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Golem

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  1. Yes, after the trial ends, and all the points are tabulated.
  2. From Guy Cramer (one of the designers of US4CES [a pattern currently being trialed]) on the adoption of OCP (multicam) Army-wide: He and I agree - let the trials get to completion and then make an informed decision. It was a knee-jerk decision that got us UCP. let's not make another one to alleviate public irritation or "save face". Another thing he and I agree on is that the media has taken this "$5bn camo failure" story and totally screwed it up, which is leading to more confusion on the issue. Are Digital Pixel Camouflage Patterns Ineffective? - Guy Cramer
  3. If this is true, why not shut down the trials now? I mean, if they've already made up their mind, what's the point of continuing the expensive trial process? I think this story is the product of some misunderstandings, or a "high official" spewing something "off the record" s/he thinks will soothe the concerned public who've read the "$5bn uniform fiasco" stories.
  4. Been looking (see signature)
  5. Skill badges ≠ insignia Skill badges acquired in one U.S. military branch can be worn in other U.S. branches of service (as seen by the number of non-current-service skill badges worn on the various uniforms), Skill badges acquired while in service, can obviously be worn while in that service. A combat jump (while attached to an Army unit) by an AF PJ or combat controller certainly qualifies. The Air Force does not have a jump school, and sends all their folks who need to be jump qualified to Fort Benning.
  6. Thread title is misleading. Arlington is going to offer a location app, that can run on any smart phone. It's got nothing to do with the wireless protocol used.
  7. From your pix, I don't see any "sensitive items". All that Dick Tracy stuff can be purchased over-the-counter by anyone. "Sensitive items" are things like next-gen and/or classified technology. As polecat notes, ACU (Army Combat Uniform) is the pattern to which the garment is made. UCP (Universal Camouflage Pattern) is the camouflage design used on the material that is sewn together to make standard-issue ACUs. OCP (Operation Enduring Freedom Camouflage Pattern) is the camouflage pattern being worn in Afghanistan. We also know it as "multicam". As polecat points out, ACUs are i
  8. I saw the thread title and thought it'd be about a specially-designed investigators ACU. Your thread title should read "Forensic crime kit UCP"
  9. Tailor? Isn't that limited to class "A" uniform coats? The brass has weighed in on the 'money spent by troops on uniforms', and one of their contributions was the velcro-everywhere uniform. This was designed to "save the soldier money" in sewing costs for name/branch tapes and unit patches. "Adorn"? The supply sergeant has unit patches and branch tapes, if necessary. Since the ACU arrived, there should be no need for new name tapes with every new uniform.
  10. This isn't "another" pattern, it has always been part of the current trials. There have been a few threads here on these trials.
  11. I'm not sure about the construction of the PASGT, but soft kevlar body armor deteriorates over time. Is this a concern?
  12. This is why the Navy came up with the Type II and III NWU (formerly known as AOR2 and AOR3) for tactical usage. Type II (desert) NWU Type III (woodland) NWU
  13. Our unit deployed from Germany in 1990 with 4 sets of woodland BDUs. We were told we'd get issued desert uniforms when we got to Saudi Arabia. I think everybody had one set by the time we left, but they were issued piecemeal (a couple soldiers here, a few more later, some 6-color desert BDUs, some 3-color desert BDUs, etc) That being said, some of my peers wore woodland BDUs the whole time over there . .
  14. Yep, when our unit deployed in 1990, 3-color desert uniforms were issued out to some of the soldiers (where the 6-color pieces weren't available).
  15. I believe the Navy specced the pattern so permanent stains wouldn't show up so much, and the garment have to be replaced as often. You know, the stains the laundry can't get out? Nobody wants sailors in dirty uniforms.
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