonation2010.gifdonation2011.gifdonation2012.gif
donation2013.gifdonation2014.gifdonation2015.gifdonation2016.gif

donation2017.gifdonation2019.gifdonation2020.gif



Link to post
Share on other sites
teufelhunde.ret

A great, informative thread! Thx Chris.


The bended knee is not a tradition of our Corps. (General A. A. Vandegrift, USMC, 5 May 1946)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Chris, Great post!

 

I wonder what the rank is of the nurse nearest to Stimson? Can you make it out?

 

Kim

A member of this fine site since December 16, 2006....Member # 60

donation2007.gifdonation2008.gifdonation2009.gifdonation2010.gif
donation2011.gifdonation2012.gifdonation2013.gifdonation2014.gifdonation2015.gifdonation2016.gif

donation2017.gifdonation2018.gifdonation2019.gifdonation2020.gif


 


 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Chris, Great post!

 

I wonder what the rank is of the nurse nearest to Stimson? Can you make it out?

 

Kim

Kim,

 

On the larger version of this (I had to shrink it for the forum) you can see that all three nurses behind Stimson are wearing captain bars.

 

My guess is that this picture was taken in Washington DC by Harris and Ewing to commemorate the occasion of Nurses being allowed to wear officer's rank. These four must have been the ANC leadership at the time.

 

Unfortunately, Harris and Ewing's record keeping wasn't outstanding so beyond my little bit of detective work and the general subject of the photos there isn't a lot of detail. BTW, the entire Harris and Ewing negative collection is available on line from the Library of Congress. Just search "Harris and Ewing" on google and the collection pops up.

 

The Nurse to the right of Julia Stimson may be Dora E Thompson, who stepped down as Army Nurse Corps Superintendent when she returned from France in 1919. She returned to the ANC by 1920 and was appointed Assistant Superintendent--although I am not certain it is her.

 

Chris

767409605_sigcustom3.png.e95257302e2a500ba241cd8cdc44ff0c.png

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 years later...
librarianjon

I know this post is sevearal years late, but I've just discovered the forum. I work in the Prints & Photographs Division at the Library of Congress and I'm not a cataloger so I can't personally change the records, but I've asked that the catalog record for this photo be updated to reflect was mentioned in this post. If you have any other additional information about our photos, let me know and I'll submit the changes. You can browse our catalog at http://www.loc.gov/pictures/.

 

Jon

Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, the Lady on the right has a striking resemblance to Eleanor Roosevelt!

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

Wow, the Lady on the right has a striking resemblance to Eleanor Roosevelt!

The Nurse to the right of Julia Stimson is most likely Dora E Thompson, who resigned as Army Nurse Corps Superintendent when she returned from France in 1919. She returned to the Army Nurse Corps by 1920 and was appointed Assistant Superintendent. Her relative rank was Captain

 

Chris

767409605_sigcustom3.png.e95257302e2a500ba241cd8cdc44ff0c.png

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.