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dhcoleterracina

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  • Location
    Southern California
  • Interests
    US Medals, primarily type collector. Collect relic items, especially relic weapons from all countries and eras.

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  1. Gentlemen, I'm researching a veteran named John Collier Beckett (possible ID number of 81953) who was a commander in WW2 in the USNR. I'm trying to find the ship he served or commanded. One item shows he was a Lieutenant Commander but then the Lieutenant was removed so I guess he got promoted. Any help greatly appreciated. Thanks
  2. Great flag, I must have missed your earlier post. Everything you've said is correct based on my knowledge. The zinc was used to save brass and helps date the manufacture to wartime. We will never know if this was a surplus flag flown in 1948 unless you have history on it. A #12 is the most desirable simply because of its size, it is easier to frame. I love the grommets on yours, nothing rusts better than salt air on the Pacific. If I had to venture a guess, I would put your flag at the first half on 1943. As you say, the painted stars and fewer grommets came later. I have at least
  3. Provenance, provenance, provenance It came out of a storage locker...I don't know the owner of the locker... I know the city. Well, that confirms it for me. Let me just whip out my checkbook.
  4. Both of your posted medals look beautiful. Thanks for showing.
  5. My first observation is the color of the national flag, it's very dark and consistent with a ship flown flag. Flags flown downwind of the ships stacks cause this dark staining. This coupled with the multi-grommet suggests it's a Navy flag. Perhaps a hospital ship? Perhaps a ships flag given away to the medical people? Many explanations possible. Professional conservation is wonderful and the best option for preserving flags. Unfortunately it will exceed the market value of the flags and with a little research, you can do it yourself. Common plastic tubs are fine. Other threads her
  6. I'm not into A-2's so I can't say that this is good or bad. It looks good to my inexperienced eye. I agree with the comment about Ed Hicks being a reputable dealer. I know that A-2's were made after the war and beyond but those have had a look of something recently manufactured. Most have new tags as they aren't made to fool. Can we see the tag inside yours? With prices in the thousands often , I'm sure that there are questionable pieces out there. Take a real but plain jane A-2 (available and reasonable) and sew on real leather patches to a combat unit. All authenti
  7. For this type of display I see nothing wrong with including what he appears to have earned. I would only become concerned when the family "heard" he had received the Silver Star and want to include that without evidence.
  8. Great way to include the boxes, you've got us thinking about a new display option.
  9. https://www.ebay.com/itm/Important-Franklin-D-Roosevelt-WWII-Naval-Flag-from-his-1943-Trip-to-Casablanca/353176914579?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_trksid=p2060353.m1438.l2649 For only $2798.99 (plus $64.95 shipping) this historic flag could be yours. This flag purportedly flew on the light cruiser USS Memphis when FDR was on board travelling to Casablanca for the historic meeting with Churchill and Stalin. The proof? It came from the famous Rungee Flag Auction a couple of years ago AND most importantly, someone wrote on the hoist the details. "NR 1
  10. Good question, I have a document that was exposed to moisture for a long time. I'm thinking of an iron on the lowest temperature. My plan is to do a small corner and see if it works. I'll let you know.
  11. Reversed month/day might suggest it was done in Europe. If it was an average KIA Heart then maybe it was something that the family did in the last 20 years. However, why do these always seem to be a paratrooper Heart, doctor no less, famous action? Another recent was a D-Day Heart.
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