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H&R Reising M50 Submachine Gun - USMC marked


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Corpsmancollector
post-70-1302776286.jpg

 

GB,

 

That is a fantastic magazine cover! I don't suppose you know the year it was published?

 

Thanks for posting :thumbsup:

 

Will

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GB,

 

That is a fantastic magazine cover! I don't suppose you know the year it was published?

 

Thanks for posting :thumbsup:

 

Will

 

Sure enough, Will; it was the March 1943 USMC photo issue of Popular Photography magazine.

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Here is another Magazine cover
post-9906-0-30256700-1438036924.jpg

You know how much I like Reisings, M50 and M55, don't you Will ;)

Cheers

Martyn

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Corpl. Cleaver

I have a buddy who has one. Looks like it was just made, fantastic shape. Realy fun gun to shoot.

 

 

^^^Me shooting it at the range.

 

Tyler

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nkomo,

 

That's an outstanding piece--congratulations! Here are a couple of pictures showing the Reising in use to complement your post. Hope you like them.

Note the web pouch...*

 

Extremely Cool sub-gun!! :thumbsup: Outstanding photos, as well, GB! :thumbsup:

 

*Wasn't anyone concerned with feeding that puppy?? :ermm: Not the Shepherd... ;)

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nkomo,

 

Thanks for posting! You may be interested in my reference page on the Reising Submachine Gun at the link below.

 

http://www.machinegunboards.com/forums/ind...?showtopic=9688

 

Does your Fed Labs case have the Fed Labs sticker? I'm a Thompson, Reising, and Fed Labs collector. Both the aforementioned submachine guns share a connection through Federal Laboratories.

 

David Albert

dalbert@sturmgewehr.com

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Garandomatic

I hear Reisings are fairly affordable given stories of their reputation in the field... something like $5000 for certain models? Heck, to me that might as well be a million, but had I not bought that old '41 Plymouth...

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I hear Reisings are fairly affordable given stories of their reputation in the field... something like $5000 for certain models? Heck, to me that might as well be a million, but had I not bought that old '41 Plymouth...

 

Garandomatic,

 

Some Reisings have been as low as $3400 recently, and one can certainly be had now for between $4000 and $4500.

 

David Albert

dalbert@sturmgewehr.com

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Corpsmancollector

 

 

Here is another Magazine cover

post-9906-0-43227100-1438037149.jpg

You know how much I like Reisings, M50 and M55, don't you Will ;)

Cheers

Martyn



I certainly do ;)

Always had a soft spot for them myself, the M55 has got to be one of my favourite weapons of WWII. It definitely had the cool factor, even if it wasn't too reliable in the field!

Thanks for adding the Mechanix Illustrated cover Martyn, I'm still hunting for a copy! Thanks to GB too, I'll have to add that one to the wants list! :lol:

Will
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Is that an aftermarket 30 rd Mag? seems to long to be the NOS 20rd

Good eye! :thumbsup: It is indeed an aftermarket 30 round magazine and it functions perfectly in the gun. I will post some original magazines, pouch, and slings when my dad digs them out. :thumbsup:

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Good eye! :thumbsup: It is indeed an aftermarket 30 round magazine and it functions perfectly in the gun. I will post some original magazines, pouch, and slings when my dad digs them out. :thumbsup:

 

nkomo,

 

Yes, the Ken Christie 30-round magazines work quite reliably. Even though they are not historically correct, to a shooter, they make a difference with the 10 extra rounds. The Reising has a cyclic rate that is much higher than what was officially published.

 

David Albert

dalbert@sturmgewehr.com

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It shoots very, very well. He has had it for over 20 years and he has never had a jam with it once.

Yeah but he didn't have to fight in the mud and muck of Guadalcanal. Lol.

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Yeah but he didn't have to fight in the mud and muck of Guadalcanal. Lol.

 

All,

 

Much has been said about the bad reputation formed about the Reising Submachine Gun by Marines at Guadalcanal. The disposal of a large number of Reisings during the Guadalcanal campaign, based on the decision of one Marine leader, cast a dark shadow on the weapon, and subsequently relegated its use to mostly U.S. home guard duty. Most folks who have a knowledge of the Reising probably have heard some details of the Guadalcanal Reising issue as summarized above.

 

What most people don't know are some of the other circumstances of the Reising, which contributed to the issues on Guadalcanal. The Reising became somewhat of a victim of these circumstances.

 

1. The Reising Submachine Gun, manufactured by H&R, was not manufactured with completely interchangeable parts. This fact was not an oversight. The contracts to manufacture the weapon did not specify that the parts had to be interchangeable, and to do so would have meant big changes and delays to its manufacture. Several parts were hand-fitted, and thus became mated to a specific Reising. The weapon demonstrated excellent reliability during testing.

 

2. The conditions at Guadalcanal were challenging, as most are aware. To keep weapons clean, sometimes parts were boiled in communal pots in Marine camps. This meant that parts inevitably became mixed, which was a very bad circumstance, based on the issues described in note #1 above. Insufficient Marine armorer staff existed at Guadalcanal to sort through potential opportunities to re-mate, or re-fit the parts. The result was that many Reising SMGs on Guadalcanal lost their originally fitted parts, which led to profound instances of unreliability, and extreme frustration on the part of some Marines who used them, and perceived them as unreliable combat weapons.

