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Entrenching / Intrenching Tools & T Handle Shovels


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Etools to go with the covers.

 

Top AMES 1943

 

Middle AF&H CO 1943 (American Fork & Hoe)

 

bottom WOOD 1943

 

I know of no other makers.

 

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Thank you for this information. It took me a long time to find a good and OD#3 (with OD#7 borders) carrier for the folding shovel made in 1943. You've got some nice covers and E-tools!

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I know that collectors call those M1910 covers with the faint "US" stamp and USMC type brass hooks as being "USMC t handle shovel covers"....and I own one of them myself....but the ones that are no doubt legit USMC issue look quite a bit different. I've got two that look like USMC because of the lack of any markings and they have the cast bronze buckles and square end tips on the strap. But the one that's no doubt USMC will be a lightweight mustard tan canvas, cast bronze buckle and square end tips. and.....this is definitive.....a web TAPE strap used due to the fact that the Marine Corps Phila Depot lacked proper machines to attach the standard webbing straps. This is the t handle shovel cover used by the USMC throughout WW2 although they also used quite a few US Army contract covers.

 

I'll attach pics ASAP

Greg Robinson "marine-kabar"

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Upper left cover: Not 100% sure of this one. Had markings at some point but they were covered with paint. Has brass hooks. And it has movie property stamping inside. So it's a "maybe" Might be WW1 vintage.

 

Upper right cover: Most likely USMC. Manufacturing is consistent with USMC covers. thin wire steel hooks. Don't know what the markings refer to.

 

Lower cover: 100% certain of this one. Has the web tape straps which is how the Phila Depot did it early WW2. Also has the thin wire steel hooks.

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Greg Robinson "marine-kabar"

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The shovel you have picture is what others have referred to me as the USMC pattern e-tool. Whether this is true or not, I do know that shovel pattern is quite rare and I have only seen a few. I'm lucky enough to have 3 and they all have the same construction with the reenforcement plate welded to the back and same distinct green paint.

***WANTED: MINT UNISSUED USMC DEPOT WEB GEAR AND A SIZE 38 P42 CAMO JACKET***

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I have a number of standard M1910 shovels in my collection, and one that is quite a bit different from the rest. It is different in construction from the other shovels (much flimsier), and is only marked 'US' on the metal shaft above the blade in a long, thin font. I could't find any markings on the wood, although those can be worn away. I'm pretty sure this is not a reproduction or aftermarket thing, since it has obvious signs of old age and is marked as military property. I have heard 3 possible theories: 1. the shovel is actually one of the mysterious M1908 pattern shovels; 2. it is an extremely rare British made example; and 3. it is a very early production M1910 pattern.

 

I personally think the 3th option is the most accurate, as there is no proof either the M1908 pattern or a British made variant even ever existed. Due to the fragile construction of this example it sounds very plausible to me the design was soon altered in something more sturdy. I am keen to hear if someone else has the same model shovel, or any confirmation or other identification of this shovel. The blade has the same size as a standard M1910 head; it fits nicely in a 1942 dated carrier.

 

First, some overall pics and a detail of the construction:

 

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Second, a close-up of the only marking:

 

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Money can't buy happiness -- but somehow it's more comfortable to cry in a Corvette than in a Yugo.

 

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David, pre WW2 is outside my area of interest but I think the unusual shovel you show is an original M1910 version. It was determined fairly quickly the design was weak and they were re-designed. There are several othe rmembers here that can tell you more about it.

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  • 5 weeks later...

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This part is to member ' earlymb', I think you certainly have a M-1910 pattern shovel , and definatly no later than 1913 as the plans I am showing are dated 1913, and these show the regular recognised metalwork holding the shaft from both sides. I have a shovel than may be slightly earlier than yours in that the metalwork coming away from the blade up the shaft is only on the front, it does not wrap around the rear as yours does. so I would think that yours is an improvement on mine, but then the improvement on yours becomes the standard.

I am sorry mine is packed away and not available to display and I can only show a photo of a photo, it can be seen that the two rivits have split the wood due to no metal support there.

.

Young enough to care and enjoy militaria - Old enough to remember as surplus

 

" Life's too short for reproductions "

 

 

Life is like a tank of gas, the closer you get to a quarter tank, the faster it goes 

 

.

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OK. Now what the heck is this one?

 

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Learn to ride hard, shoot straight, dance well and so live that you can, if necessary, look any man in the eye and tell him to go to Hell! US Cavalry Manual, 1923

WWII APS

 

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Hello Marine-Kabar, regarding your post #10 on this loop, you show 1910 covers that you mention as Marine with which I agree. The one you show has number 76 on the rear and you wonder what it relates to, well I have one marked 74. If these covers were consecutively numbered then our two covers started life next to one another at some stage. So do any other of our forum members have number 75 ? Presently I think our two covers reside some three thousand miles or so apart, so I copied your photo and shot mine sat on the tailgate of my red pick-up as you have done with yours, just so they can both feel at home.

.

Young enough to care and enjoy militaria - Old enough to remember as surplus

 

" Life's too short for reproductions "

 

 

Life is like a tank of gas, the closer you get to a quarter tank, the faster it goes 

 

.

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  • 6 months later...
  • 2 months later...
Guest m1carbine44

hi guys im new to this forum and i have a shovel i got from my nieghbor that i was curious if anyone has any idea what it is god knows i dont.

 

http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f72/m1ca...oberts07013.jpg

 

http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f72/m1ca...oberts07011.jpg

 

http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f72/m1ca...oberts07010.jpg

 

http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f72/m1ca...oberts07009.jpg

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  • 4 years later...

Can one of you kind gentlemen if you have one in your collection please measure the handle legnth of a "cut down" M1943 shovel handle...i picked one up today a genuine AMES 1944 but want to know if the handle legnth was cut down 68 years ago (if there was a standard legnth) and not 6 months ago.

 

Thank you all for checking for me

 

Regards

 

Lloyd

What do you need another one of those for.....you have 6 of them already ?.........

:blink:

 

my girlfriend to me on a regular basis as another piece of US WW2 "Green stuff" aka militaria arrives in the post..:-)

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I don't think I have ever heard of an "official" length for a shorter handle, and aside from the T-handles that are seen I don't recall seeing an original photo of a shortened handle on an M1943 shovel.

"It is a capital mistake to theorize before one has data. Insensibly one begins to twist facts to suit theories, instead of theories to suit facts."

*Sherlock Holmes in "A Scandal in Bohemia"*

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