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Matt-M

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  • Location
    So. Cal.
  • Interests
    from early American history, 1840's through Vietnam, I collect combat related groupings that are very complete with a focus on fighter pilots - important medals - squadron patches - U.S. Air Service - Airborne - OSS - FSSF - Special Forces - Submariner - UDT

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  1. The eagle's head protrudes significantly from the face of the badge and would be in the way of any type of movement, which is why I figured it was a shako plate. Also, the starburst backplate led me in this direction, but still looking to hear other opinions.
  2. I was thinking it may be earlier, maybe Span Am War era
  3. Excellent information. Thank you kindly for enlightening me. Cheers! Matt
  4. Wow!!! I'm in awe!! Thank you, Bill ! I figured that ID'ing this Marine would be like finding the proverbial needle in the hay stack. Hoping the estate seller finds more of his effects. Should hear from them in the next week-10 days.
  5. How many John Smith's in the phonebook? Seller says he was awarded PH in WW2 and may find it once estate is sorted. Otherwise, we'll never know, but thank you John L. Smith for your service! Semper Fi.
  6. A very interesting piece. That fact that it is stamped STERLING would lead me to believe that it was manufactured in multiple quantities and was die struck, which would make me think less "unofficial", but this is just my initial thoughts on it. The design very closely resembles the Philippine made (in the same style as the belt buckles) Vietnam era wings.
  7. The ribbons certainly point to one man's service in the Navy. They are in excellent condition and might be worth hanging onto in hopes you might be able to acquire his name. 20+ years of service and a Navy Commendation to boot. If the ribbons could only speak of what he saw!
  8. Picked this up off of e*ay. They were attached to a crude chain, that I freed them from. Sadly, there is no name engraved on the rim of the Sampson, but the Yangtze is M.No numbered and am confident that these all belonged to the same sailor. I am not all too familiar with all of the phases of the Sampson and welcome opinions on its construction / strike and also as to what top bar would it have been issued with. Thank you.
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