 

3. The leader who gave the command to dispose of the Reisings did so for several reasons...frustration....expediency...and he knew that more Reisings and other support were on the way. Disposal of the mixed up Reisings probably earned him some points with the Marines who hated them, and he could apply what was learned about the Reising in the early days of the conflict to a future shipment of the weapon. Unfortunately, the reputation gained from those early days was never overcome with the Marines to whom they were issued.

 

The Reising served very well with hundreds of law enforcement agencies through the years, and performs well today under the controlled circumstances of Class III owner use. Its WWII reputation still follows it, but is usually perpetuated by folks who have not owned or shot a Reising. The weapon has a few quirks, which are mostly associated with the parts fitting issue. The most common failures today are broken firing pins, and broken action bars. It's a very fun weapon to shoot, with a high cyclic rate of about 800-900 rpm. (Much higher than the originally advertised RPM)

 

I hope I didn't carry on too long here, but I thought some might appreciate more information about the reputational origins of the Reising SMG.

 

David Albert

dalbert@sturmgewehr.com

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All,

 

Much has been said about the bad reputation formed about the Reising Submachine Gun by Marines at Guadalcanal. The disposal of a large number of Reisings during the Guadalcanal campaign, based on the decision of one Marine leader, cast a dark shadow on the weapon, and subsequently relegated its use to mostly U.S. home guard duty. Most folks who have a knowledge of the Reising probably have heard some details of the Guadalcanal Reising issue as summarized above.

 

What most people don't know are some of the other circumstances of the Reising, which contributed to the issues on Guadalcanal. The Reising became somewhat of a victim of these circumstances.

 

1. The Reising Submachine Gun, manufactured by H&R, was not manufactured with completely interchangeable parts. This fact was not an oversight. The contracts to manufacture the weapon did not specify that the parts had to be interchangeable, and to do so would have meant big changes and delays to its manufacture. Several parts were hand-fitted, and thus became mated to a specific Reising. The weapon demonstrated excellent reliability during testing.

 

2. The conditions at Guadalcanal were challenging, as most are aware. To keep weapons clean, sometimes parts were boiled in communal pots in Marine camps. This meant that parts inevitably became mixed, which was a very bad circumstance, based on the issues described in note #1 above. Insufficient Marine armorer staff existed at Guadalcanal to sort through potential opportunities to re-mate, or re-fit the parts. The result was that many Reising SMGs on Guadalcanal lost their originally fitted parts, which led to profound instances of unreliability, and extreme frustration on the part of some Marines who used them, and perceived them as unreliable combat weapons.

 

3. The leader who gave the command to dispose of the Reisings did so for several reasons...frustration....expediency...and he knew that more Reisings and other support were on the way. Disposal of the mixed up Reisings probably earned him some points with the Marines who hated them, and he could apply what was learned about the Reising in the early days of the conflict to a future shipment of the weapon. Unfortunately, the reputation gained from those early days was never overcome with the Marines to whom they were issued.

 

The Reising served very well with hundreds of law enforcement agencies through the years, and performs well today under the controlled circumstances of Class III owner use. Its WWII reputation still follows it, but is usually perpetuated by folks who have not owned or shot a Reising. The weapon has a few quirks, which are mostly associated with the parts fitting issue. The most common failures today are broken firing pins, and broken action bars. It's a very fun weapon to shoot, with a high cyclic rate of about 800-900 rpm. (Much higher than the originally advertised RPM)

 

I hope I didn't carry on too long here, but I thought some might appreciate more information about the reputational origins of the Reising SMG.

 

David Albert

dalbert@sturmgewehr.com

The fact is had it not been for the muck and mud of Guadalcanal there would have been no reason to boil the parts resulting in mix ups. The muck and mud caused the problems and the Marines wanted a fair shot ( no pun intended ) at the Japanese.

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The fact is had it not been for the muck and mud of Guadalcanal there would have been no reason to boil the parts resulting in mix ups. The muck and mud caused the problems and the Marines wanted a fair shot ( no pun intended ) at the Japanese.

Keep in mind that parts were cleaned like that to rid them of the corrosive primer residue.

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Keep in mind that parts were cleaned like that to rid them of the corrosive primer residue.

 

Yes, you are exactly right. I presume other weapons had their parts boiled for the same reason, and parts became mixed, but their designed interchangeability meant that reliability was sustained. The Reising did not have the interchangeability factor.

 

David Albert

dalbert@sturmgewehr.com

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I was just going to ask about that. You don't need to boil parts in water to get rid of mud & muck. Thanks, David, for a very informative post.

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I was just going to ask about that. You don't need to boil parts in water to get rid of mud & muck. Thanks, David, for a very informative post.

The "muck" is everything else other than the mud....

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Thanks much David,

For a truly informative posting.

Regards,

Don.

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