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heftaa01

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  1. Great find! I’m primarily a 28th Division Collector and spent years trying to find an original (I’m also a Pathfinder Graduate so this hits double in my area of interest!). I’ve attached some info on the unit. The unit was folded and it’s members helped form the 104th Inf Detachment (LRS) in 1990. It’s very elusive when it comes to research, but a very cool and short lived unit none the less!
  2. The 28th Division has some examples of units that wore the keystone painted on helmets in the interwar era. Heres a shot of the 112th a week after Pearl Harbor with a Keystone painted on a Kelly Helmet.
  3. Photo of 1st City Troop Philadelphia City Cavalry patch being worn on a field uniform above the 28th Division Patch. 1st City Troop is part of the 1/104th Cav, PAARNG.
  4. A new article came out with more info on this. https://www.dvidshub.net/news/297560/pa-guard-adds-new-shoulder-sleeve-insignia The new patch features a black horse on a gold keystone shield edged with a blue border, in a slightly larger size than the former Keystone patch. Blue and gold are both the unit and the commonwealth of Pennsylvanias colors. The keystone shape is also indicative of the units assignment in the Pennsylvania National Guards 28th Infantry Division. The black horse is emblematic of the units history as a mounted maneuver brigade as well as signifying strength, agility and loyalty. The patchs colors are subdued as part of the duty uniform.
  5. The 55th Brigade of the PA Guard recently switched from the traditional keystone SSI to a new one bearing a rearing horse. I was at aft Indiantown Gap this weekend and was able to secure one of these patches from a current 55th soldier. Of note the patch is significantly larger than the regular division keystone. I asked a few soldiers of the Brigade why they had switched SSI but none could give an answer. One soldier did state that the horse was taken from the old gray mare moniker of the 109th INF.
  6. Recently I was reviewing a collection of SC photographs called "The Composite Soldier" which looks at soldiers of the 32nd Division based on their ethnic, educational, and social backgrounds. The photos were taken in January 1919. I noticed several NG disks and unit marked disks, but also saw this guy:
  7. Hello, The chart show can be found in the 2 and 5 volume copies of the 28th Division History produced shortly post-war. I've attached a still image from footage of the 111th and 112th infantry arriving in Calais where the markings can be seen on several of the A bag's being unloaded. Additionally attached are images of an Officer's musette in my collection with the tac markings still present. I've been researching the 28th Division marking system for a little while now and have not seen any other surviving examples, and this footage is one of the few examples ive seen of the marking system in use during the war. Of note, the Keystone was officially adopted August 27th 1879 as the symbol for the "Pennsylvania Division" or PA National Guard, so there had been a decent base of keystone usage (and colored keystone markings) prior to WW1. -Aaron
  8. The second, a service coat, was picked up at a local event for ungodly cheap. The seller had tons of uniforms at low cost, and stated most were brought in by family members after loved ones passed. I was able to find a laundry mark in the sleeve which narrowed my search down. I searched the names for my area of PA and found an OBIT that matched the ribbons and rank on the coat. Further research is required but felt like this was a pretty probably ID. Ribbons are as found, but the bar and collar disks show evidence of being on the coat for a long time in this configuration.
  9. Shot of Jacket laid out with possible ID.
  10. Added 2 more jackets to my collection due to the sharp eyes of a friend. I've been building the 28th collection over the years, and these fill a gap in WWII Uniforms. After getting them home I was able to use laundry numbers and notes in one pocket to get a tenuous ID for both. Further research will determine if these are correct but its a start for now. First up is an Ike with 28th and 66th ID insignia. Inside the pocket I was able to find two notes. I researched both names which appear to be 109th INF soldiers (so CIB and PUC make sense). One name however matches a laundry mark I found inside the sleeve.
  11. Nice! I see the 28th Wooden Shoes more frequently than other units, I wonder why?
  12. Just picked this Tunic up as I've been looking for more interwar uniforms lately. The insignia is interesting to me, but I've not seen any like it before. Marked with a Caduceus and "US 1" discs. Crests are a sheild of red and silver (or red and gold) with some sort of plant. Chevrons are a medical corporal? Any Ideas? Does it look legitimate
  13. Ryan Kergides. On facebook under "Service Company Rigger Modifications" his work is spot on and he can replicate various styles of reinforcing used by different units which really make the impression standout from the off the rack sets.
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