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FtrPlt

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  1. FtrPlt

    1950s USAF Ike

    The mismatch was my area of concern. It was cheap money for the jacket and flying trousers but I really don't care too much for humped-up uniforms. I don't think that was the case here but the odds of finding bullion rank on that shade of blue is probably pretty remote. I see bullion wings occassionally but this jacket had pin-on. I didn't look closely enough at the bullion "US" collars to see if they were recent additions? Probably unlikely outside of a family member trying to put the guys uniform back together for him (or themselves)
  2. Just a note: you need to flip the ribbon bar. The Good Conduct Medal ia higher in precedence
  3. FtrPlt

    1950s USAF Ike

    That's always the great unknown. I'm not well versed on 1950s dress regs. From the limited reading I've done on the original Shade 84 uniforms, it seemed like USAF was hellbent on getting rid of the 'personal expression' that was common coming out of WW2. The uniforms on the links you provided are awesome!
  4. FtrPlt

    1950s USAF Ike

    Cool link! Kind of goes back to my original question re: was it 'normal/usual' for badging to consist of mixed types? From the items in the link, it appears that the badging is all of the same type -- all bullion; presumably all metal; or all embroidered although I've not seen any photos of sewn-on, embroidered on blue, badging.
  5. FtrPlt

    1950s USAF Ike

    Bullion embroidered. This photo credit to reddevil1311 from a 2012 post Embroidered (plain colored thread, not bullion)(photo source: web search) During my service, the badging had to be the same. In my case, it was silver-oxide or mirror finish. You couldn't mix-and-match the types. When I think bullion, I imagine this -- collars and wings using the same material. Not silver oxide US with bullion wing.
  6. FtrPlt

    1950s USAF Ike

    Hi, Thanks for your reply. I probably worded my question poorly. I was enquiring about the mixed badging types being worn together -- bullion, sew-on, and pin on all on the jacket. Early 1950s button-front, blue ike that has sew-on bullion US collars; embroidered, sewn-on Major oak leaves on matching blue fabric backing; and 2×holes suggesting a pin-on wing just above the left pocket. Phone was full so I didnt get photos.
  7. FtrPlt

    1950s USAF Ike

    Saw a 1950s USAF officer Ike at a local yard sale today. Badging struck me as odd. Bullion US collars, embroidered-on-blue Major's oakleaves. And what I presume to be holes from a clutch-fastener type aircrew wing. Also a pair of flight trousers in the same blue fabric. Supposedly belonged to a former B-29 crewman. Not sure what the regs were back then but I would presume that badging types would be of the same type -- ie all embroidered; all pin-on; or all bullion? Also, the blue flying pants worn with an Ike? I vaguely recall seeing a blue 4-pocket flying shirt of some type that would be more of a match to the trousers.
  8. There was also an issue 6-color version of the old green fatigue cap.
  9. Thanks for your replies! I served in USAF in the early 1980s and the green fatigues were still in use. Changed branches for 6 years and returned to USAFR/ANG in the early 90s. I remember BDUs being worn but do not recall seeing anything but the usual embroidered tapes. I'm sure it must have been a timing thing. Presuming there was a wearout date for the pre-1990 embroidered stuff? Judging by the Lackland photos, TI's are still wearing stripes/embroidered tapes in 1992 while the recruits appear to be issued the leather nametag. By 1993, TI's are seen with the leather nametags but stripes are back on their sleeves. And by 1994, it looks like things reverted back to pre-1990
  10. Very familiar with flightsuit nametags. In this case, I'm literally referring to the period of time when USAF was wearing woodland BDUs but did away with the embroidered name/branch tapes along with stripes. I was able to find an old AFI 36-2903 specifying the aircrew style leather nametag would not be used on BDUs after 30 SEP 1997. Same AFI states embroidered Name/USAF tapes were mandatory on 1 OCT 1997. I'm assuming that somewhere in there both styles were in concurrent use. I'm interested in when it started. Was it a McPeak thing that started around 1990? Or did USAF BDUs utilize the aircrew style nametag upon adoption of BDUs in ~1986? Here's a photo from Lackland AFB of new recruits sporting BDUs with the leather nametags
  11. Very familiar with flightsuit nametags. In this case, I'm literally referring to the period of time when USAF was wearing woodland BDUs but did away with the embroidered name/branch tapes along with stripes. I was able to find an old AFI 36-2903 specifying the aircrew style leather nametag would not be used on BDUs after 30 SEP 1997. Same AFI states embroidered Name/USAF tapes were mandatory on 1 OCT 1997. I'm assuming that somewhere in there both styles were in concurrent use. I'm interested in when it started. Was it a McPeak thing that started around 1990? Or did USAF BDUs utilize the aircrew style nametag upon adoption of BDUs in ~1986?
  12. Does anyone know when USAF switched back to embroidered name/branch/stripes from the black leather nametags on BDUs? replacement AFII've been looking for 1980s PDF's of the old AFR35-10 and successor AFI but, thus far, haven't found anything.
  13. Certainly true for the BDU and the 6 -color DBDU. I find it interesting that the DBDU is still shown in the 2005 version of AR 670-1 while the DCU is not.
  14. Sorry, uploaded the wrong photo. I'm familiar with the black-on-tan version. Do not recall seeing the brown-on-tan. Photos via internet
  15. Does anyone know if Army WO ranks for the DBDU/DCU were brown-on-tan? I'm familiar with the nametags and US ARMY tapes in brown. Always thought the rank was either pin-on-subdued or black-on-tan embroidered.
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